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Debian

Microsoft’s failed attempt on Debian packaging

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Microsoft
Debian

I dared to download and play around with the files, only to get shocked how incompetent Microsoft is in packaging.

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Also: Tails 3.7.1 Linux Distribution Released | Brings Tor Browser to 7.5.5 and Security Updates

Tails 3.7.1 is out

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Security
Debian

This release fixes many security issues and users should upgrade as soon as possible.

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Also:

Devuan ASCII 2.0.0 stable

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Debian

Dear Init Freedom Lovers

Once again the Veteran Unix Admins salute you!

We are happy to announce that Devuan GNU+Linux 2.0 ASCII Stable is
finally available.

Devuan is a GNU+Linux distribution committed to providing a universal,
stable, dependable, free software operating system that uses and
promotes alternatives to systemd and its components.

Devuan 2.0 ASCII runs on several architectures. Installer CD and DVD
ISOs, as well as desktop-live and minimal-live ISOs, are available for
i386 and amd64. Ready-to-use images can be downloaded for a number of
ARM platforms and SOCs, including Raspberry Pi, BeagleBone, OrangePi,
BananaPi, OLinuXino, Cubieboard, Nokia and Motorola mobile phones, and
several Chromebooks, as well as for Virtualbox/QEMU/Vagrant.

The Devuan 2.0 ASCII installer ISOs offer a variety of Desktop
Environments including Xfce, KDE, MATE, Cinnamon, LXQt, with others
available post-install. The expert install mode now offers a choice of
either SysVinit or OpenRC as init system. In addition, there are
options for "Console productivity" with hundreds of CLI and TUI utils,
as well as a minimal base system ideal for servers. The minimal-live
image provides a full-featured console-based system with a particular
focus on accessibility.

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Also: Talk about the Debian GNU/Linux riscv64 port at RISC-V workshop

Debian on a synthesizer

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Debian
HowTos

Bela is a low latency optimized platform for audio applications built using Debian and Xenomai, running on a BeagleBoard Black. I recently stumbled upon this platform while skimming through a modular synthesizer related forum. Bela has teamed up with the guys at Rebel Technologies to build a Bela based system in eurorack module format, called Salt. Luckily enough, I managed to secure a unit for my modular synthesizer.

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Debian vs Ubuntu, Debian Linux 7 EoL

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Debian vs Ubuntu

    Ubuntu and Debian are two of the most popular Linux distributions in history. Aside from that, they're very closely related, making it hard for new Linux users to sort out the differences between the two.

    While, many things may appear to be similar, or even the same, with these powerhouse distributions, there are some sizable differences between them.

  • Debian Linux 7 Long Term Support reached end-of-life

    The Debian Linux version 7 (codenamed “Wheezy”) support ended on 31st May 2018. It was initial release on May 4, 2013. Each LTS ( initial release on May 4, 2013) support lasts for five years. It means Debian project will not provide any security updates for Debian 7. As Debian Linux 7 Long Term support ends, hence you must upgrade your system to keep it secure. This page list all essentials steps to update your system from Debian 7 to Debian 8.

Debian, Ubuntu and Linux Mint

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Markus Koschany: My Free Software Activities in May 2018

    Welcome to gambaru.de. Here is my monthly report that covers what I have been doing for Debian. If you’re interested in Java, Games and LTS topics, this might be interesting for you.

  • My Free Software Activities in May 2018

    My monthly report covers a large part of what I have been doing in the free software world. I write it for my donors (thanks to them!) but also for the wider Debian community because it can give ideas to newcomers and it’s one of the best ways to find volunteers to work with me on projects that matter to me.

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 530

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 530 for the week of May 27 – June 2, 2018. The full version of this issue is available here.

  • Design and web team summary – 4 June 2018

    Welcome to the latest work and updates from the design and web team.

    We manage all web projects across Canonical – from www.ubuntu.com to the Juju GUI we help to bring beauty and consistency to all the web projects.

  • Linux Mint 19 betas arrive promising upgrade path from Mint 18.3

    Last week, the Linux Mint team announced that the betas for the Cinnamon, MATE, and Xfce editions of Linux Mint 19 would be made available today. Sticking to that promise, all three versions are available today and also come with a full log of the new features as well as an interesting tidbit regarding the upgrade path from Mint 18.3.

Debian: Raspberry Pi Image and Events in Brooklyn and Hamburg

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Debian
  • Looking for a new Raspberry Pi image maintainer

    I started building Raspberry Pi images because I thought there should be an easy, official way to install Debian on the Raspberry Pi.

