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Debian

Debian-Based Mobian Linux Now Supports the PineTab Linux Tablet

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Debian

The Debian-based Mobian Linux distribution for mobile devices is now available for PINE64’s PineTab Linux tablet in addition to the PinePhone Linux phone. A couple of months ago, I told you about the Mobian Project, a new GNU/Linux distribution that promised to bring the many benefits of the Debian GNU/Linux operating system to mobile devices.

To achieve that, Mobian Linux leverages the GNOME-based Phosh user interface developed by Purism for their Librem 5 phone, but for other devices, such as PINE64’s very popular PinePhone Linux phone. Until today, Mobian only supported the PinePhone, but the developers just announced on Twitter that they’ve started building their mobile oriented distribution for PINE64’s PineTab Linux tablet too.

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Mobian OS For PinePhone Now Available For Linux Tablet ‘PineTab’

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OS
Linux
Debian

A few months ago, we reported about Mobian Linux, an open-source project that aims to bring Debian GNU/Linux to mobile devices. Initially, Mobian was only available for Linux-based PinePhone. But as expected, Mobian OS has finally been ported to another PINE64 device, PineTab.

Yes, the Mobian team officially announced on Twitter that along with PinePhone it has started to support and build images for Linux-based tablet PineTab too.

The team also said that Mobian OS would support even more devices in the coming months. As of now, images of Mobian Linux are only available for PINE64’s smartphone and tablet device i.e., PinePhone and PineTab.

If you have a PineTab tablet, you can download the latest prebuilt Mobian image for PineTab and install it following the official guide.

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[Tails] Call for testing: 4.11~rc1

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GNU
Linux
Debian

Tails 4.11, scheduled for September 22, will be the first version of Tails to include Tor Browser 10.0 and to support persistent settings on the Welcome Screen!

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A morality cabal of Debian users tried to knife Torvalds

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Linux
Debian

A morality cabal of Debian users had a go at censoring IT’s Mr Sweary Linus Torvalds in 2014 according to a leak of documents from Debian-private.

The documents show a group of Linux developers who were so shocked that Torvalds swore at a conference they were attempting to use the Debian code-of-conduct to get him ostracised from the Linux mother church.

What appears to have got their knickers in a twist was that: “Linus described the Free Software Foundation as `bigots.’"

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Jonathan Carter: DebConf 20 Online

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Debian

My first one was DebConf7. Initially I mostly started watching the videos because I wanted to learn more about packaging. I had just figured out how to create binary packages by hand, and have read through the new maintainers guide, but a lot of it was still a mystery. By the end of DebConf7 my grasp of source packages was still a bit thin, but other than that, I ended up learning a lot more about Debian during DebConf7 than I had hoped for, and over the years, the quality of online participation for each DebConf has varied a lot.

I think having a completely online DebConf, where everyone was remote, helped raise awareness about how important it is to make the remote experience work well, and I hope that it will make people who run sessions at physical events in the future consider those who are following remotely a bit more.

During some BoF sessions, it was clear that some teams haven’t talked to each other face to face in a while, and I heard at least 3 teams who said “This was nice, we should do more regular video calls!”. Our usual communication methods of e-mail lists and IRC serve us quite well, for the most part, but sometimes having an actual conversation with the whole team present at the same time can do wonders for dealing with many kind of issues that is just always hard to deal with in text based mediums.

There were three main languages used in this DebConf. We’ve had more than one language at a DebConf before, but as far as I know it’s the first time that we had multiple talks over 3 languages (English, Malayalam and Spanish).

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Also: Thorsten Alteholz: My Debian Activities in August 2020

Debian: DebConf 2020 and Latest Development Reports

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Debian
  • Elana Hashman: Three talks at DebConf 2020

    This year has been a really unusual one for in-person events like conferences. I had already planned to take this year off from travel for the most part, attending just a handful of domestic conferences. But the pandemic has thrown those plans into chaos; I do not plan to attend large-scale in-person events until July 2021 at the earliest, per my employer's guidance.

    I've been really sad to have turned down multiple speaking invitations this year. To try to set expectations, I added a note to my Talks page that indicates I will not be writing any new talks for 2020, but am happy to join panels or reprise old talks.

  • Utkarsh Gupta: FOSS Activites in August 2020

    Here’s my (eleventh) monthly update about the activities I’ve done in the F/L/OSS world.

