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Debian

Tails 4.4.1 is out

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Debian

This release is an emergency release to fix security vulnerabilities in Tor Browser and Tor.

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Ubuntu and Debian Leftovers

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • amnimo Inc. Starts Development of High-performance, Robust LTE Gateway (Edge Gateway) for Industrial Use

    Customer app development is possible on the Ubuntu OS; in addition, software development kits are provided for partners.

  • Download Ubuntu 19.04 Disco Dingo

    Ubuntu 19.04 Disco Dingo’s best and worst changes occur at the desktop level with an upgrade to GNOME 3.32. The new GNOME desktop release is important because the GNOME Desktop Environment is gaining significant improvements in speed. Frame rates, smoother start-up animations, faster icon load times, GPU usage reduction, etc. are all part of this new update. It now also includes the latest version of Nautilus. Meaning features like file favorites and elegant resizing are on offer.

    [...]

    Although the new update doesn’t include much in the way of new features for displays there’s an important introduction. Up until now, Ubuntu Linux hasn’t included fractional scaling support. This ability is only useful for those who use larger HiDPI displays. In Ubuntu 19.04 the feature might come in the form of a hidden option, so you’ll need to enable it. With fractional scaling, users can fine-tune their displays more granularly. You don’t have to set the scale to 1 and wish you could make things either fractionally smaller or bigger. Now you can simply make things either fractionally smaller or bigger.

  • Dima Kogan: org-babel for documentation

    So I just gave a talk at SCaLE 18x about numpysane and gnuplotlib, two libraries I wrote to make using numpy bearable. With these two, it's actually quite nice!

  • Sylvestre Ledru: Some clang rebuild results (8.0.1, 9.0.1 & 10rc2)

    As part of the LLVM release cycle, I am continuing rebuilding the Debian archive with clang instead of gcc to evaluate potential regressions.

Debian Testing Is Enabling WireGuard Within Their Linux Kernel Build

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GNU
Linux
Security
Debian

Debian is the latest Linux distribution flipping on WireGuard within their kernel builds.

WireGuard is one of many prominent additions to the Linux 5.6 kernel. After being in development for years and being available as an out-of-tree DKMS module, Linux 5.6 and moving forward now have the code mainlined. The likes of Ubuntu 20.04 LTS are also shipping with WireGuard back-ported to their kernel.

Adding to the momentum for this open-source secure VPN tunnel, WireGuard is now enabled within Debian testing's kernel build. Up to now the WireGuard module was not being built as part of their kernel configuration. But now it's flipped on within their Kconfig that landed in Debian's Linux kernel tree overnight.

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Meet DebianDog – Puppy sized Debian Linux

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Linux
Debian

Recently I stumbled upon an intriguing Linux project. This project aims to create small live CDs for Debian and Debian-based systems, similar to the Puppy Linux project. Let’s take a look at DebianDog.

As it says on the tin, DebianDog “is a small Debian Live CD shaped to look like Puppy and act like Puppy. Debian structure and Debian behaviour are untouched and Debian documentation is 100% valid for DebianDog. You have access to all Debian repositories using apt-get or synaptic.”

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LMDE 4 “Debbie” released!

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Debian

LMDE is a Linux Mint project which stands for “Linux Mint Debian Edition”. Its goal is to ensure Linux Mint would be able to continue to deliver the same user experience, and how much work would be involved, if Ubuntu was ever to disappear. LMDE is also one of our development targets, to guarantee the software we develop is compatible outside of Ubuntu.

LMDE aims to be as similar as possible to Linux Mint, but without using Ubuntu. The package base is provided by Debian instead.

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Also: Linux Mint Debian Edition 4 Released - Finally Supports SecureBoot, Home Encryption

Debian Social Announced! Developers can Collaborate and Contribute.

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Development
Debian

Debian Social: The Debian Social aims to run a few services under the domain “debian.social“. They said that their aim is to provide a safe place for Debian contributors. Debian.Social will help the contributor to showcase their work and share their work with other debian contributors. Users can collaborate with other users and help them to develop their contributions through the debian.social platform.

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Debian and Ubuntu/Canonical Leftovers

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Norbert Preining: Fixing mate-terminal URL highlighting

    One of the recent updates in Debian swept in changes so that mate-terminal couldn’t highlight URLs anymore (Debian bug report, upstream bug report). I got so fed up with this that I fixed it and send a pull request. Update Debian packages for amd64 Debian/sid are in my usual repo at https://www.preining.info/debian/.

  • Mike Gabriel: Time for home office! Time for X2Go?

    Most of us IT people should be in home office by now. If not, make sure you'll arrange that with your employers, cooperation partners, contractors, etc. Please help flatten the curve.

    X2Go as your Home Office solution

    If your computer at work runs a GNU/Linux desktop and you can SSH into it, then it might be time for you to try out X2Go [1]. Remote desktop access under GNU/Linux.

  • SBI Group unlocks infrastructure automation with secure, on-premises OpenStack cloud

    SBI BITS provides IT services and infrastructure to the SBI Group — Japan’s market leading financial services company group — which is made up of over 250 companies, and 6,000 employees.

    To increase time to market and meet heavy client requirements, SBI BITs was looking for alternative solutions beyond bare metal servers and decided upon OpenStack. After evaluating their existing suppliers, SBI BITS turned to Canonical to bring in the external support and expertise required to move into production with an economical, flexible solution.

Two men, one woman in race for Debian project leader's post

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Debian

Three developers — two male, one female — have thrown their hats into the ring for the post of Debian project leader for 2020-21, with the poll set to be held online from 5 April to 18 April.

The trio — Jonathan Carter, Sruthi Chandran and Brian Gupta — have all announced the platforms on which they will run and have time to campaign until 4 April. The new project leader's term will begin on 21 April.

