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Debian

DebEX KDE Plasma Is a Pure Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" Distro with Linux 4.13

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Debian

GNU/Linux developer Arne Exton recently released a new build of his Debian-based DebEX KDE Plasma distribution, which is the first release based on the upcoming Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" OS.

DebEX KDE Plasma Build 171023 is here to replace last year's Build 161001, bringing components from both the Debian Sid and Debian Testing repositories, which means that it doesn't contain any packages from Ubuntu, nor Kubuntu operating systems, thus making it a bleeding-edge GNU/Linux distribution.

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Should You Use Linux Mint's Debian or Standard Edition?

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GNU
Linux
Debian
Ubuntu

At first, users might wonder why Linux Mint offers both its Ubuntu-based Linux Mint Standard Edition and the Linux Mint Debian Edition (LMDE). Since Debian, Linux Mint, and Ubuntu all derive from the Debian repositories, isn't the family resemblance too close to bother?

To the casual user, the choice may appear to be no more than the result of Linux Mint trying to accommodate as many users as possible. However, depending on your needs and preferences, you may find that one edition suits your needs more than the other.

In general, the two editions have much in common. Both the Debian and the standard editions are available in 32- and 64-bit downloads that default to the Cinnamon or Mate desktops. Both use the same installer, and both open for the first time on desktops with similar wallpapers and tools. Both, too, can add other desktop environments from the Mint repositories that they both share. According to Linux Mint, LMDE is faster than the standard edition, but in practice the difference is slight enough that many users probably never notice.

However, look closer, and the differences start to appear -- although these difference have changed over the years. For example, it is no longer true that the LMDE is a rolling release -- one that adds new packages as they become available, rather than waiting for a general release -- although LMDE 1 was.

Also, contrary to a widely circulating story, LMDE 2 is fully capable of using Ubuntu PPA repositories for packages in development. The PPAs simply have to be added as a package source in /etc/apt/. Alternatively, their packages can be downloaded and installed using the dpkg command. Since Debian and Ubuntu have been different distros for well over a decade now, you may find that some packages from PPAs are not compatible with Debian, but these cases are relatively rare, particularly if you stick to productivity applications rather than core system components.

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Proxmox 5.1 Update Rebases the Virtual Environment to Debian 9.2, Linux 4.13

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Linux
Debian

Arriving more than three months after Proxmox VE 5.0 release, Proxmox VE 5.1 is a point release adding updated components based on the upstream repositories of the Debian GNU/Linux 9.2 "Stretch" operating system, along with the Linux 4.13 kernel series and the latest Ceph 12.2 "Luminous" and ZFS 0.7.2 releases.

"Proxmox VE 5.1 comes with production-ready Ceph cluster packages. The virtualization platform integrates Ceph v12.2 Luminous, the long-term stable release of the software-defined storage solution. Users can now implement Ceph clusters as distributed storage solution in production," reads today's announcement.

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Debian and Ubuntu Leftovers

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • APT 1.6 alpha 1 – seccomp and more

    I just uploaded APT 1.6 alpha 1, introducing a very scary thing: Seccomp sandboxing for methods, the programs downloading files from the internet and decompressing or compressing stuff. With seccomp I reduced the number of system calls these methods can use to 149 from 430. Specifically we excluded most ways of IPC, xattrs, and most importantly, the ability for methods to clone(2), fork(2), or execve(2) (or execveat(2)). Yes, that’s right – methods can no longer execute programs.

  • Debian Policy call for participation -- October 2017

    Here’s are some of the bugs against the Debian Policy Manual. In particular, there really are quite a few patches needing seconds from DDs.

  • Free Software Efforts (2017W42)

    Here’s my weekly report for week 42 of 2017. In this week I have replaced my spacebar, failed to replace a HDD and begun the process to replace my YubiKey.

  • Winners of the Ubuntu 17.10 Free Culture Showcase

    Every new Ubuntu cycle brings many changes, and the arrival of Ubuntu 17.10, the “Artful Aardvark” release, brings more changes than usual. The default desktop has changed to GNOME Shell, with some very thoughtful changes by the desktop team to make it more familiar. And of course, the community wallpapers included with this exciting new release have changed as well!

