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Debian and Ubuntu Leftovers

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Debian: easy-peasy-devicetree-squeezy and more

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  • easy-peasy-devicetree-squeezy

    I've created a new program, with a silly name, that solves a silly problem with devicetree overlays. Seem that, alhough there's patches to fully support overlays, including loading them on the fly into a running system, it's not in the mainline kernel, and nobody seems to know if/when it will get mainlined.

    So easy-peasy-devicetree-squeezy is a hack to make it easy to do device tree overlay type things already. This program makes it easy peasy to squeeze together the devicetree for your board with whatever additions you need. It's pre-deprecated on release; as soon as device tree overlay support lands, there will be no further need for it, probably.


    It supports integrating into a Debian system so that the devicetree will be updated, with your additions, whenever the kernel is upgraded.

  • My Debian Activities in January 2018

    This was my forty third month that I did some work for the Debian LTS initiative, started by Raphael Hertzog at Freexian.

  • Debian packaging with Git notes

    I finally found the time today to update my notes on how I package for Debian using Git. They're rather long (even after dropping my beginner Git tutorial, which seemed pointless given how many good ones there are now), so I'm not including the full text here. Take a look if you're curious.

Debian: Packaging, Debconf, Outreachy, LTS

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  • How are you handling building local Debian/Ubuntu packages?

    I’m in the middle of some conversations about Debian/Ubuntu repositories, and I’m curious how others are handling this.

    How are people maintaining repos for an organization? Are you integrating them with a git/CI (github/gitlab, jenkins/travis, etc) workflow? How do packages propagate into repos? How do you separate prod from testing? Is anyone running buildd locally, or integrating with more common CI tools?

  • Day four of the pre-FOSDEM Debconf Videoteam sprint
  • Debian welcomes its Outreachy interns

    The Outreachy programme is possible in Debian thanks to the efforts of Debian developers and contributors who dedicate their free time to mentor students and outreach tasks, and the Software Freedom Conservancy's administrative support, as well as the continued support of Debian's donors, who provide funding for the internships.

    Debian will also participate this summer in the next round for Outreachy, and is currently applying as mentoring organisation for the Google Summer of Code 2018 programme. Have a look at the projects wiki page and contact the Debian Outreach Team mailing list to join as a mentor or welcome applicants into the Outreachy or GSoC programme.

  • My Free Software Activities in January 2018
  • improving powertop autotuning

    I'm wondering about improving powertop's auto-tuning. Currently the situation is that, if you want to tune your laptop's power consumption, you can run powertop and turn on all the tunables and try it for a while to see if anything breaks. The breakage might be something subtle.

Elive 2.9.26 beta released

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This new version includes:

Greatly improved designs for clock and battery, clock is shown by default, the battery includes intuitive colors useful for show the status
Improved initial configurations for hardware accelerated features with optimal autodetections and skipping in not supported ones like virtualmachines
Lock screen: greatly improved design and a small fix included for wrong passwords attempts
Massive rewrite of keyboard bindings greatly improved for a stable and productive system, all the media keys from special keyboards are assigned to the best launchers and features
Desktop application launchers improvements, fixes and new includes, a new application is included to restart to a new clean desktop configuration, improved ebook support
Persistence: improved speed disabling some disk usage
Public folder sharing fixed

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Debian and Ubuntu (Microsoft) Leftovers

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Emmabuntüs Linux Debian Edition Is Now Based on Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch"

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Patrick Emmabuntüs, creator and maintainer of the Debian-based Emmabuntüs Linux operating system informs Softpedia today about the release and immediate availability of the first Emmabuntüs Debian Edition release based on Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch."

Emmabuntus Debian Edition 2 1.01 is the first release of the GNU/Linux distribution designed from the offset to be used on the computers of various educational communities around the globe that don't have the resources to use proprietary software to be based on on the Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system series. Most specifically, this release is based on the latest Debian GNU/Linux 9.3 release.

"This release is intended to alleviate even more the refurbishing workload on all the associations using Emmabuntüs, notably our friends of the Eisenia with their reuse in solidarity project Linux & Populus, our friends from Ayiyikoh, from BabyLab, and from the JMSI in Ivory Coast, with Jerryvalentin, their future big reuse event, as well as this nice initiative from our WenakLabs friends who are using Emmabuntüs in a Chad camp to introduce refugee children to the computer world," Patrick Emmabuntüs said in the announcement.