Carter, 38, who did not specify how long he has been a developer, has cited four points in his platform: continuing to do what the project does well, making Debian attractive to contributors, reducing the bottlenecks that affect contributors and improving the project's housekeeping.

Among the things that Debian does well, Carter has listed technical excellence, the promotion of free software, packaging of software, new released and updating the stable distribution. Debian has three lines of development: stable (the last release, which gets security updates), testing (more recent software comes into this branch after spending some time in the third branch, unstable), and unstable which, as the name implies is just that, receives all the latest software and often breaks.

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AcademiX : Debian-based Linux distro designed for education

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Debian

AcademiX is a Debian-based Linux distribution developed explicitly for education purposes. It comes bundled with free, open-source teaching and learning software to use for primary education to the university level.

Since the AcademiX is primarily meant for educational purposes, it lacks most of the sophisticated features and tools present in a typical Linux distro. However, you can still install them via its powerful Mate Terminal.

Before getting down to features, let us look at how you can download and install this unique OS.

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Also: Norbert Preining: Brave broken (on Debian?)

Debian Installer Bullseye Alpha 2 release

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Debian

The Debian Installer team is pleased to announce the second release candidate of the installer for Debian 11 Bullseye.

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Also: Debian Installer Bullseye Alpha 2 Released With Linux 5.4 + New Device Support

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More in Tux Machines

Programming Literature: Jussi Pakkanen on Meson, Shing Lyu on Rust and "25 Best JavaScript Books for Newbie and Professional"

  • Jussi Pakkanen: Meson manual sales status and price adjustment

    The second part (marked with a line) indicates when I was a guest on CppCast talking about Meson and the book. As an experiment I created a time limited discount coupon so that all listeners could buy it with €10 off. As you can tell from the graph it did have an immediate response, which again proves that marketing and visibility are the things that actually matter when trying to sell any product. After that we have the "new normal", which means no sales at all. I don't know if this is caused by the coronavirus isolation or whether this is the natural end of life for the product (hopefully the former but you can never really tell in advance).

  • Shing Lyu: Lessons learned in writing my first book

    You might have noticed that I didn’t update this blog frequently in the past year. It’s not because I’m lazy, but I focused all my creative energy on writing this book: Practical Rust Projects. The book is now available on Apress, Amazon and O’Reilly. In this post, I’ll share some of the lessons I learned in writing this book. Although I’ve been writing Rust for quite a few years, I haven’t really studied the internals of the Rust language itself. Many of the Rust enthusiasts whom I know seem to be having much fun appreciating how the language is designed and built. But I take more joy in using the language to build tangible things. Therefore, I’ve been thinking about writing a cookbook-style book on how to build practical projects with Rust, ever since I finished the video course Building Reusable Code with Rust. Out of my surprise, I received an email from Steve Anglin, an acquisition editor from Apress, in April 2019. He initially asked me to write a book on the RustPython project. But the project was still growing rapidly thanks to the contributors. I’ve already lost grip on the overall architecture, so I can’t really write much about it. So I proposed the topic I have in mind to Steve. Fortunately, the editorial board accepted my proposal, and we decided to write two books: one for general Rust projects and one for web-related Rust projects. Since this is my first time writing a book that will be published in physical form (or as The Rust Book put it, “dead tree form”), I learned quite a lot throughout the process. Hopefully, these points will help you if you are considering or are already writing your own book.

  • The 25 Best JavaScript Books for Newbie and Professional

    JavaScript is a programming language that is object-oriented and used to make dynamic web pages by adding interactive effects. This client-side scripting language is used by almost 94.5% web pages available on the internet. The language is very easy but also known as one of the most misunderstood programming languages. You should choose the right guidelines so that you can get all the answers to your questions related to JavaScript. Here we will provide you with a list of the best Javascript books so that you can learn JavaScript and never become confused.

today's howtos

This is my shoestring photography setup for image editing

Saving money is not the only major benefit of using inexpensive hardware and free open-source software. Somewhat surprisingly, the more important benefit for me personally is peace of mind. My primary machine is a 9-year old ThinkPad X220 with 4GB RAM and 120GB SSD. I bought it on eBay for around 200 euros, plus about 30 euros for a 120GB SSD. The digiKam application I use for most of my photo management and processing needs cost exactly zero. (I’m the author of the digiKam Recipes book.) I store my entire photo library on a USB 3.0 3TB Toshiba Canvio hard disk I bought for around 113 euros. If any component of my hardware setup fails, I can replace it without any significant impact on my budget. I don’t have to worry about a company deciding to squeeze more money out of me by either forcing me into a paid upgrade or a subscription plan, and I sleep better knowing that I own the software crucial for my photographic workflow. You might think that managing and processing RAW files and photos on a relatively old machine with a paltry amount of RAM is unbearably slow, but it’s not. While Windows would bring the ThinkPad X220 to its knees, the machine briskly runs openSUSE Linux with the KDE graphical desktop environment. The word Linux may send some photographers away screaming, but a modern Linux system is hardly more complicated in use than Windows. Read more

elementary OS: Hera Updates for March, 2020

Fresh on the heels of the AppCenter for Everyone Remote Sprint, we still managed to push out a good amount of updates over the course of March (and early April), bundled up in an OS 5.1.3 update. Let’s dive into what’s new. We continued our quest to make Code the best editor for elementary OS this month. A file’s Git status now shows in its tooltip in the project sidebar, making it easier to understand what the status icons mean—especially if you’re colorblind or just don’t remember. We also added an option for explicit case-sensitive find/replace for those times when you want to find or replace the word foo but not Foo. Read more Also: elementary OS 5.1.3 New Features Revealed