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Debian

Easy Pyro 1.2.8 and Buster 2.1.8 released

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GNU
Linux
Debian

Enough new things have happened to warrant new releases. The so-called EOL (End Of Line) Pyro series is continuing to receive version bumps, and if you read the release notes you will see that the version bump 1.2.7 to 1.2.8 and 2.1.7 to 2.1.8 are both getting the same changes.

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Raspbian PIXEL Fork for PC and Mac Is Now Based on Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster"

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Debian

As you may know, Raspberry Pi Foundation forked the Xfce desktop environment to create PIXEL, an optimized desktop environment for their Debian-based Raspbian operating system for Raspberry Pi computers. A couple of years ago, Arne Exton forked PIXEL and created an installer to allow users to install it on PCs and Macs.

The latest release of Arne Exton's Raspberry Pi PIXEL is a major version that upgrades the system base from Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" to the latest Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" operating system series. It also ships with two Linux 4.19 kernels for PAE and non-PAE systems, Linux kernel 4.19.0-6-686-pae and Linux kernel 4.19.0-6-686.

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Debian Development Reports

Filed under
Development
Debian
  • Jonathan Carter: Free Software Activities (2019-10)

    AIMS Desktop talk: On the 1st of October I gave a talk at AIMS titled “Why AIMS Desktop?” where I talked about the Debian-based system we use at AIMS, and went into some detail about what Linux is, what Debian is, and why it’s used within the AIMS network. I really enjoyed the reaction from the students and a bunch of them are interested in getting involved directly with Debian. I intend to figure out a way to guide them into being productive community members without letting it interfere with their academic program.

    Catching up with Martin: On the 12th of October I had lunch with Martin Michelmayr. Earlier this year we were both running for DPL, which was an interesting experience and the last time we met neither of us had any intentions to do so. This was the first time we talked in person since then and it was good reflecting over the last year and we also talked about a bunch of non-Debian stuff.

  • Thorsten Alteholz: My Debian Activities in October 2019

    This month I accepted 257 packages and rejected 17. The overall number of packages that got accepted was 314.

  • Ben Hutchings: Debian LTS work, October 2019

    I was assigned 22.75 hours of work by Freexian's Debian LTS initiative. I worked almost all those hours this month, but will carry over 0.5 hours to November.

    I prepared and, after review, released Linux 3.16.75, including various important fixes. I then rebased the Debian package onto that, and sent out a request for testing. I prepared and sent out Linux 3.16.76-rc1 for review.

SparkyLinux's November ISO Brings Latest Debian GNU/Linux 11 "Bullseye" Updates

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Linux
Debian

The SparkyLinux 2019 "Po Tolo" operating system series is a rolling release version of SparkyLinux, based on the Debian Testing software repositories, where the upcoming Debian GNU/Linux 11 "Bullseye" operating system is currently being developed.

SparkyLinux 2019.11 is now the most up-to-date snapshot, adding all the latest software updates and security patches from the Debian GNU/Linux 11 "Bullseye" repositories as of November 2nd, 2019. Additionally, it upgrades the Linux kernel to version 5.2.17 and the Calamares installer to version 3.2.16.

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Sparky 2019.11

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GNU
Linux
Debian

There are new live/install media of Sparky 2019.11 “Po Tolo” available to download, which is based on the testing branch of Debian “Bullseye”.

Goals:
• system upgraded from Debian testing “Bullseye” repos as of November 2, 2019
• Calamares installer 3.2.16 + kpmcore 4
• Linux kernel 5.2.17 as default (5.3.8 & 5.4-rc5 in Sparky unstable repos)
• obmenu-generator removed from Openbox edition (due to Perl updated up to 5.30 and libgtk2-perl removed); it has been replaced by sparky-obmenu (+obmenu)
• added Sid repos back (not active) – use it on your own risk
• Yad updated up to 5.0, but it is available from Sparky unstable repos now

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Ten years of Nokia N900

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Debian
Gadgets

Nokia had been falling behind with Symbian development and was being taken over by the iPhone and the new Android phones.

The N900 would be the first and basically the last smartphone using the Maemo operating system. It wasn’t the fastest smartphone at the time, it didn’t have the most memory, it wasn’t the smallest or the lightest. But it was the only one that ran a full desktop OS.

The operating system is based on Debian, it doesn’t require rooting or unlocking. It just ships with a terminal application pre-installed and having a root shell is just one command away.

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Also: Edgewater Wireless Accepted to the Upstream OpenWrt Repository, A Linux Operating System Targeting Embedded Devices

Chrome OS 80 planned for Debian 10 Buster Linux support

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OS
Linux
Debian

Back in July when Debian Linux was officially updated from version 9, called Stretch, to Buster, version 10, I noted that Chromebooks weren’t ready for this upgrade in their Crostini container. Sure you can manually update the Linux distro on your Chromebook, but you run the risk of certain Chrome OS-specific integrations breaking.

Since then, the Chromium team has made great progress in preparing Chrome OS for an upgrade to Buster. And the current plan is to support that upgrade in Chrome OS 80, currently scheduled for release in February.