    Every cycle, talented artists around the world create media and release it under licenses that encourage sharing and adaptation. For Ubuntu 17.10, 50 images were submitted to the Ubuntu 17.10 Free Culture Showcase photo pool on Flickr, where all eligible submissions can be found.

Debian: pk4, Freexian and More

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Debian

Debian and Ubuntu Leftovers

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • MiniDebConf Prishtina 2017

    On 7th of October in Prishtina, Kosova’s capital, was hosted the first mini deb conference.
    The MiniDebConf Prishtina was an event open to everyone, regardless of their level of knowledge about Debian or other free and open source projects. At MiniDebConf Prishtina there were organized a range of topics incidental to Debian and free software, including any free software project, Outreachy internship, privacy, security, digital rights and diversity in IT.

  • No more no surprises

    Debian has generally always had, as a rule, “sane defaults” and “no surprises”. This was completely shattered for me when Vim decided to hijack the mouse from my terminal and break all copy/paste functionality. This has occured since the release of Debian 9.

  • Debian Security Advisory 3999-1

    Debian Linux Security Advisory 3999-1 - Mathy Vanhoef of the imec-DistriNet research group of KU Leuven discovered multiple vulnerabilities in the WPA protocol, used for authentication in wireless networks. Those vulnerabilities applies to both the access point (implemented in hostapd) and the station (implemented in wpa_supplicant).

  • LXD Weekly Status #19

    This past week, part of the team was back in New York for more planning meetings, getting the details of the next 6 months, including LXC, LXD and LXCFS 3.0 fleshed out.

Debian 9.2.1, New Kernel, Debian Installer Git Repository

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Debian
  • Debian 9.2.1 is out
  • A New Debian/Ubuntu Kernel Build With The Latest AMDGPU DC Patches

    For those wanting to run the very latest bleeding-edge AMDGPU DC display code on an Ubuntu/Debian-based box, here is a fresh x86_64 kernel build of the latest DC kernel patches as of today.

    It was on Friday that more AMDGPU DC patches were pushed out as AMD works to have this code all tidied up and prepped for the upcoming Linux 4.15 cycle.

  • Debian Installer git repository

    While dealing with d-i’s translation last month in FOSScamp, I was kinda surprised it’s still on SVN. While reviewing PO files from others, I couldn’t select specific parts to commit.

    Debian does have a git server, and many DDs (Debian Developers) use it for their Debian work, but it’s not as public as I wish it to be. Meaning I lack the pull / merge request abilities as well as the review process.

Debian, Ubuntu, elementary OS, pfSense and Windows

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OS
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
Debian
Ubuntu
  • My Free Software Activities in Jul-Sep 2017

    If you read Planet Debian often, you’ve probably noticed a trend of Free Software activity reports at the beginning of the month. First, those reports seemed a bit unamusing and lengthy, but since I take the time to read them I’ve learnt a lot of things, and now I’m amazed at the amount of work that people are doing for Free Software. Indeed, I knew already that many people are doing lots of work. But reading those reports gives you an actual view of how much it is.

  • OpenStack Development Summary – October 13, 2017

    Welcome to the seventh Ubuntu OpenStack development summary!

    This summary is intended to be a regular communication of activities and plans happening in and around Ubuntu OpenStack, covering but not limited to the distribution and deployment of OpenStack on Ubuntu.

    If there is something that you would like to see covered in future summaries, or you have general feedback on content please feel free to reach out to me (jamespage on Freenode IRC) or any of the OpenStack Engineering team at Canonical!

  • elementary OS 0.5 "Juno" GNU/Linux Distro Could Use Ubuntu's Snappy Technologies

    The guys over elementary OS, the popular GNU/Linux distribution based on Ubuntu, were interviewed recently by Canonical's Sarah Dickinson about upcoming integration of Snap packages into their infrastructure.

    As you are aware, there are three main universal binary packages available for GNU/Linux distributions, Snappy, Flatpak, and AppImage, and OS maintainers are free to implement which one they think it's best for their users, or even more of them.

