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Debian

Debian on a synthesizer

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Debian
HowTos

Bela is a low latency optimized platform for audio applications built using Debian and Xenomai, running on a BeagleBoard Black. I recently stumbled upon this platform while skimming through a modular synthesizer related forum. Bela has teamed up with the guys at Rebel Technologies to build a Bela based system in eurorack module format, called Salt. Luckily enough, I managed to secure a unit for my modular synthesizer.

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Debian vs Ubuntu, Debian Linux 7 EoL

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Debian vs Ubuntu

    Ubuntu and Debian are two of the most popular Linux distributions in history. Aside from that, they're very closely related, making it hard for new Linux users to sort out the differences between the two.

    While, many things may appear to be similar, or even the same, with these powerhouse distributions, there are some sizable differences between them.

  • Debian Linux 7 Long Term Support reached end-of-life

    The Debian Linux version 7 (codenamed “Wheezy”) support ended on 31st May 2018. It was initial release on May 4, 2013. Each LTS ( initial release on May 4, 2013) support lasts for five years. It means Debian project will not provide any security updates for Debian 7. As Debian Linux 7 Long Term support ends, hence you must upgrade your system to keep it secure. This page list all essentials steps to update your system from Debian 7 to Debian 8.

Debian, Ubuntu and Linux Mint

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Markus Koschany: My Free Software Activities in May 2018

    Welcome to gambaru.de. Here is my monthly report that covers what I have been doing for Debian. If you’re interested in Java, Games and LTS topics, this might be interesting for you.

  • My Free Software Activities in May 2018

    My monthly report covers a large part of what I have been doing in the free software world. I write it for my donors (thanks to them!) but also for the wider Debian community because it can give ideas to newcomers and it’s one of the best ways to find volunteers to work with me on projects that matter to me.

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 530

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 530 for the week of May 27 – June 2, 2018. The full version of this issue is available here.

  • Design and web team summary – 4 June 2018

    Welcome to the latest work and updates from the design and web team.

    We manage all web projects across Canonical – from www.ubuntu.com to the Juju GUI we help to bring beauty and consistency to all the web projects.

  • Linux Mint 19 betas arrive promising upgrade path from Mint 18.3

    Last week, the Linux Mint team announced that the betas for the Cinnamon, MATE, and Xfce editions of Linux Mint 19 would be made available today. Sticking to that promise, all three versions are available today and also come with a full log of the new features as well as an interesting tidbit regarding the upgrade path from Mint 18.3.

Debian: Raspberry Pi Image and Events in Brooklyn and Hamburg

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Debian
  • Looking for a new Raspberry Pi image maintainer

    I started building Raspberry Pi images because I thought there should be an easy, official way to install Debian on the Raspberry Pi.

    I still believe that, but I’m not actually using Debian on any of my Raspberry Pis anymore¹, so my personal motivation to do any work on the images is gone.

    On top of that, I realize that my commitments exceed my spare time capacity, so I need to get rid of responsibilities.

  • I'm hosting a small Debian BSP in Brooklyn

    The time has come for NYC Debian folks to gather. I've bravely volunteered to host a local bug squashing party (or BSP) in late June.

  • My LTS work in May 2018

    Organizing the MiniDebConf 2018 in Hamburg definitly took more time than planned, and then some things didnt work out as I had imagined so I could only start working on LTS at the end of May, and then there was this Alioth2Salsa migration too… But at least I managed to get started working on LTS gain \o/

Debian Leftovers

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Debian
  • Weblate 3.0

    Weblate 3.0 has been released today. It contains brand new access control module and 61 fixed issues.

  • Second GSoC Report

    A lot has happened since the last report. The main change in nacho was probably the move to integrate django-ldapdb. This abstracts a lot of operations one would have to do on the directory using bare ldap and it also provides the possibility of having the LDAP objects in the Django admin interface, as those are addressed as Django models. By using django-ldapdb i was able to remove around 90% of the self written ldap logic. The only functionality that still remains where i have to directly use the ldap library are the password operations. It would be possible to implement these features with django-ldapdb, but then i would have to integrate password hashing functionality into nacho and above all i would have to adjust the hashing function for every ldap server with a different hashing algorithm setting. This way the ldap server does the hashing and i won’t have to set the algorighm in two places.

  • Paul Wise: FLOSS Activities May 2018
  • Chris Lamb: Free software activities in May 2018

A Penguin tries out Secure-K OS, part I

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Reviews
Debian

As the name suggests (Secure Key), Secure-K OS is a live operating system, based on Debian 9 Stretch, meant to be run from any USB key and “developed with security in mind”, according to its developers, Mon-K Data Protection.

A couple of “hardware versions” of the operating system are being sold on the project website, which means that one can buy Secure-K OS already deployed into a hardware-encrypted USB key with a pin-pad. It feels geeky.

Because I cannot download that piece of hardware via my network (I guess you cannot as well), what I have actually downloaded is the system image file of Secure-K OS Lite, then written into a USB stick of mine.

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Debian and Derivatives

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Debian
  • More Vnlog demos

    More demos of vnlog and feedgnuplot usage! This is pretty pointless, but should be a decent demo of the tools at least. This is a demo, not documentation; so for usage details consult the normal docs.

    Each Wednesday night I join a group bike ride. This is an organized affair, and each week an email precedes the ride, very roughly describing the route. The two organizers alternate leading the ride each week, and consequently the emails alternate also. I was getting the feeling that some of the announcements show up in my mailbxo more punctually than others, and after a recent 20-minutes-before-the ride email, I decided this just had to be quantified.

