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Debian

Debian: Indexing Debian's buildinfo, Latest Development Reports (LTS)

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Development
Debian
  • Indexing Debian's buildinfo

    Debian is currently collecting buildinfo but they are not very conveniently searchable. Eventually Chris Lamb's buildinfo.debian.net may solve this problem, but in the mean time, I decided to see how practical indexing the full set of buildinfo files is with sqlite.

  • My free software activities, August 2017

    This is my monthly Debian LTS report. This month I worked on a few major packages that took a long time instead of multiple smaller issues. Affected packages were Mercurial, libdbd-mysql-perl and Ruby.

  • F/LOSS activity, August 2017
  • My free software activities, August 2017

    This is my monthly Debian LTS report. This month I worked on a few major packages that took a long time instead of multiple smaller issues. Affected packages were Mercurial, libdbd-mysql-perl and Ruby.

Debian, Ubuntu, Linux Mint

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Monthly News – August 2017

    First, I would like to thank you for your donations and for your support. It’s a real pleasure to work on improving Linux Mint not only because it’s fun to develop and integrate software and technology but also because we see how happy and excited you are about what we do.. and that’s an amazing feeling for us.

  • Ubuntu MATE 17.10 Beta 1

    We are preparing Ubuntu MATE 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) for distribution on October 19th, 2017 With this Beta pre-release, you can see what we are trying out in preparation for our next (stable) version.

  • Free software activities in August 2017
  • New Debian Developers and Maintainers (July and August 2017)

    The following contributors got their Debian Developer accounts in the last two months:

    Ross Gammon (rossgammon)
    Balasankar C (balasankarc)
    Roland Fehrenbacher (rfehren)
    Jonathan Cristopher Carter (jcc)

    The following contributors were added as Debian Maintainers in the last two months:

    José Gutiérrez de la Concha
    Paolo Greppi
    Ming-ting Yao Wei
    Boyuan Yang
    Paul Hardy
    Fabian Wolff
    Moritz Schlarb
    Shengjing Zhu

  • Ubuntu Rally in NYC

    The Ubuntu Rally, taking place in New York City September 25th-29th, is a forward-thinking five day software hackathon attended by major software vendors, Ubuntu developers working at every level of the stack, and community contributors.

Debian and Ubuntu: Free Software Activities and Artful Aardvark Development

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Debian
Ubuntu

Elive 2.9.8 beta released

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Debian

The Elive Team is proud to announce the release of the beta version 2.9.8

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Debian and Ubuntu: Debate About Proprietary Services, Ubuntu Looks and More

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Debian debates software for proprietary services

    Distributions like Debian have a clear policy on the software they ship; as a general rule, only free software can be considered for inclusion. How that policy should be applied to software that interacts with proprietary systems is not entirely clear, though. A recent discussion on a package that interfaces with a proprietary network service seems unlikely to lead to any changes in policy, but it does highlight a fault line within the Debian community.

    Back in February, Jonas Smedegaard filed a bug against the "certspotter" package, complaining that the package's description advertises the proprietary SSLMate service. On August 4, the maintainer of that package, Faidon Liambotis, got around to answering the bug, saying that the description is helpful for users searching for the package and will not be removed. At that point, Smedegaard took the discussion to the debian-project mailing list in an attempt to rally the Debian developer community against the offending package description.

  • Install Numix Theme And Icons in Ubuntu/Linux Mint
  • Violet Comeback theme Gives A Nice Dark Look To Ubuntu

    Violet-comeback theme is the GTK2/GTK3 counterpart to the Qt5/KDE color scheme "Violet Comeback". It was mainly designed to make GTK applications match with KDE Violet color scheme, but it is also compatible with Gnome, Unity, Xfce, Cinnamon, Mate and so on. As creator mentioned this theme is based on Numix and generated with oomox. Since this theme is in active development some issues exist in the GTK3 version: there are no borders at all on some windows and no shadow, which make the look a bit too flat. The windows cannot be handled properly. If you find any other bug in the theme then report it and hopefully it will get fixed.

  • Exploring snappy package manager. Why it is awesome and how to get started.
  • Ubuntu 16.04.3 Point Release, A Short Review & Upgrade Howto

    Ubuntu Xenial Point Release 3, or 16.04.3, has been released at 03 August 2017. Here's some review, download links, and how to upgrade from 16.04 or 14.04.

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Debian and Ubuntu Leftovers

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Debian
Ubuntu

Debian, Ubuntu, and Black Lab

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Debian Policy call for participation -- August 2017

    At the Debian Policy BoF at DebConf17, Solveig suggested that we could post summaries of recent activity in policy bugs to Planet Debian, as a kind of call for participation. Russ Allbery had written a script to generate such a summary some time ago, but it couldn’t handle the usertags the policy team uses to progress bugs through the policy changes process. Today I enhanced the script to handle usertags and I’m pleased to be able to post a summary of our bugs.

  • LXD: Weekly status #11
  • Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.0.3 Ubuntu-based operating system now available

    The perfect Linux distribution doesn't exist. Take it from someone that does a lot of distro-hopping -- you will find yourself searching forever. Instead, it is wise to find a Linux-based operating system that meets your needs and try to stick with it. After all, constantly fiddling with various distributions will just drain your energy and steal your time.

    With that said, Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.0.3 is now available. Should you download it? Well, if you are not satisfied with your current Linux-based operating system, then maybe. I've got to tell you, this Ubuntu-based distro looks like a winner. It features modern versions of both Google Chrome and the Linux kernel, plus it offers support for many file systems. Despite being designed for organizations, it should serve as a great desktop OS for home users too.

  • Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.0.3 Brings Linux 4.10, Based on Ubuntu 16.04.3 LTS

    Black Lab Software's CEO Robert Dohnert informs Softpedia today on the immediate availability for download of what it would appear to be the third maintenance update to the Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11 operating system series.

    Based on the recently released Ubuntu 16.04.3 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system, Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.0.3 uses its HWE (Hardware Enablement) Linux 4.10.0-37 kernel and comes with up-to-date components, including LibreOffice 5.4, Google Chrome 60, Mozilla Thunderbird 52.3, Webmin 1.8, and Samba 4, as well as all the latest security patches from upstream.

Debian: DebConf17, DebCamp and More

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Debian

DebConf17 Reports

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Debian
  • Why TUF does not shine (for APT repositories)

    In DebConf17 there was a talk about The Update Framework, short TUF. TUF claims to be a plug-in solution to software updates, but while it has the same practical level of security as apt, it also has the same shortcomings, including no way to effectively revoke keys.

    TUF divides signing responsibilities into roles: A root role, a targets rule (signing stuff to download), a snapshots rule (signing meta data), and a time stamp rule (signing a time stamp file). There also is a mirror role for signing a list of mirrors, but we can ignore that for now. It strongly recommends that all keys except for timestamp and mirrors are kept offline, which is not applicable for APT repositories – Ubuntu updates the repository every 30 minutes, imagine doing that with offline keys. An insane proposal.

  • I went all the way to Montréal for DebConf17, and all I got was a new MUA

    On Sunday night I got back from Montréal, where I attended both DebCamp17 and DebConf17. It was a wonderful two weeks. All I really did was work on Debian for roughly eight hours per day, interspersed with getting to know both people I’ve been working with since I first began contributing to Debian in late 2015, and people I didn’t yet know. But this was all I really needed to be doing. There was no need to engage in distracting myself.

    I enjoyed the first week more. There were sufficiently few people present that you could know at least all of their faces, and interesting-sounding talks didn’t interrupt making progress on one’s own work or unblocking other people’s work. In the second week it was great to meet people who were only present for the second week, but it felt more like regular Debian, in that I was often waiting on other people or they were waiting on me.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Linux Users Discuss DRM 1 on 1 – Unleaded Hangout
    Linux Users Discuss DRM. Today my Brandon and I discuss encrypted media extensions, digital rights management and our freedom on the Linux desktop. So join Brandon and I as we as Linux Users Discuss DRM.
  • i965 Shader Cache Revised As It Still Might Squeeze Into Mesa 17.3
    Intel's Jordan Justen has sent out his third revision to the recently renewed patches for allowing an OpenGL on-disk shader cache for the "i965" Mesa driver. Just a few days back Jordan sent out a revised Intel shader cache implementation for this code that's long been baking on the Intel side but yet to be merged for mainline Mesa while the RadeonSI shader cache and co has been present now for many months.
  • Sunday Linux Gaming Wrap-up
  • retro-gtk: The Future, Marty!
    Let's come back to retro-gtk. In the previous articles I explained how bad retro-gtk was, what I did to start improving it and more importantly what I did to prepare the terrain for further development. This article will detail the aforementioned planed improvements!
  • Ikea’s Open-Source Showrooms
    Ikea Group will also roll out a new digital platform called 'Co-Create Ikea' which mimics its IT division's open-source software development, where customers have the chance help develop and test new products.
  • Glibc Picks Up Some More FMA Performance Optimizations
    The GNU C Library, glibc, has picked up support for some additional functions as FMA-optimized versions. The newest functions now getting the fused multiply-add (FMA) support are powf(), logf(), exp2f(), and log2f(). The FMA instruction set is present since Intel Haswell and AMD Piledriver generations and like past FMA optimizations, the benefits can be quite noticeable.
  • Landmark release of Termination of Transfer tool from Creative Commons and Authors Alliance
    For more than a decade, Creative Commons has developed and stewarded legal tools that give creators the opportunity to share their work on open terms. We have focused on tools that empower sharing at the moment of publication, leaving out an important group of creators: what about those who previously signed away their rights to their works long ago, but who now want to share on open terms under a CC license or renegotiate unfavorable publishing terms?
  • The recent catastrophic Wi-Fi vulnerability was in plain sight for 13 years behind a corporate paywall
    The recent Wi-Fi “KRACK” vulnerability, which allowed anyone to get onto a secure network (and which was quickly patched by reputable vendors), had been in plain sight behind a corporate-level paywall for 13 years. This raises a number of relevant, interesting, and uncomfortable questions.

Events: openSUSE.Asia Summit 2017, GStreamer Conference 2017, FSFE Assembly During 34C3

  • openSUSE.Asia Summit 2017 in Tokyo
  • GStreamer Conference 2017 Videos
    Taking place this weekend in Prague has been the 8th annual GStreamer Conference, which is preceding next week's Linux Foundation Embedded Linux Conference Europe.
  • Call for sessions at the FSFE assembly during 34C3
    With the CCC moving from Hamburg to Leipzig, there are not only logistic changes to be done but also some organisational changes. We are still figuring out the details, but in the context of this call, one of the major changes will be the loss of free available rooms to book for self-organised sessions. Instead, assemblies that match with each other are asked to cluster around 1 of several stages and use that as a common stage for self-organized sessions together. To make the most of this situation, the FSFE will for the first time not join the Noisy Square this year but form a new neighbourhood with other freedom fighting NGOs – in particular with our friends from European Digital Rights. However, at this point of time, we do not yet have more information about the concrete or final arrangements.

Android Leftovers

GNOME 3.28 Linux Desktop Environment Development Kicks Off with First Snapshot

GNOME developer Javier Jardón is kicking off the development of the GNOME 3.28 desktop environment with the first snapshot, GNOME 3.27.1, which is now available for public testing. Read more