    In the interview, elementary's devs revealed the fact that they want to go with Ubuntu's Snappy technologies to provide their users with a modern and secure confined app format because of the extra layer of security Snaps provide by design.

  • pfSense 2.4 BSD Operating System Debuts with New Installer, Drops 32-Bit Images

    Rubicon Communications' Jim Pingle announced the release of the pfSense 2.4.0 operating system, a major release that introduces support for new devices, new features, and numerous improvements.

    Based on the latest FreeBSD 11.1 operating system, the pfSense 2.4 release comes with an all-new installer based on bsdinstall and featuring support for the ZFS file system, UEFI machines, as well as multiple types of partition layouts, including the widely used GPT and BIOS.

  • Dutch privacy regulator says Windows 10 breaks the law

    The lack of clear information about what Microsoft does with the data that Windows 10 collects prevents consumers from giving their informed consent, says the Dutch Data Protection Authority (DPA). As such, the regulator says that the operating system is breaking the law.

    To comply with the law, the DPA says that Microsoft needs to get valid user consent: this means the company must be clearer about what data is collected and how that data is processed. The regulator also complains that the Windows 10 Creators Update doesn't always respect previously chosen settings about data collection. In the Creators Update, Microsoft introduced new, clearer wording about the data collection—though this language still wasn't explicit about what was collected and why—and it forced everyone to re-assert their privacy choices through a new settings page. In some situations, though, that page defaulted to the standard Windows options rather than defaulting to the settings previously chosen.

Debian: Generating 3D prints, pristine-tar, other developments

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Debian
  • Generating 3D prints in Debian using Cura and Slic3r(-prusa)

    At my nearby maker space, Sonen, I heard the story that it was easier to generate gcode files for theyr 3D printers (Ultimake 2+) on Windows and MacOS X than Linux, because the software involved had to be manually compiled and set up on Linux while premade packages worked out of the box on Windows and MacOS X. I found this annoying, as the software involved, Cura, is free software and should be trivial to get up and running on Linux if someone took the time to package it for the relevant distributions. I even found a request for adding into Debian from 2013, which had seem some activity over the years but never resulted in the software showing up in Debian. So a few days ago I offered my help to try to improve the situation.

  • pristine-tar updates

    pristine-tar is a tool that is present in the workflow of a lot of Debian people. I adopted it last year after it has been orphaned by its creator Joey Hess. A little after that Tomasz Buchert joined me and we are now a functional two-person team.

  • Debian LTS work, September 2017
  • My Free Software Activities in September 2017

    Welcome to gambaru.de. Here is my monthly report that covers what I have been doing for Debian. If you’re interested in Java, Games and LTS topics, this might be interesting for you.

Debian GNU/Linux News

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Debian
  • Debian GNU/Linux 9.2 "Stretch" Live & Installable ISOs Now Available to Download

    As expected, the recently released Debian GNU/Linux 9.2 "Stretch" maintenance update is now available to download from the official mirrors as installable and live ISOs for those who want to deploy the Linux OS on new PCs.

    Debian GNU/Linux 9.2 is the second point release of the Debian Stretch operating system series, coming two and a half months after the first maintenance update. As initially reported, it brings more than 150 security and bug fixes combined, offering users an up-to-date installation medium.

  • Debian 9.2 'Stretch' Linux-based operating system is here -- download the distro now

    Debian is one of the most important Linux-based operating systems. It is a great distribution in its own right, but it is also the foundation of many other distros. For instance, Ubuntu is largely based on Debian, and then many operating systems are based on Ubuntu. If you were to look at a Linux "family tree," many roads would lead back to the wonderful Debian.

    The most recent version of Debian is 9.x, code-named "Stretch". The second point release for the operating system, version 9.2, is now available. There are many bug fixes -- plus significant security patches -- so despite being a point release, it is still very important.