    I still believe that, but I’m not actually using Debian on any of my Raspberry Pis anymore¹, so my personal motivation to do any work on the images is gone.

    On top of that, I realize that my commitments exceed my spare time capacity, so I need to get rid of responsibilities.

  • I'm hosting a small Debian BSP in Brooklyn

    The time has come for NYC Debian folks to gather. I've bravely volunteered to host a local bug squashing party (or BSP) in late June.

  • My LTS work in May 2018

    Organizing the MiniDebConf 2018 in Hamburg definitly took more time than planned, and then some things didnt work out as I had imagined so I could only start working on LTS at the end of May, and then there was this Alioth2Salsa migration too… But at least I managed to get started working on LTS gain \o/

Debian Leftovers

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Debian
  • Weblate 3.0

    Weblate 3.0 has been released today. It contains brand new access control module and 61 fixed issues.

  • Second GSoC Report

    A lot has happened since the last report. The main change in nacho was probably the move to integrate django-ldapdb. This abstracts a lot of operations one would have to do on the directory using bare ldap and it also provides the possibility of having the LDAP objects in the Django admin interface, as those are addressed as Django models. By using django-ldapdb i was able to remove around 90% of the self written ldap logic. The only functionality that still remains where i have to directly use the ldap library are the password operations. It would be possible to implement these features with django-ldapdb, but then i would have to integrate password hashing functionality into nacho and above all i would have to adjust the hashing function for every ldap server with a different hashing algorithm setting. This way the ldap server does the hashing and i won’t have to set the algorighm in two places.

  • Paul Wise: FLOSS Activities May 2018
  • Chris Lamb: Free software activities in May 2018

A Penguin tries out Secure-K OS, part I

Filed under
Reviews
Debian

As the name suggests (Secure Key), Secure-K OS is a live operating system, based on Debian 9 Stretch, meant to be run from any USB key and “developed with security in mind”, according to its developers, Mon-K Data Protection.

A couple of “hardware versions” of the operating system are being sold on the project website, which means that one can buy Secure-K OS already deployed into a hardware-encrypted USB key with a pin-pad. It feels geeky.

Because I cannot download that piece of hardware via my network (I guess you cannot as well), what I have actually downloaded is the system image file of Secure-K OS Lite, then written into a USB stick of mine.

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Debian and Derivatives

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Debian
  • More Vnlog demos

    More demos of vnlog and feedgnuplot usage! This is pretty pointless, but should be a decent demo of the tools at least. This is a demo, not documentation; so for usage details consult the normal docs.

    Each Wednesday night I join a group bike ride. This is an organized affair, and each week an email precedes the ride, very roughly describing the route. The two organizers alternate leading the ride each week, and consequently the emails alternate also. I was getting the feeling that some of the announcements show up in my mailbxo more punctually than others, and after a recent 20-minutes-before-the ride email, I decided this just had to be quantified.

    The emails all go to a google-group email. The google-groups people are a wheel-reinventing bunch, so talking to the archive can't be done with normal tools (NNTP? mbox files? No?). A brief search revealed somebody's home-grown tool to programmatically grab the archive:

  • First GSoC Report

    To whom it may concern, this is my report over the first few weeks of gsoc under the umbrella of the Debian project. I’m writing this on my way back from the minidebconf in Hamburg, which was a nice experience, maybe there will be another post about that Wink

    So, the goal of my GSOC project is to design and implement a new SSO solution for Debian. But that only touches one part of the projects deliveries. As you can read in the description Alexander Wirth originally posted in the Debian Wiki, the project consists of two parts, where the first one is the design and coding of a new backend and self-service interface for Debian guest users (this includes the accounts of Debian Maintainers).

  • Parrot 4.0 Ethical Hacking Linux Distro Released: Download Here To Get New Features

    Compared to its previous releases, Debian-based Parrot 4.0 ethical hacking distro has arrived with a lot more changes. The development team has called it an important milestone in the history of the project.

  • Kubuntu 18.04 Review: KDE Plasma at its Best

    Kubuntu 18.04 LTS has been released and we take it for a test drive in this detailed review of Kubuntu 18.04.