    The emails all go to a google-group email. The google-groups people are a wheel-reinventing bunch, so talking to the archive can't be done with normal tools (NNTP? mbox files? No?). A brief search revealed somebody's home-grown tool to programmatically grab the archive:

  • First GSoC Report

    To whom it may concern, this is my report over the first few weeks of gsoc under the umbrella of the Debian project. I’m writing this on my way back from the minidebconf in Hamburg, which was a nice experience, maybe there will be another post about that Wink

    So, the goal of my GSOC project is to design and implement a new SSO solution for Debian. But that only touches one part of the projects deliveries. As you can read in the description Alexander Wirth originally posted in the Debian Wiki, the project consists of two parts, where the first one is the design and coding of a new backend and self-service interface for Debian guest users (this includes the accounts of Debian Maintainers).

  • Parrot 4.0 Ethical Hacking Linux Distro Released: Download Here To Get New Features

    Compared to its previous releases, Debian-based Parrot 4.0 ethical hacking distro has arrived with a lot more changes. The development team has called it an important milestone in the history of the project.

  • Kubuntu 18.04 Review: KDE Plasma at its Best

    Kubuntu 18.04 LTS has been released and we take it for a test drive in this detailed review of Kubuntu 18.04.

Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie" Will Reach End of Security Support on June 17, 2018

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Debian

According to a security advisory posted by developer Moritz Muehlenhoff on the Debian-security-announce mailing list, the Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie" operating system series will no longer receive regular security updates as of June 17, 2018. However, a limited number of packages will still be updated for a while.

"This is an advance notice that regular security support for Debian GNU/Linux 8 (code name "jessie") will be terminated on the 17th of June," said Moritz Muehlenhoff. "As with previous releases additional LTS support will be provided for a reduced set of architectures and packages."

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Posts From MiniDebConf Hamburg 2018

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Debian
  • Debian is wrong

    So, the MiniDebConf Hamburg 2018 is about to end, it's sunny, no clouds are visible and people seem to be happy.

    And, I have time to write this blog post! So, just as a teaser for now, I'll present to you the content of some slides of our "Reproducible Buster" talk today. Later I will add links to the video and the full slides.

  • Mini DebConf Hamburg

    Since Friday around noon time, I and my 6-year-old son are at the Mini DebConf in Hamburg. Attending together with my son is quite a different experience than plain alone or with also having my wife around. Though he is doing pretty good, it mostly means the day ends for me around 2100 when he needs to go to sleep.

Debian Development/Developers

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Debian
  • Free software log (April 2018)

    This is rather late since I got distracted by various other things including, ironically, releasing a bunch of software. This is for April, so doesn't include the releases from this month.

    The main release I worked on was remctl 3.14, which fixed a security bug introduced in 3.12 with the sudo configuration option. This has since been replaced by 3.15, which has more thorough maintainer testing infrastructure to hopefully prevent this from happening again.

  • MiniDebCamp Hamburg - Friday 18/5, Saturday 19/5

    Friday and Saturday have been very productive days, I love events where there is time to hack!

    I had more chats about contributors.d.o with Ganneff and Formorer, and if all goes according to plan, soon salsa will start streaming commit information to contributors and populate information about different teams: not only about normal packaging repos, but also about websites, tools, native packages, etc.

  • Progress report from the Movim packaging sprint at MiniDebconf

    Nik wishes you to know that the Movim packaging sprint (sponsored by the DPL, thank you!) is handled under the umbrella of the Debian Edu sprint (similarily sponsored) since this package is handled by the Teckids Debian Task Force, personnel from Teckids e.V.

    After arriving, I’ve started collecting knowledge first. I reviewed upstream’s composer.json file and Wiki page about dependencies and, after it quickly became apparent that we need much more information (e.g. which versions are in sid, what the package names are, and, most importantly, recursive dependencies), a Wiki page of our own grew. Then I made a hunt for information about how to package stuff that uses PHP Composer upstream, and found the, ahem, wonderfully abundant, structured, plentiful and clear documentation from the Debian PHP/PEAR Packaging team. (Some time and reverse-engineering later I figured out that we just ignore composer and read its control file in pkg-php-tools converting dependency information to Debian package relationships. Much time later I also figured out it mangles package names in a specific way and had to rename one of the packages I created in the meantime… thankfully before having uploaded it.) Quickly, the Wiki page grew listing the package names we’re supposed to use. I created a package which I could use as template for all others later.

  • RcppGSL 0.3.5

    A maintenance update of RcppGSL just brought version 0.3.5 to CRAN, a mere twelve days after the RcppGSL 0.3.4. release. Just like yesterday's upload of inline 0.3.15 it was prompted by a CRAN request to update the per-package manual page; see the inline post for details.

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Android Leftovers

IIoT platform extends from the cloud to the depths of a mine

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Pinguy OS Puts On a Happier GNOME 3 Face

Pinguy OS 18.04 is an Ubuntu-based distribution that offers a non-standard GNOME desktop environment intended to be friendlier for new Linux users. This distro is a solid Linux OS with a focus on simple and straightforward usability for the non-geek desktop user. If you do not like tinkering with settings or having numerous power-grabbing fancy screen animations, Pinguy OS could be a good choice. The GNOME desktop is the only user interface option, but Pinguy OS' developer, Antoni Norman, tweaked the desktop environment with some different software options not usually packaged with GNOME. Read more