  • Debian GNU/Linux 9.2 “Stretch” Released With Tons Of Fixes
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More in Tux Machines

Programming/Development: Most In-Demand Programming Languages and More

  • Top 7 Most In-Demand Programming Languages Of 2018: Coding Dojo
    Most of the fields in the tech industry demand a regular learning from you as they are dynamic in nature. You need to be up-to-date with the latest trends and make sure that your skillset matches the needs of your target industry. For developers, this change becomes even more necessary. For example, today’s mobile app developers need to eventually make a shift from Java and Objective-C to Kotlin and Swift, respectively. This growing adoption and demand is reflected clearly in different lists of the popular programming languages. [...] Coding Dojo analyzed the data from job listing website Indeed.com. This job posting data revolved around twenty-five programming languages, frameworks, and stacks. It’s worthing noting that some most loved programming languages like Ruby and Swift didn’t make the cut as their demand was lower as compared to other biggies. The other growing languages that didn’t make the cut were R and Rust.
  • The proof is in the pudding
    I wrote these when I woke up one night and had trouble getting back to sleep, and spent a while in a very philosophical mood thinking about life, success, and productivity as a programmer.
  • littler 0.3.3
    The fourth release of littler as a CRAN package is now available, following in the now more than ten-year history as a package started by Jeff in 2006, and joined by me a few weeks later. littler is the first command-line interface for R and predates Rscript. In my very biased eyes better as it allows for piping as well shebang scripting via #!, uses command-line arguments more consistently and still starts faster. Last but not least it is also less silly than Rscript and always loads the methods package avoiding those bizarro bugs between code running in R itself and a scripting front-end.

Games: Project 5: Sightseer, 'Jupiter Hell', Dimension Drive, Keep Talking and Nobody Explodes, Counter-Strike

Liberated Linux Drivers Help AMD 'Transparency'

  • AMD Navi spotted in Linux drivers
    The architecture name is hidden under SUPER_SECRET codename. Normally we would be seeing the real name of the GPU, but AMD is likely trying to avoid generating hype for architecture which is still months away (I heard something about late 2018), hence the secret.
  • AMD’s next-gen GPU has been spotted in Linux drivers
    With AMD’s RX Vega now out and about, it is time to start looking towards the future. We’ve known for some time that Vega will be followed up by ‘Navi’ at some point between 2018 and 2020. Now, we know that progress is being made as AMD’s next-gen GPU has appeared in a new driver.
  • AMD's Next Gen Navi GPU Architecture Found Referenced In Linux Drivers
    This has been a big year for AMD, there is no doubt about that. Having launched a new CPU and GPU architectures (Zen and Vega, respectively), the company thrust itself back into relevancy in the high-end market, whereas previously the top shelf was the exclusive domain of rival Intel. So, what's next? On the GPU side, AMD is expected to roll out its Navi architecture sometime next year, with references to its next generation GPU already showing up in driver code.
  • AMD 7nm “Super Secret” Navi GPU Spotted In Driver, 2H 2018 Launch Expected
    AMD’s upcoming next generation 7nm based graphics architecture code named “Navi” has been spotted in Linux driver code. The all new GPU architecture is officially slated to debut next year, with all whispers indicating a debut in the latter half of the year.

ScummVM 2.0

  • ScummVM 2.0 Released To Relive Some Gaming Classics
    ScummVM 2.0 has been released as a major update to this open-source game engine recreation project. ScummVM has advanced well past just supporting the original LucasArts adventure games and with today's v2.0 rollout supports "23 brand new old games", including many older Sierra adventure titles. Among the games that can now be played atop ScummVM 2.0 are Police Quest 4, Lighthouse, Leisure Suit Larry 6/7, King's Quest VII, Full Pipe, and many other titles.
  • ScummVM 2.0.
    Just in time for the holidays, the final release of ScummVM 2.0 is here! This version adds support for 23 brand new old games, including almost all of the 32-bit Sierra adventures...
  • ScummVM 2.0 released adding support for more classic games
    For those who enjoy the classics, you might want to check out the latest release of ScummVM which adds support for more classic titles. When it comes to the games, they've added support for 23 more titles like King's Quest VII, King's Questions, Leisure Suit Larry 6 (hi-res), Leisure Suit Larry 7, Riven: The Sequel to Myst and more. It's a rather impressive list, but of course the 2.0 release doesn't stop at adding support for more titles.