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Debian

Debian 11: Moving forward while standing still

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Debian

For those who are new to Linux, I'd love to be able to recommend Debian 11 to you. However, because the installation isn't nearly as simple as is that of, say, Ubuntu, you'd be best served either having someone with more experience install Debian for you, or wait it out until you have a bit more familiarity with Linux under your belt. Although you won't be asked to manually partition your drive, there are questions about mirrors and domains that could easily trip you up. So if you're new to Linux and you insist on experiencing the remarkable stability that is Debian 11, I'd suggest you do a bit of research into the Debian installer before you do.

However, you shouldn't let that warning put you off. Even those without any Linux experience could muddle their way through installation, I'd hate for someone new to Linux to be turned away because the Debian installation isn't a two- or three-click process. So if you are new to Linux, grab a friend who has installed Linux and let them walk you through the process.

Trust me, Debian 11 is worth the smallest bit of extra effort you might have to go through to complete the installation. It's that good. In fact, it's one of the few instances where I can say a Linux distribution moves forward while standing firmly in place.

Download your copy of Debian 11 now.

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TopJoy ButterFly is a Full-Color DES Screen e-Reader with Android 11 (Crowdfunding)

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Android
Linux
Hardware
Debian

TopJoy ButterFly is a full-color DES screen e-Reader running Android 11 on a quad-core Cortex-A55 processor that appears to be the same Rockchip RK3566 processor used in the upcoming PineNote e-reader.

Two models of the e-Reader are offers with E601 fitted with a 6-inch display and E701 with a larger 7.8-inch display both offering 300 PPI for black & white content and 150 PPI for color, and equipped with 2GB RAM & 32GB storage by default, an option for 4GB RAM and 64GB storage for the larger display.

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Also: ASUS Tinker Board 2S SBC launched for $120 and up

Debian: Envertech, Communication Platforms, and EasyOS

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Debian
  • Sven Hoexter: PV - Monitoring Envertech Microinverter via envertecportal.com

    Some time ago I looked briefly at an Envertech data logger for small scale photovoltaic setups. Turned out that PV inverter are kinda unreliable, and you really have to monitor them to notice downtimes and defects. Since my pal shot for a quick win I've cobbled together another Python script to query the portal at www.envertecportal.com, and report back if the generated power is down to 0. The script is currently run on a vserver via cron and reports back via the system MTA. So yeah, you need to have something like that already at hand.

  • Some site updates

    We’re in the process of upgrading to Debian 11 (bullseye). If you come across any issues, feel free to raise them on the #debian-social IRC channel on oftc (also accessible via Matrix) and we’ll look into it as soon as we have a chance.

  • Matrix Synapse updated and new plumbed IRC rooms

    Matrix synapse was updated to 1.40.0, during the upgrade the server was upgraded to Bullseye.

  • Infrastructure in place to run each app as a separate user

    Running an app as a non-root user also means that it can't write just anywhere in the filesystem, can be constrained to only write in its own home folder. And if required, can be prevented from reading critical files.

    Of course Easy already has "crippled root" in containers, so running, say, SeaMonkey, on the main desktop as a non-root user would have to be seen as an alternative security strategy. SeaMonkey will run a little bit faster, and won't have the issues that some people have reported with running SM in a container, such as problem with network connectivity.

    If each app is run as its own user, this means that EasyOS can implement a permissions management GUI like in Android. Like, do you want this app to be able to access the camera, network, audio, folders outside the "home" folder? ...etc.

    So, have started to setup the infrastructure to support this. The idea is that top-level /clients folder will have these non-root users, though I would like to refer to them as "clients".

New Debian Developers and Maintainers (July and August 2021)

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Debian

The following contributors got their Debian Developer accounts in the last two months:

Aloïs Micard (creekorful)
Sophie Brun (sophieb)

The following contributors were added as Debian Maintainers in the last two months:

Douglas Andrew Torrance
Marcel Fourné
Marcos Talau
Sebastian Geiger

Congratulations!

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Elecrow CrowPi 2 electronics learning laptop hands-on: Raspberry Pi 4 laptop for students

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Hardware
Reviews
Debian

Since Raspbian is based on Debian Linux, it's a fairly robust and capable OS. If it runs on ARM Linux, it runs on the CrowPi 2. This includes mainstays like GIMP for image editing, LibreOffice for office work, Chromium and Firefox for web browsing, and (of course) Minecraft Pi Edition for gaming. There are also a handful of Python games, but these are good for only a few minutes of fun and are truly intended to teach Python coding.

Thankfully, the larger 11.6-inch 1920x1080 screen makes retro gaming viable. Elecrow includes instructions for installing RetroPie to a microSD card and booting it on the CrowPi 2. The company also includes two USB controllers styled after the SNES gamepads for gaming. This is how my kids prefer to use the CrowPi 2, and it makes for a good portable retro gaming machine.

