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Debian

Knoppix 8.2 Linux Distribution Released

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Debian

Longtime Linux users likely have many fond memories of the Knoppix Live CD Linux distribution and today a new release is now available.

Knoppix 8.2 is now available to succeed last year's 8.1 release. Knoppix 8.2 features a wealth of package updates over 8.1, including the use of the Linux 4.16 kernel, KDE Plasma 5.12.4, Qt 5.10, and hundreds of other package updates for this Debian-based Live CD/DVD/USB distribution.

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Akademy-es in Valencia and Debian Women in Curitiba

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KDE
Debian
  • A weekend at Akademy-es in Valencia

    This past weekend I travelled to Valencia, the third biggest city in Spain, located by the Mediterranean sea, to attend to Akademy-es, the annual meeting of the KDE community in Spain. At this event we also hold the KDE Spain annual assembly.

    KDE España is the legal entity behind the KDE community in Spain and legally represents KDE in my country. We are about 30 members and it was founded in 2009 although Akademy-es started a few years earlier.

  • Renata D'Avila: Debian Women in Curitiba

    At MiniDebConf Curitiba last year, few women attended. And, as I mentioned on a previous post, there was not even a single women speaking at MiniDebConf last year.

    I didn't want MiniDebConf Curitiba 2018 to be a repeat of last year. Why? In part, because I have involved in other tech communities and I know it doesn't have to be like that (unless, of course, the community insists in being mysoginistic...).

    So I came up with the idea of having a meeting for women in Curitiba one month before MiniDebConf. The main goal was to create a good enviroment for women to talk about Debian, whether they had used GNU/Linux before or not, whether they were programmers or not.

    Miriam and Kira, two other women from the state of Parana interested in Debian, came along and helped out with planning. We used a collaborative pad to organize the tasks and activities and to create the text for the folder about Debian we had printed (based on Debian's documentation).

Devuan 2.0 As Debian Without Systemd Hits Release Candidate Stage

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Debian

Devuan remains the prominent Debian fork that is focused on "init freedom" by stripping out Debian's dependence on systemd.

Devuan 1.0 was released in 2017 as based on the Debian 8 "Jessie" package set while Devuan 2.0 "ASCII" has been in development as based on the Debian 9 "Stretch" packaging. Devuan 2.0 beta was released back in February while today the Devuan 2.0 Release Candidate has hit the mirrors.

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A random collection of [Debian] thoughts

Tails 3.7 is out

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Debian

This release fixes several security issues and users should upgrade as soon as possible.

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Introducing Autodeb

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Debian

Autodeb is a new service that will attempt to automatically update Debian packages to newer upstream versions or to backport them. Resulting packages will be distributed in apt repositories.

I am happy to annnounce that I will be developing this new service as part of Google Summer of Code 2018 with Lucas Nussbaum as a mentor.

The program is currently nearing the end of the “Community Bonding” period, where mentors and their mentees discuss on the details of the projects and try to set objectives.

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Debian Security and More

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Debian

Debian Leftovers

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Debian
  • My Debian Activities in April 2018

    This month I accepted 145 packages and rejected 5 uploads. The overall number of packages that got accepted this month was 260.

  • Debian/TeX Live 2018.20180505-1

    The first big bunch of updates of TeX Live 2018. During the freeze for DVD production, several bugs have been found and fixed. In particular compatibility of csqoutes with the shiny new LaTeX release, as well as some other related fixes. That hopefully will fix most if not all build failures that were introduced with the TL2018 upload.

New in Debian and OpenSUSE

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Debian
SUSE
  • Bits from Debian: New Debian Developers and Maintainers (April and May 2018)

    The following contributors got their Debian Developer accounts in the last two months:

        Andreas Boll (aboll)
        Dominik George (natureshadow)
        Julien Puydt (jpuydt)
        Sergio Durigan Junior (sergiodj)
        Robie Basak (rbasak)
        Elena Grandi (valhalla)
        Peter Pentchev (roam)
        Samuel Henrique (samueloph)

    The following contributors were added as Debian Maintainers in the last two months:

        Andy Li
        Alexandre Rossi
        David Mohammed
        Tim Lunn
        Rebecca Natalie Palmer
        Andrea Bolognani
        Toke Høiland-Jørgensen
        Gabriel F. T. Gomes
        Bjorn Anders Dolk
        Geoffroy Youri Berret
        Dmitry Eremin-Solenikov

    Congratulations!

  •  

  • Results in for openSUSE Board Elections

    This year’s openSUSE Board elections produced the longest election period in the history of the project.

    The four phases of the election, which included an application phase for new membership in phase one, lasted almost two months.

    The results of the elections ended in the success of 237 out of 400 people voting in this year’s election, which is a record both in participation percentage (59.25 percent) and in actual voters (237).

Major Debian Linux Kernel Patch Fixes 8-Year-Old Privilege Escalation Flaw

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Linux
Debian

First and foremost, the security update again patches Debian GNU/Linux's kernel against both variants of the Spectre vulnerability (CVE-2017-5715 and CVE-2017-5753). These could allow an attacker that has control over an unprivileged process to read memory from arbitrary addresses, including kernel memory.