  • Mike Gabriel: My Work on Debian LTS (August 2020)

    In August 2020, I have worked on the Debian LTS project for 16 hours (of 8 hours planned, plus another 8 hours that I carried over from July).

The Problems Debian Is Facing In 2020

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Debian

The virtual DebConf20 concluded last week as the annual main conference for the Debian GNU/Linux distribution. Recently elected Debian Project Leader Jonathan Carter gave his talk at the event as an overview of where the project is at today as well as some of the problems they are facing today.

Debian's finances are sitting at around a healthy $896,065 USD. COVID-19 has helped their finances a bit in regards to less travel/conference expenses. Carter also noted as part of their fund, Debian is in the process of acquiring two new Lenovo servers they were able to obtain discounted to help in their efforts.

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Sparky 2020.09

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Debian

The September snapshot of Sparky 2020.09 of the (semi-)rolling line is out. It is based on the Debian testing “Bullseye”.

This release provides package updates and fixed an issue of the Sparky Advanced Installer, which generated broken fstab. There is no problem if you have installed Sparky 2020.08 using Calamares (called Sparky Installer).

Changes:
• packages updated from Debian testing repos as of August 31, 2020
• Linux kernel 5.7.17 (5.8.5 & 5.9-rc3 in Sparky unstable repos)
• Firefox 80
• LibreOffice 7.0.1-rc1
• fixed the Advanced Installer issue; thanks to lami07

System re-installation is not required, simply keep Sparky up to date.

The Special Edition iso images have been already updated too.

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Debian: BBB vs Jitsi, Extended Long Term Support (ELTS) and More

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Debian
  • Russell Coker: BBB vs Jitsi

    I previously wrote about how I installed the Jitsi video-conferencing system on Debian [1]. We used that for a few unofficial meetings of LUV to test it out. Then we installed Big Blue Button (BBB) [2]. The main benefit of Jitsi over BBB is that it supports live streaming to YouTube. The benefits of BBB are a better text chat system and a “whiteboard” that allows conference participants to draw shared diagrams. So if you have the ability to run both systems then it’s best to use Jitsi when you have so many viewers that a YouTube live stream is needed and to use BBB in all other situations.

    One problem is with the ability to run both systems. Jitsi isn’t too hard to install if you are installing it on a VM that is not used for anything else. BBB is a major pain no matter what you do. The latest version of BBB is 2.2 which was released in March 2020 and requires Ubuntu 16.04 (which was released in 2016 and has “standard support” until April next year) and doesn’t support Ubuntu 18.04 (released in 2018 and has “standard support” until 2023). The install script doesn’t check for correct apt repositories and breaks badly with no explanation if you don’t have Ubuntu Multiverse enabled.

  • Sylvain Beucler: Debian LTS and ELTS - August 2020

    Here is my transparent report for my work on the Debian Long Term Support (LTS) and Debian Extended Long Term Support (ELTS), which extend the security support for past Debian releases, as a paid contributor.

    In August, the monthly sponsored hours were split evenly among contributors depending on their max availability - I was assigned 21.75h for LTS (out of my 30 max; all done) and 14.25h for ELTS (out of my 20 max; all done).

    We had a Birds of a Feather videoconf session at DebConf20, sadly with varying quality for participants (from very good to unusable), where we shared the first results of the LTS survey.

  • Paul Wise: FLOSS Activities August 2020

    This month I didn't have any particular focus. I just worked on issues in my info bubble.

  • Daniel Lange & Debian, aggression and hypocrisy in focus

    This blog follows up on the earlier report about Daniel Lange, who was accused of aggression but accepted into Debian anyway at almost the same time Jacob Appelbaum was expelled.

    We quote the following two emails from the debian-private (leaked) gossip network, little comment is needed to see the hypocrisy at work inside Debian.

Securedrop Worktstation and how can you help

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Server
Security
Debian

The second half of the event was a live demo of the new SecureDrop Workstation project.

SecureDrop is an open source whistleblower submission system that media organizations and NGOs can install to securely accept documents from anonymous sources. It was originally created by the late Aaron Swartz and is now managed by Freedom of the Press Foundation. SecureDrop is available in 20 languages.

The current SecureDrop is dependent heavily on air-gapped Tails systems. This means increased security but also means a lot of time in accessing the submissions by the journalists. SecureDrop Workstation is the next generation system coming up to help in reducing this and also provide much smoother user experience without giving up the security.

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