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Also: Repair, Repurpose, Upgrade With the Raspberry Pi Or Pico

IBM and Debian Leftovers

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Red Hat
Debian

  • Some things to reduce background bandwidth usage on a Fedora machine

    Suppose, not entirely hypothetically, that you have a Fedora laptop and you want it to use minimal bandwidth for things that you don't specifically do. Unfortunately there are only a few things that I know of to do, and I'm not sure they're comprehensive. Most of my information comes from this old r/Fedora post.

  • First POWER10 Machine Announced

    IBM turns up the volume to 10 (and their server numbers to four digits) with the Power E1080 server, the launch system for POWER10. POWER10 is a 7nm chip fabbed by Samsung with up to 15 SMT-8 cores (a 16th core is disabled for yield) for up to 120 threads per chip. IBM bills POWER10 as having 2.5 times more performance per core than Intel Xeon Platinum (based on an HPE Superdome system running Xeon Platinum 8380H parts), 2.5 times the AES crypto performance per core of POWER9 (no doubt due to quadruple the crypto engines present), five times "AI inferencing per socket" (whatever that means) over Power E980 via the POWER10's matrix math and AI accelerators, and 33% less power usage than the E980 for the same workload. AIX, Linux and IBM i are all supported.

  • Russ Allbery: Pod::Thread 3.00

    This Perl module converts POD documents to thread, the macro language I use for my static site builder (about which, more in another software release coming up shortly). This release fixes a whole ton of long-standing problems.

  • Fscrypt broken in user spot

    It turns out that there is a fundamental problem in EasyOS. If a person entered a password at the very first bootup, Easy creates encrypted folders in the ext4 working-partition. So, if anyone steals your usb-stick or hard drive, they won't be able to access the files in those folders.

    The encryption mechanism works on a per-folder basis, and the init script in the initrd will unlock those folders when the correct password is entered at bootup. It works great, however, falls apart if login as a non-root user...

    I have a utility, 'keyctl', from the 'keyutils' package. I have today compiled that in OE and added it to the package list, so it will be in future releases of EasyOS. It is for managing the kernel keys. I know hardly anything about this topic, but let's explore...

Bits from Debian: DebConf21 online closes

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Debian

On Saturday 28 August 2021, the annual Debian Developers and Contributors Conference came to a close.

DebConf21 has been held online for the second time, due to the coronavirus (COVID-19) disease pandemic.

All of the sessions have been streamed, with a variety of ways of participating: via IRC messaging, online collaborative text documents, and video conferencing meeting rooms.

With 740 registered attendees from more than 15 different countries and a total of over 70 event talks, discussion sessions, Birds of a Feather (BoF) gatherings and other activities, DebConf21 was a large success.

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Antoine Beaupré: Automating major Debian upgrades

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Debian

It's major upgrade time again! The Debian project just published the Debian 11 "bullseye" release, and it's pretty awesome! This makes me realized that I have never written here about my peculiar upgrade process, and figured it was worth bringing that up to a wider audience.

My upgrade process also has a notable changes section which includes major version changes (e.g. Inkscape 1.0!), new packages (e.g. podman!) and important behavior changes (e.g. driverless scanning and printing!).

I'm particularly interested to hear about any significant change I might have missed. If you know of a cool new package that shipped with bullseye and that I forgot, do let me know!

But that's for the cool new stuff. We need to talk about the problems with Debian major upgrades.

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Ulrike Uhlig & Debian, the $200,000 woman who quit

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Debian

From all those women and all that money, Debian only found one woman who became a Debian Developer, Ulrike Uhlig. Ulrike has quit Debian after just 4 years.

Debian paid $200,000 to find this woman and she quit.

Ulrike claims to be interested in human rights and mediation techniques. Yet she went to the online DebConf and gave a talk with the mafiosi Enrico Zini, this is the fascist who expels people on a whim without any due process or any other basics of human rights. Zini was complicit in expelling Dr Norbert Preining the week before Christmas and also fabricating the rape accusations against Jacob Appelbaum. For Ulrike to give a talk with a gangster like this suggests that she has no understanding of the principles she claims to stand for.

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XDO Pantera Pico PC review: a Rubik’s Cube sized PC

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Hardware
Reviews
Debian

The XDO Pantera Pico PC will be available in a number of different configurations, but they’ll all have the basics such as an Intel J4125 2.7Ghz Gemini Lake Celeron processor, 2.4/5Ghz 422Mb/s WiFi, Bluetooth 5.0, 3 USB-A 3.0 ports, 1 USB-A 2.0 port, M.2 internal SSD storage, a Micro SD slot, a 3.5mm audio jack, HDMI 2.0 port, and Intel UHD Graphics 600 GPU for 4K video output. There is a USB-C port, but that’s only used for the power supply. The dimensions are 60 x 60 x 50 mm and the weight is 0.39lbs. Configuration options will have 4 to 8Gb LPDDR4 RAM, and 64Gb to 512Gb EMMC5.1 storage.

