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Debian

Tails 1.0: A bootable Linux distro that protects your privacy

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Reviews
Debian

Once you've got it going, you'll find that Tails' default desktop is the popular GNOME Linux desktop. If you (or your users) aren't comfortable with GNOME, Tails can masquerade as the more familiar Windows XP.

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Testing Ubuntu, Debian and LMDE on my new notebook

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Debian
Ubuntu

I recently picked up an Acer V5-131 at a good price here in Switzerland. In my previous two posts about it I have described configuring and upgrading Windows 8, and installing openSuSE, Fedora and Linux Mint on it. There is at least one obvious omission from that list of Linux distributions — Ubuntu. So this post will focus on installing that, plus Linux Mint Debian Edition (MATE) and the Debian testing distribution (jessie).

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Debian 7.5 “Wheezy” Live CD Now Available for Download

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Debian

When a new point release of Debian is made available, the Live CD version of that distro is not accessible to users right away. It usually takes about a week for the Debian Live CD team to put together the new releases.

Even if the new Live images have been released, this is no reason to install Debian from scratch. If you already have Debian installed, the simple upgrade process will keep you up to date.

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Debian 8.0 Jessie To Likely Target The Linux 3.16 Kernel

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GNU
Linux
Debian

Ben Hutchings began extrapolating data of stable kernel releases and around the time of the Debian Jessie freeze will likely be the Linux 3.17 release, but that might be too close for comfort. However, at the same time, the earlier the Jessie kernel is frozen the more hardware enablement back-porting and other fixes that will need to queue up for this next major Debian GNU/Linux release.

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APT (Advanced Package Tool) 1.0.3 Is Out

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Debian

Advanced Package Tool was launched back in 1998, and 16 years later it finally reached version 1.0. Now we already have version 1.0.3, which means that the developers intend to pick up the pace a little with the new builds.

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Easily Fix Firefox 29

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GNU
Linux
Moz/FF
Debian

Just as a meaningless addendum, I actually don’t use Firefox itself, but rather Debian Linux’s “Iceweasel”, which is exactly the same, the only difference being the logo. Debian has insanely high standards for what constitutes “free”, which is in fact laudable but leads to things like this renaming because Firefox’s logo isn’t as completely free as it could be. It causes a lot of confusion for Debian neophytes in the help forums, that’s for sure. I kinda like being an Iceweasel user. Cool name. There’s also Icedove (renamed Thunderbird email program) and my favorite, Iceape (renamed SeaMonkey internet suite). Speaking of SeaMonkey, did you know this even existed? Yes, it’s still possible to use a full featured “internet suite” that includes a web browser, email and newsgroups client, and HTML editor all in one package. Pretty cool, and free of course, and maybe even useful for some folks. All of these things are from the aforementioned fine folks at Mozilla, which is what rose out of the ashes of Netscape years ago. I loved Netscape!

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Debian: Call for help from KDE Team

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KDE
Debian

For quite a while now the KDE team has been severely understaffed. We maintain
a lot of packages, with many different kinds of bugs, but we don’t have enough
people to do all the work that needs to be done. We have tools that help us
automate the update to new upstream releases, but that’s just the tip of the
iceberg of our work and so we are writing to invite more people to get
involved in the team and help us get KDE software in Debian into better shape.

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Parsix GNU/Linux 6.0r0 Is an Interesting Mix of Debian and GNOME

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GNU
Linux
GNOME
Debian

Parsix GNU/Linux, a live and installation DVD based on Debian, aiming to provide a ready-to-use, easy-to-install desktop and laptop-optimized operating system, is now at version 6.0r0 and is ready for testing.

The developers' ultimate goal is to offer users an easy-to-use OS based on Debian's Wheezy branch, which makes use of the latest stable release of GNOME desktop environment.

"This version ships with GNOME Shell 3.10.3, and Linux 3.12.17 kernel built on top of rock solid Debian Wheezy (7.0) platform. All base packages have been synchronized with Debian Wheezy repositories as of April 17, 2014. This version comes with a systemd based live boot mode," reads the official announcement...