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Automatically Change Wallpapers in Linux with Little Simple Wallpaper Changer

Here is a tiny script that automatically changes wallpaper at regular intervals in your Linux desktop. Read more

EU Law Threatens Free/Open Source Software

  • EU votes on copyright law that could kill memes and open source software
    The European Union has passed an initial vote in favour of the Copyright Directive, a legislation experts say "threatens the internet". As reported by Wired, the mandate is designed to update internet copyright law but contains two controversial clauses. Ultimately, it could force prominent online platforms to censor their users' content before it's posted—which could impact everyone from meme creators to open source software designers and livestreamers. Despite passing a vote yesterday—held by the EU's Legal Affairs Committee (JURI)—the directive needs parliamentary approval before becoming law.
  • The EU Parliament Legal Affairs Committee Vote on Directive on Copyright, David Clark Cause and IBM's Call for Code, Equus' New WHITEBOX OPEN Server Platform and More
    Yesterday the European Parliament Legal Affairs Committee voted in favor of "the most harmful provisions of the proposed Directive on Copyright in the Digital Single Market", Creative Commons reports. The provisions include the Article 11 "link tax", which requires "anyone using snippets of journalistic content to first get a license or pay a fee to the publisher for its use online." The committee also voted in favor of Article 13, which "requires online platforms to monitor their users' uploads and try to prevent copyright infringement through automated filtering." There are still several steps to get through before the Directive is completely adopted. See EDRi for more information.
  • GitHub: Changes to EU copyright law could derail open source distribution
  • The E.U. votes to make memes essentially illegal
    On Wednesday, European Parliament’s Committee on Legal Affairs voted to essentially make memes illegal. The decision came as part of the approval process for the innocuously named “Article 13,” which would require larger sites to scan all user uploads using content recognition technology in an attempt to flag any and all remotely copyrighted material in photos, text, music, videos, and more. Meaning memes using stills from copyrighted films could be auto-blocked, along with remixes of viral videos, and basically anything that’s popular on live-streaming sites like Twitch.
  • Europe takes step towards 'censorship machines' for internet uploads
    A key committee at the European Parliament has voted for a new provision in a legislative act that forces tech giants and other online platforms to share revenues with publishers. It is known as Article 13, and is part of an updating of the Copyright Directive. Article 13 proposes that large websites use “content recognition technologies” to scan for copyrighted materials, though it doesn’t explain how this works in practice. This means texts, sounds and even code which get uploaded have to go through an automated filtering system, potentially threatening the creation of memes and open-source software developers.

The EC’s Expected Decision Against Android Is an Unfortunate Attack on Open Source Software

The European Commission (“EC”) is preparing to release its decision against Android, and its framing of the issues makes clear that successful open source software will have a hard time in Europe. In its Statement of Objections, the Commission signaled that Apple’s iOS, Android’s fiercest rival, would be excluded from the market definition because it is closed source and not available to other hardware makers. The decision is expected to declare unlawful strategies to monetize a free product, provide a consistent user experience to customers expecting the Google brand, and to maintain code consistency to minimize problems for developers using the platform. The decision is not expected to contain any indication on how open source platform developers can solve these problems that are fundamental to their success. Read more

Google, IBM and Microsoft

  • Five Common Chromebook Myths Debunked
    When Chromebooks first came out in 2011, they were basically just low-spec laptops that could access web apps – fine for students maybe, but not to be regarded as serious computers. While they’ve become more popular (the low cost, simplicity, and dependability appeal to businesses and education systems), as of 2018 Chromebooks still haven’t managed to become widely accepted as a Windows/Apple/Linux alternative. That may be about to change. The humble Chromebook has gotten a lot of upgrades, so let’s get ourselves up to speed on some things that just aren’t true anymore. [...] The 2011 Chrome OS was pretty bare-bones, but it’s gone to the opposite extreme since then. Not only is it steadily blurring the line between Chrome and Android, it can now install and run some Windows programs as well, at the same time as a Chrome and an Android app, if you like. And hey, while you’re at it, why not open a Linux app as well? You can already install Linux on a Chromebook if you want, but one of the next versions of Chrome OS is going to include a Linux virtual machine accessible right from your desktop (which is already possible, just not built-in and user-friendly). In sum, Chrome OS has gone from barely being an operating system to one that can run apps from four other OSes at the same time.
  • Like “IBM’s Work During the Holocaust”: Inside Microsoft, Growing Outrage Over a Contract with ICE
  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E15 – Fifteen Minutes - Ubuntu Podcast
    ...Microsoft getting into hot water over their work with US Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Plus we round up the community news.