[...]

Debian 11 works a lot more reliably, but it doesn’t include the WiFi hardware drivers out of the gate, so getting the network connection might take some work.

Getting some flavor of Linux running on this will take some more time, but XDO provides a guide for getting Ubuntu to run as a live disk from a USB drive. Ubuntu gave me some errors trying to get it onto a MicroSD card (as I think that card became corrupted after installing Debian 11), so I didn’t even get that to live boot just yet.

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Also: SonoBus

Linux on the Framework Laptop [Ed: Belated step in the right direction because previously they forced everyone to pay Microsoft for malware]

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More in Tux Machines

Devices/Embedded: Asus Tinker Board 2 and More

  • Asus Tinker Board 2 single-board computer now available for $94 and up - Liliputing

    The Asus Tinker Board 2 is a Raspberry Pi-shaped single-board computer powered by a Rockchip RK3399 hexa-core processor and featuring 2GB to 4GB of RAM. First announced almost a year ago, the Tinker Board 2 is finally available for $99 and up. Asus also offers a Tinker Board 2S model that’s pretty similar except that it has 16GB of eMMC storage. Prices for that model start at about $120.

  • Raspberry Pi Weekly Issue #371 - Sir Clive Sinclair, 1940 – 2021

    This week ended with the incredibly sad news of the passing of Sir Clive Sinclair. He was one of the founding fathers of home computing and got many of us at Raspberry Pi hooked on programming as kids. Join us in sharing your Sinclair computing memories with us on Twitter and our blog, and we’ll see you next week.

  • cuplTag battery-powered NFC tag logs temperature and humidity (Crowdfunding) - CNX Software

    Temperature and humidity sensors would normally connect to a gateway sending data to the cloud, the coin-cell battery-powered cuplTag NFC tag instead sends data to your smartphone after a tap. CulpTag is controlled by an MSP430 16-bit microcontroller from Texas Instruments which reads and stores sensor data regularly into an EEPROM, and the data can then be read over NFC with the tag returning an URL with the data from the sensor and battery, then display everything on the phone’s web browser (no app needed).

  • A first look at Microchip PolarFire SoC FPGA Icicle RISC-V development board - CNX Software

    Formally launched on Crowd Supply a little over a year ago, Microchip PolarFire SoC FPGA Icicle (codenamed MPFS-ICICLE-KIT-ES) was one of the first Linux & FreeBSD capable RISC-V development boards. The system is equipped with PolarFire SoC FPGA comprised a RISC-V CPU subsystem with four 64-bit RISC-V (RV64GC) application cores, one 64-bit RISC-V real-time core (RV64IMAC), as well as FPGA fabric. Backers of the board have been able to play with it for several months ago, but Microchip is now sending the board to more people for evaluation/review, and I got one of my own to experiment with. That’s good to have a higher-end development board instead of the usual hobbyist-grade board. Today, I’ll just have a look at the kit content and main components on the board before playing with Linux and FPGA development tools in an upcoming or two posts.

  • What is IoT device management?

    Smart devices are everywhere around us. We carry one in our pocket, watch movies on another while a third cooks us dinner. Every day there are thousands of new devices connecting to the Internet. Research shows that by 2025, more than 150,000 IoT devices will come online every minute. With such vast numbers it is impossible to keep everything in working order just on your own. This brings the need for IoT device management. But what is IoT device management? To answer this question we first need to understand what the Internet of Things (IoT) is.

  • Beelink U59 mini PC with Intel Celeron N5095 Jasper Lake coming soon - Liliputing

    Beelink says the system ships with Windows 10, but it should also supports Linux.

  • Beelink U59 Celeron N5095 Jasper Lake mini PC to ship with 16GB RAM, 512GB SSD - CNX Software

    Beelink U59 is an upcoming Jasper Lake mini PC based on the Intel Celeron N5095 15W quad-core processor that will ship with up to 16GB RAM, and 512 GB M.2 SSD storage. The mini PC will also offer two 4K HDMI 2.0 ports, a Gigabit Ethernet port, WiFi 5, as well as four USB 3.0 ports, and support for 2.5-inch SATA drives up to 7mm thick.

Graphics: Mesa, KWinFT, and RADV

  • Experimenting Is Underway For Rust Code Within Mesa - Phoronix

    Longtime Mesa developer Karol Herbst who has worked extensively on the open-source NVIDIA "Nouveau" driver as well as the OpenCL/compute stack while being employed by Red Hat is now toying with the idea of Rust code inside Mesa.  Karol Herbst has begun investigating how Rust code, which is known for its memory safety and concurrency benefits, could be used within Mesa. Ultimately he's evaluating how Rust could be used inside Mesa as an API implementation as well as for leveraging existing Mesa code by Rust. 