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Tails 1.0 released

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Debian

Version 1.0 of the Tails ("the amnesic incognito live system") distribution has been released. Tails is a Debian-based distribution intended for anonymous access to the net. The 1.0 release evidently brings few new features; the point, instead, is to indicate that Tails has reached a new level of stability.

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Tiny i.MX286 SBC runs Debian on less than a Watt

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Debian

Technologic announced a tiny, open spec SBC that runs Linux on Freescale’s i.MX286 SoC, supports industrial temperatures, and draws as little as 0.5W.

The “TS-7400-V2″ single-board computer is a lower-cost, faster, drop-in replacement for the first-generation TS-7400, says Technologic Systems. The single board computer maintains the earlier model’s 4.7 x 2.9 x 0.8-inch dimensions, general board layout, and Debian Linux OS support, says the company.

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More in Tux Machines

5 Kubernetes must-reads: Tips and trends

Kubernetes is having a moment – but don’t look for its popularity to wane anytime soon. As enterprises move beyond experimenting and start working in earnest with containers, the number of containers multiply: So do the manual chores. Orchestration tools like Kubernetes add automated help. “Running a few standalone containers for development purposes won’t rob your IT team of time or patience: A standards-based container runtime by itself will do the job,” Red Hat technology evangelist Gordon Haff recently noted. “But once you scale to a production environment and multiple applications spanning many containers, it’s clear that you need a way to coordinate those containers to deliver the individual services. As containers accumulate, complexity grows. Eventually, you need to take a step back and group containers along with the coordinated services they need, such as networking, security, and telemetry.” (See Haff’s full article, How enterprise IT uses Kubernetes to tame container complexity.) Read more

Australian Securities Exchange completes Red Hat migration

The Australian Securities Exchange (ASX) has completed the migration of "mission-critical" legacy applications to the Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (JBoss EAP). ASX first deployed JBoss EAP in 2011 to modernise its legacy technologies and to facilitate the introduction of new web applications after it realised its legacy application server platform was becoming increasingly inconsistent, unstable, and expensive. After the initial ASX Online Company migration was complete in 2012, ASX used JBoss EAP to build the ASX.com API, as well as its Sharemarket Game, which gives players the opportunity to learn how the share market works. Read more

Programming/Development: GAPID 1.0 and Atom 1.23

  • Diagnose and understand your app's GPU behavior with GAPID
  • GAPID 1.0 Released As Google's Cross-Platform Vulkan Debugger
    Back in March we wrote about GAPID as a new Google-developed Vulkan debugger in its early stages. Fast forward to today, GAPID 1.0 has been released for debugging Vulkan apps/games on Linux/Windows/Android as well as OpenGL ES on Android. GAPID is short for the Graphics API Debugger and allows for analyzing rendering and performance issues with ease using its GUI interface. GAPID also allows for easily experimenting with code changes to see their rendering impact and allows for offline debugging. GAPID has its own format and capturetrace utility for capturing traces of Vulkan (or GLES on Android too) programs for replaying later on with GAPID.
  • Hackable Text Editor Atom 1.23 Adds Better Compatibility for External Git Tools
    GitHub released Atom 1.23, the monthly update of the open-source and cross-platform hackable text editor application loved by numerous developers all over the world. Including a month's worth of enhancements, Atom 1.23 comes with the ability for packages to register URI handler functions, which can be invoked whenever the user visits a URI that starts with "atom://package-name/," and a new option to hide certain commands in the command palette when registering them via "atom.commands.add." Atom 1.23 also improves the compatibility with external Git tools, as well as the performance of the editor by modifying the behavior of several APIs to no longer make callbacks more than once in a text buffer transaction. Along with Atom 1.23, GitHub also released Teletype 0.4.0, a tool that allows developers to collaborate simultaneously on multiple files.

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