While Spectre Variant 2 was mitigated for the x86 architecture (amd64 and i386) via the retpoline compiler feature, Spectre Variant 1 was mitigated by first identifying the vulnerable code sections and then replacing the array access with the speculation-safe array_index_nospec() function.

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Debian and Canonical/Ubuntu Leftovers

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • TeX Live 2018 released

    I guess everyone knows it already, Karl has released TeX Live 2018 officially just when I was off for some mountaineering, but perfectly in time for the current BachoTeX meeting.

  • Debian Policy call for participation -- May 2018

    We had a release of Debian Policy near the beginning of last month but there hasn’t been much activity since then.

  • Launchpad news, June 2017 – April 2018

    Once again it’s been a while since we posted a general update, so here’s a changelog-style summary of what we’ve been up to.  As usual, this changelog preserves a reasonable amount of technical detail, but I’ve omitted changes that were purely internal refactoring with no externally-visible effects.

  • Ubuntu 18.04 LTS: multi-cloud, and containers and AI, oh my!

    Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu, recently introduced the new Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, optimized for security, multi-cloud, containers and AI. Canonical’s Distribution of Kubernetes (CDK) runs on public clouds, VMware, OpenStack, and bare metal and delivers the latest upstream version, currently Kubernetes 1.10. After the initial three-step guided deployment, the distribution supports upgrades to future versions of Kubernetes, expansion of the Kubernetes cluster on demand, and integration with optional components for storage, networking and monitoring. A range of partners deliver their solutions on CDK, such as Rancher 2.0.

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More in Tux Machines

A brief history of text-based games and open source

The Interactive Fiction Technology Foundation (IFTF) is a non-profit organization dedicated to the preservation and improvement of technologies enabling the digital art form we call interactive fiction. When a Community Moderator for Opensource.com suggested an article about IFTF, the technologies and services it supports, and how it all intersects with open source, I found it a novel angle to the decades-long story I’ve so often told. The history of IF is longer than—but quite enmeshed with—the modern FOSS movement. I hope you’ll enjoy my sharing it here. Read more

Fact check: Linux developer accused of pedophilia in fake blog posts

Followers of some of Reddit’s Linux-devoted subreddits were recently greeted with an unusual and disturbing discovery: pro-pedophilia and anti-Semitic blog posts from the developer of Linux Exherbo, a Linux distribution with native cross-compiling package management. A website under the developer’s name featured a number of unsavory blog posts. Fortunately, the blog appears to be fake. The developer, Bryan Østergaard, normally posts updates to a LiveJournal page under the username kloeri, although the last update dates 2014. Earlier this week, someone shared to Reddit a different blog attributed to Østergaard with a handful of more recent blog posts explaining “why” he decided to create Exherbo. Read more

Open source code worth $600m contributed to Apache

Open source code valued at over $600 million was delivered by volunteer project contributors to the Apache Software Foundation (ASF) in a single 12-month period. That's according to the Apache Software Foundation's (ASF) annual report for its 2018 fiscal year, which ended on 30 April. The report was released last week. ASF was established in 1999 and claims to be the world's largest open source foundation with more than 300 freely available, enterprise-wide projects that serve as the backbone for some of the most visible and widely used applications in computing today. Read more

RIP, Printrbot

  • Printrbot has shut down
    Printrbot, a popular Kickstarter-backed 3D printer company, has shut down, leaving only a barebones website and little explanation.
  • Pioneering desktop 3D printer maker Printrbot closes it doors
  • Printrbot Closes Doors, Saddening 3D Printing Fans Everywhere
    In a competitive market, it’s hard for any company to stay ahead of the others, and it’s a sad fact that even some of the most popular and long-lived companies succumb to heavy weather. Printrbot, founded in 2011, had legions of fans who loved its printers’ affordability, ease of assembly and use, and open source freedom. Printrbot 3D printers were 3D printers for the people – only a few hundred dollars, they provided access to 3D printing technology for people who hadn’t been able to afford it before, and although they were simple, they were high quality. Best of all, you could make them your own, tinkering with them and creating new and unique machines, as so many users did. The company was ethical, direct and honest. Some open source 3D printer companies just download files and don’t share. Printrbot dutifully shared its source files and was a rare true open source company.
  • 3D Printing Community saddened by closure of Printrbot 3D printers
    Open source 3D printer manufacturer Printrbot has announced the close of its business, citing poor sales as the reason for the decision. A simple statement on the Printrbot website from founder Brook Drumm reads: “Printrbot is closed. Low sales led to hard decisions. We will be forever grateful to all the people we met and served over the years. Thank you all.” For the time being, Drumm will reportedly be “unreachable” for comments, and plans to share his views and plans for this “final chapter” in due course. The 3D Printing Community however has take to social media in mourning of the company, with figures including Joel Telling (YouTube’s 3D Printing Nerd), Thomas Sanladerer, and Dr. Adrian Bowyer himself weighing in on the close.
  • Printrbot Shuts Down After Seven Years of Creating Open Source 3D Printers
    Printrbot, the 3D printing manufacturer which was founded in 2011 with the launch of its original Printrbot printer on Kickstarter, has announced that it's now sadly closing its doors.