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  • KWinFT Continues Working On WLROOTS Render, Library Split

    KWinFT as a fork of KDE's KWin X11/Wayland compositor code continues making progress on driving fundamental display improvements and ironing out the Wayland support.  KWinFT has been transitioning to use WLROOTS for its Wayland heavy-lifting and that process remains ongoing. KWinFT has also been working on splitting up its library code to make it more manageable and robust.  Among the features still desired by KWinFT and to be worked on include input methods, graphical tablet support, and PipeWire video stream integration. Currently there are two full-time developers working on the project but they hope to scale up to four to five full-time developers. 

  • Raytracing Starting to Come Together – Bas Nieuwenhuizen – Open Source GPU Drivers

    I am back with another status update on raytracing in RADV. And the good news is that things are finally starting to come together. After ~9 months of on and off work we’re now having games working with raytracing.

  • Multiple Games Are Now Working With RADV's Ray-Tracing Code - Phoronix

    Not only is Intel progressing with its open-source ray-tracing driver support but the Mesa Radeon Vulkan driver "RADV" has been rounding out its RT code too and now has multiple games correctly rendering. Bas Nieuwenhuizen has been spearheading the RADV work on Vulkan ray-tracing support and after more than a half-year tackling it things are starting to fall into place nicely.Games such as Quake II RTX with native Vulkan ray-tracing are working along with the game control via VKD3D-Proton for going from Direct3D 12 DXR to Vulkan RT. Metro Exodus is also working while Ghostrunner and Doom Eternal are two games tested that are not yet working.

Audiocasts/Shows: Full Circle Weekly News, Juno Computers, Kali Linux 2021.3

today's howtos

  • Install LEMP Stack (Nginx, PHP and MariaDB) on Debian 11

    A LEMP Stack is a set of open-source software and frameworks or libraries that are used to host web applications on the internet. A stack consists of Linux operating system, Nginx web server, MariaDB/MySQL database server, and PHP language. A LEMP has good community support and is used in many highly scaled web applications around the globe. In this post, we will show you how to install the LEMP stack on Debian 11.

  • Linux: Install automatic package updates for Debian, Ubuntu, Raspi OS & Co.
  • Organize your Magic: The Gathering decks with Magic Assistant | Opensource.com

    It remains popular today because of its great flexibility. With more than 25,000 unique cards published over nearly three decades, there are enough cards for players to build hundreds of different decks for surprisingly unique gameplay experiences. Along with this flexibility, however, there comes a cost: many Magic: The Gathering players collect lots of cards so they can construct lots of different decks, which in turn lets them focus on different win conditions and try out different strategies. It can be quite a job to keep track of 1,000 cards when you only need 60 to 100 for a deck, but the open source application Magic Assistant makes managing your Magic collection easy.

  • Kubernetes admission control with validating webhooks | Red Hat Developer

    This article describes how to write, configure, and install a simple Kubernetes validating admission webhook. The webhook intercepts and validates PrometheusRule object creation requests to prevent users from creating rules with invalid fields. A key benefit of this approach is that your clusters will only contain prevalidated user-defined rules, resulting in uncluttered configuration across environments. Additionally, imagine there is an external alerting system that leverages fields in these customer-provided rules to make alerting decisions. It is important to ensure the rules are properly formatted, so the alerts are forwarded to the appropriate teams with the correct information. The example here is quite simple, but it can serve as a starting point to cleaner Prometheus installations with minimal errors.

  • GNU Linux Debian – how to create RAID10 (mdadm software raid, basic benchmarks 4x Hitachi HGST Ultrastar 7K4000)
  • How To Install phpBB on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install phpBB on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. For those of you who didn’t know, phpBB is an open-source bulletin board package written in PHP. PhpBB can instantly establish a dedicated space for people to gather and communicate. It also supports popular database engines (MySQL, Oracle Database, PostgreSQL, etc.), flat message structures, hierarchical sub-forums, user groups, full-text search, plugins, and email notifications. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step-by-step installation of phpBB on Ubuntu 20.04 (Focal Fossa). You can follow the same instructions for Ubuntu 18.04, 16.04, and any other Debian-based distribution like Linux Mint.

  • How to play games with Itch.io on Linux

    Itch.io is a website that allows independent developers to host, sell and distribute their video games. It is widely known for helping get indie games off the ground. Here’s how to play games with Itch.io on Linux!

  • Get healthy reminders on the Linux desktop using Stretchly

    Stretchly is an app that you can install on the Linux desktop to remind you to stand up, stretch and relax while working. In this guide, we’ll show you how to install Stretchly and how to use it too.