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Halloween Update for FreeCAD & Debian Science Work

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Debian
Sci/Tech

In August, a major milestone towards unified, mainline mechanical assembly functionality in FreeCAD was reached.

One of the core challenges in implementing assembly functionality is the problem of topological naming. In a CAD model there are topological entities, such as solids, faces, edges, and vertices. We must choose some algorithm to name them so that you can refer to relationships to make an assembly. A simple example would be two cubes, connected by touching faces. If a parameter in your model changes, and after recalculation, your "Face_N" is on the wrong side of the cube, your assembly may break, or not be what you are expecting. Without a good approach to topological naming, parametric FreeCAD models won't be robust to changes and recalculations, which defeats the purpose of parametric modeling.

Because this is such a difficult problem, progress has been slow. However, recently a relatively new FreeCAD developer, 'realthunder', put significant work towards this problem, with a solution finally on the horizon. Because it required major changes to FreeCAD's internals, the review and testing period was and continues to be lengthy.

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Debian: Development Reports and Sparky News

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Debian
  • Paul Wise: FLOSS Activities October 2019
  • Chris Lamb: Free software activities in October 2019

    Whilst anyone can inspect the source code of free software for malicious flaws almost all software is distributed pre-compiled to end users.

    The motivation behind the Reproducible Builds effort is to ensure no flaws have been introduced during this compilation process by promising identical results are always generated from a given source, thus allowing multiple third-parties to come to a consensus on whether a build was compromised.

  • Sparky news 2019/10

    The 10th monthly report of 2019 of the Sparky project:

    • Sparky 5.9 based on Debian stable “Buster” released
    • Linux kernel updated up to version 5.3.8 & 5.4-rc5
    • Perl updated to 5.30 in Debian testing repos, so libgtk2-perl has been removed and -> obmenu-generator as well, from the Openbox edition (rolling/testing line only)
    • sparky-obmenu installs and automatically configures obmenu for Openbox users, instead of obmenu-generator
    • and the Rescue edition’s menu has been reconfigured as well
    • Sparky rolling 2019.11 is on the way, stay tuned

  • Sylvain Beucler: Debian LTS and ELTS - October 2019

    Here is my transparent report for my work on the Debian Long Term Support (LTS) and Debian Extended Long Term Support (ELTS), which extend the security support for past Debian releases, as a paid contributor.

    In October, the monthly sponsored hours were split evenly among contributors depending on their max availability - I was assigned 22.75h for LTS (out of 30 max) and 20h for ELTS (max).

    There was a bit of backlog during my LTS triage week and for once I didn't make a pass at classifying old undetermined issues.

    MITRE was responsive for public (non-embargoed) issues in common free software packages, when I submitted new references or requested a CVE to identify known issues. There was more ball passing and delays when there was an another CNA (CVE Numbering Authorities).

  • Jonathan Wiltshire: Daisy and George’s Corfian Holiday

    Daisy and George have worked hard all year being diplomats in Arabia, helping test Debian CDs and writing best-selling books.

Debian Developers' Leftovers

Filed under
Debian
  • Long-Range Radios: A Perfect Match for Unix Protocols From The 70s

    It seems I’ve been on a bit of a vintage computing kick lately. After connecting an original DEC vt420 to Linux and resurrecting some old operating systems, I dove into UUCP.

    In fact, it so happened that earlier in the week, my used copy of Managing UUCP & Usenet by none other than Tim O’Reilly arrived. I was reading about the challenges of networking in the 70s: half-duplex lines, slow transmission rates, and modems that had separate dialers. And then I stumbled upon long-distance radio. It turns out that a lot of modern long-distance radio has much in common with the challenges of communication in the 1970s – 1990s, and some of our old protocols might be particularly well-suited for it. Let me explain — I’ll start with the old software, and then talk about the really cool stuff going on in hardware (some radios that can send a signal for 10-20km or more with very little power!), and finally discuss how to bring it all together.

  • Ritesh Raj Sarraf: Comments on Hugo with Isso

    Oh! Boy. Finally been able to get something set up almost to my liking. After moving away from Drupal to Hugo, getting the commenting system in place was challenging. There were many solutions but I was adamant to what I wanted.

  • BITS from the DPL For September/October 2019

    I'm absolutely convinced we've reached a point where in order to respect the people trying to get work done, we need to figure out where we are as a project. We can either decide that this is work we want to facilitate, or work that we as a project decide is not important. If we choose to facilitate the work, then I can help. I can work with teams to help them get the resources they need to respond to concerns. The policy editors will likely be able to break some of their deadlocks. We'll never force people to engage in work they don't want to do. But those of us in leadership positions will benefit from understanding where the project wants to go.