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Also: 2018 and CD burning still painful

SolydXK – A New Distro for Your Collection

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For a Linux user, every new distro is a whole new experience. For normal to advanced users, SolydXK is a great opportunity to use the most out of the computer. SolydXK is a distro based on Debian, the core of Ubuntu. It’s highly like that you’re using Ubuntu or other Ubuntu flavors. As SolydXK is based on Debian, you’ll feel nothing different with the functionalities and features different than Ubuntu. SolydXK also provides optimized Raspberry Pi version.

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Also: Debian Policy call for participation

Q4OS 3 "Centaurus" Linux OS Development Kicks Off Based on Debian 10 "Buster"

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Dubbed Centaurus, the Q4OS 3.1 series of the open-source distro is based on the upcoming Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" operating system, which currently lives in the Debian Testing repositories, and uses the development branch of the Trinity Desktop Environment (TDE), version 14.0.5.

"Q4OS Centaurus will be in development until Debian Buster becomes stable, and will be supported at least five years from the official release date," reads today's announcement. "Anybody is invited to try out the brand new version and report bugs and glitches."

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Review: siduction 2018.1.0

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Running siduction was a pretty good experience for me. The distribution is very easy to set up and the Calamares installer gets the user up and running with fewer steps than Debian's system installer. The LXQt edition of siduction works quickly and the desktop environment is pleasantly lightweight. I found LXQt generally provided me with all the features I wanted to use while staying out of my way, which was appreciated.

One of the few concerns I had was with the confusing way video playing worked on the distribution. I think it would have been easier if siduction simply shipped with VLC or Totem for playing videos. Otherwise, the applications which shipped with the distribution worked well and I found running siduction was generally pleasantly boring.

For people who like running cutting edge software and want to take advantage of Debian's massive supply of open source software, I think siduction is an excellent option. The user needs to be prepared to handle a lot of updates, dozens or (in my case) maybe even hundreds per week. But if you don't mind installing waves of updates, then siduction offers good performance, an easy to use installer and a wide range of desktop editions. I especially appreciate the Synaptic feature which allows us to restart services which have been updated and I suspect people running network services will really like having this ability.

siduction didn't really do anything which stood out as different or amazing, but on the other hand I didn't run into any serious problems. The distribution provided a solid, easy to use rolling release with a huge amount of software in the repositories and handled all my hardware beautifully. I think people who like running openSUSE Tumbleweed or Arch Linux may want to check out siduction as an alternative, especially since the distribution can be set up with little more than a few mouse clicks.

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SolydXK Plasma Rewards Effort With Stunning Results

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SolydXK is a Debian-based Linux distribution that comes with a choice of the Xfce (SolydX) or KDE (SolydK) desktop. The latest edition of SolydXK, released this month, provides a state-of-the-art Linux platform.

When I first reviewed the SoldXK distro back in 2013, it was an impressive new kid on the Linux block. Schoelje, a key developer of two discontinued desktop options within the Linux Mint distro, has helped the SolydXK distro grow into a reputable Linux offering built around two popular computing options.

Those two desktop options drew me to the Linux OS years ago. Both have their strong points.

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More in Tux Machines

Games: Valve, Modernisation in Google Summer of Code, Trigger Happy Havoc

  • Valve's Latest Steam Client Adds 2X-Scaling Mode on Linux, HiDPI on Windows 10
    Valve released today a new Steam Client stable update for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Windows, bringing long-anticipated features and improvements, along with numerous bug fixes.
  • Modernization of games
    This year I have proposed a Google Summer of Code idea (we are in student applications period) for modernizing Five-or-More, a game left out from the last games modernization round, when most of the games have been ported to Vala.
  • Trigger Happy Havoc Might Just Be The Weirdest Game on Linux
    With a special developer GDC viewing party tomorrow, I wanted to get us up to speed on the insanity that is Trigger Happy Havoc right now. I’m gonna level with you. My first impression of Spike Chunsoft’s offering, based on the trailer, was a tall glass of double checking reality garnished with a sprig of WTF.

Red Hat and Fedora

Android Leftovers

Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ Benchmarks

Last week on Pi Day marked the release of the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ with a slightly higher clocked Cortex-A53 processors, dual-band 802.11ac WiFi, faster Ethernet, and other minor enhancements over its predecessor. I've been spending the past few days putting the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ through its paces the past few days with an array of benchmarks while comparing the performance to other ARM SBCs as well as a few lower-end Intel x86 systems too. Here is all you need to know about the Raspberry Pi 3 B+ performance. Read more