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More in Tux Machines

Nvidia Linux/BSD Graphics Driver Adds Support for Quadro T2000 with Max-Q Design

Coming just three weeks after the Nvidia 440.36 driver, which introduced support for the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1650 SUPER graphics card, the Nvidia 440.44 graphics driver is here to add support for the Nvidia Quadro T2000 with Max-Q Design graphics card on Linux, BSD, and Solaris systems, as well as support for the __GL_SYNC_DISPLAY_DEVICE environment variable for Vulkan apps on GNU/Linux systems. The Nvidia 440.44 proprietary graphics driver also improves installation support on Oracle Linux 7.7 systems where the Nvidia kernel module could fail to build with the "unknown type name 'vm_fault_t'" error, and addresses a bug discovered in an error handling path, which could cause a Linux kernel crash while loading the nvidia.ko module. Read more

Proteus Device is a secure, Linux-based handheld (not a smartphone)

The Proteus Device from XXLSEC is a handheld computer with a 5 inch touchscreen display and a secure, Linux-based operating system called PriveOS. At first glance, it looks a lot like a smartphone. But the Proteus Device does not have a cellular modem and it’s not designed to make phone calls. What it does have that you won’t find on most phones, is an Ethernet port. Read more

Why secure web-based applications with Kali Linux?

The security of web-based applications is of critical importance. The strength of an application is about more than the collection of features it provides. It includes essential (yet often overlooked) elements such as security. Kali Linux is a trusted critical component of a security professional’s toolkit for securing web applications. The official documentation says it is “is specifically geared to meet the requirements of professional penetration testing and security auditing.“ Incidences of security breaches in web-based applications can be largely contained through the deployment of Kali Linux’s suite of up-to-date software. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Which Ubuntu Release (2010-2019) is Your Favourite? Vote Now!

    With the end of the year, and indeed the decade, fast approaching I’ve been spending my time looking backwards, getting all misty-eyed and nostalgic about Ubuntu and how far its come since 2010.

  • OpenBSD Local Privilege Escalation Vulnerability (CVE-2019-19726)

    This vulnerability exists in OpenBSD’s dynamic loader versions of OpenBSD 6.5 and OpenBSD 6.6. It is exploitable in the default installation (via the set-user-ID executable chpass or passwd) and could allow local users or malicious software to gain full root privileges. For more technical details on this vulnerability, please see our security advisory. Also refer to our recently published OpenBSD blog post.

  • Microsoft begins Windows 10's 1809-to-1909 compulsory upgrade

    Microsoft has begun forcibly upgrading Windows 10 PCs running version 1809 with the latest, the November 2019 Update, aka 1909, which the company launched less than a month ago.

  • Xs:code launches subscription platform to monetize open-source projects [Ed: This is basically about making proprietary software add-ons, betraying Free software premises]

    Open source is a great source of free tools for developers, but as these projects proliferate, and some gain in popularity, the creators sometimes look for ways to monetize successful ones. The problem is that it’s hard to run a subscription-based, dual-license approach, and most developers don’t even know where to start. Enter Israeli startup xs:code, which has created a platform to help developers solve this problem. “Xs:code is a monetization platform for open-source projects. Unlike donation platforms which are pretty popular today, xs:code allows open-source developers to provide added value in exchange for payments. That comes on top of what they offer for free. This added value can be a different license, more features, support services or anything they can think of,” Netanel Mohoni, co-founder and CEO of xs:code told TechCrunch. This does not mean the open-source part of this goes away, only that the company is providing a platform for those developers who want to monetize their work, Mohoni said. “Companies pay for accessing the code, and they enjoy better software created by motivated developers who are now compensated for their work. Because our solution makes sure that the code remains open source, developers can continue accepting contributions so the community enjoys better code than ever before,” he explained.

  • The Linux Foundation's Automated Compliance Work Garners New Funding, Advances Tools Development [Ed: Of course the Linux Foundation is still promoting Microsoft GitHub (proprietary) and outsourcing everything to it]
  • The Linux Foundation’s Automated Compliance Work Garners New Funding, Advances Tools Development [Ed: The Corporate Linux Foundation is again whitewashing and openwashing a major GPL violator, VMware]

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced founding member commitments from Google, Siemens and VMware for the Automated Compliance Tooling (ACT), as well as key advancements for tools that increase ease and adoption of open source software. Using open source code comes with a responsibility to comply with the terms of that code’s license. The goal of ACT is to consolidate investments in these efforts and to increase interoperability and usability of open source compliance tooling. Google, Siemens and VMware are among the companies helping to underwrite and lead this collaborative work.

  • If you ARIA label something, give it a role

    As a rule of thumb, if you label something via aria-label or aria-labelledby, make sure it has a proper widget or landmark role. The longer version is that several elements created extraneous amount of announcements in screen readers in the past that were not really useful. Especially in the ARIA 1.0 days where a lot of things weren’t as clear and people were still gathering experience, this was an issue for elements or roles that mapped to regions, multiple landmarks of the same type on a page, etc. Therefore, best practice has become to label both widgets (which should be labeled anyway), and landmarks with means such as aria-label or aria-labelledby, to make them more useful.

  • Twitter Makes A Bet On Protocols Over Platforms

    It looks like Twitter is making a bet on protocols over platforms for its future.