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Debian

Sparky 2020.02.1

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

Sparky 2020.02.1 “Po Tolo” of the (semi-)rolling line is out. It is based on the testing branch of Debian “Bullseye”.

This is a minor update, which temporary fixes a problem of installing Sparky via Calamares with kpmcore 4.

Changes between Sparky 2020.02 and 2020.02.1:
• system upgraded from Debian testing repos as of February 13, 2020
• kpmcore downgraded to version 3.3.0
• Calamares installer rebuild using libkpmcore7 3.3.0

No system reinstallation is required, simply keep Sparky up to date.

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Reports From Devconf and MiniDebCamp

Filed under
Red Hat
Debian
  • Kevin Fenzi: Devconf.cz 2020

    This year again I had the honor of being able to attend devconf.cz. Many thanks to Red Hat (My employer) for sending me to the conference (it also allowed me to attend some work meetings after the conference).

    The trip out to Brno was much as it has been for me in the past, except this time it was even longer since the Portland to Amsterdam flight I used to take is no longer offered, so I had to go from Portland to Seattle and then Amsterdam. Due to various scheduling issues I also went to Vienna this time instead of Prague. No particular problems on the trip, just a long haul. The train in Vienna was nice and clean and fast and comfortable.

  • DevConf CZ 2020: play by play

    This is my third time attending DevConf CZ. I attended on behalf of RIT LibreCorps for professional development, before a week of work-related travel. DevConf CZ is also a great opportunity to meet friends and colleagues from across time zones. This year, I arrived hoping to better understand the future of Red Hat’s technology, see how others are approaching complex problems in emerging technology and open source, and of course, to have yummy candy.

  • Bits from MiniDebCamp Brussels and FOSDEM 2020

    I traveled to Brussels from January 28th to February 6th to join MiniDebCamp and FOSDEM 2020. It was my second trip to Brussels because I was there in 2019 to join Video Team Sprint and FOSDEM

    MiniDebCamp took place at Hackerspace Brussels (HSBXL) for 3 days (January 29-31). My initial idea was travel on 27th and arrive in Brussels on 28th to rest and go to MiniDebCamp on the first day, but I had buy a ticket to leave Brazil on 28th because it was cheaper.

A Raspberry Pi Kiosk

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
Debian
HowTos

Unlike my usual Raspberry Pi hacks, the kiosk would need a monitor and a window system. So instead of my usual Raspbian Lite install, I opted for a full Raspbian desktop image.

Mistake. First, the Raspbian desktop is very slow. I intended to use a Pi Zero W for the kiosk, but even on a Pi 3 the desktop was sluggish.

More important, the desktop is difficult to configure. For instance, a kiosk needs to keep the screen on, so I needed to disable the automatic screen blanking. There are threads all over the web asking how to disable screen blanking, with lots of solutions that no longer apply because Raspbian keeps changing where desktop configuration files are stored.

Incredibly, the official Raspbian answer for how to disable screen blanking in the desktop — I can hardly type, I'm laughing so hard — is: install xscreensaver, which will then add a configuration option to turn off the screensaver. (I actually tried that just to see if it would work, but changed my mind when I saw the long list of dependencies xscreensaver was going to pull in.)

I never did find a way to disable screen blanking, and after a few hours of fighting with it, I decided it wasn't worth it. Setting up Raspbian Lite is so much easier and I already knew how to do it. If I didn't, Die Antwort has a nice guide, Setup a Raspberry Pi to run a Web Browser in Kiosk Mode, that uses my preferred window manager, Openbox. Here are my steps, starting with a freshly burned Raspbian Lite SD card.

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Debian Reports From Norbert Preining, Paulo Henrique de Lima Santana and Molly de Blanc

Filed under
GNOME
Debian
  • Norbert Preining: MuPDF, QPDFView and other Debian updates

    For those interested, I have updated mupdf (1.16.1), pymupdf (1.16.10), and qpdfview (current bzr sources) to the latest versions and added to my local Debian apt repository...

  • Paulo Henrique de Lima Santana: My free software activities in january 2020

    Hello, this is my first monthly report about activities in Debian and Free Software in general.

    Since the end of DebConf19 in July 2020 I was avoiding to work in Debian stuff because the event was too stresseful to me. For months I felt discouraged to contribute to the project, until December.

  • Molly de Blanc: How do you say “desktop environment” in Flemish? FOSDEM 2020 Trip Report

    FOSDEM is one of the biggest community organized conferences in Europe. Run by a team of dedicated volunteers, the conference has been going for 20 years. It’s one of the biggest yearly events for us at GNOME Foundation and a rare opportunity for the staff to come together.

    As a fully remote team, the GNOME Foundation staff all get together twice a year to strategize, plan, and collaborate at GUADEC and at FOSDEM. This is also when the Foundation Board of Directors and Advisory Board have the chance to meet in person.

    In the four days leading up to the event, GTK Core Developer Emanuelle Bassi and Matthias Classen hosted a hackfest focused on GKT and the future of accessibility in GNOME. We really appreciate everyone who showed up, and would especially like to thank the blind participants and those with vision issues and expertise as those using the accessibility tools.

    [...]
    While Executive Director Neil McGovern and Director of Operations Rosanna Yuen met with the Board of Directors, I attended Sustain Summit. I led a session on diversity in open source with a focus on building global movements.

Tails 4.3 is out

Filed under
Security
Debian

This release fixes many security vulnerabilities. You should upgrade as soon as possible.

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EasyOS version 2.2.9 released

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

The above post also mentions renaming of /etc/init.d/messagebus to 05-messagebus, so that 'dbus-daemon' starts sooner. That fixed 'bluetoothd', but the question was raised whether there might be other repercussions.

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Debian: Ruby Team, Reproducible Builds and Individual DDs

Filed under
Debian

SparkyLinux 2020.02 Brings More Goodies from Debian GNU/Linux 11 “Bullseye”

Filed under
Debian

Using the Linux 5.4.13 kernel by default, SparkyLinux 2020.02 comes with up-to-date packages from the software repositories of the upcoming Debian GNU/Linux 11 “Bullseye” operating system. The entire system was synced with the Debian Testing repos as of February 9th, 2020.

If they want a newer kernel, users will also be able to install the latest and most advanced Linux 5.5.2 kernel, as well as the first RC (Release Candidate) of the upcoming Linux 5.6 kernel. Both kernels are available in SparkyLinux’s unstable repositories.

Included in the SparkyLinux 2020.02 release, there’s also the Calamares 3.2.18 graphical installer, Mozilla Firefox 72.0.2 web browser, Mozilla Thunderbird 68.4.2 email and news client, LibreOffice 6.4 office suite, VLC 3.0.8 media player, and Exaile 4.0.2 audio player.

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Secrecy in Debian/FSFE and Cryptie/Amandine Jambert

Filed under
Debian

  • Who really exposed Amandine 'cryptie' Jambert, CNIL/FSFE?

    There has been a lot of discussion this week about the ethics of revealing and discussing Amandine Jambert's real identity and connection between her CNIL and FSFE roles. Just as with the Mollamby scandal in Debian, it has been necessary to consider both privacy and public interest in the same equation.

    [...]

    This photo of the FSFE e.V. members was taken outside LinuxHotel, Essen, when they decided to impose more conflict on the free software community. Two of the resignations occurred immediately after this photo. Do these people owe Jambert and the rest of the community an apology?

  • Does debian-private violate the Debian Social Contract?

    There has recently been a lot of attention on the leaking of the first years of debian-private at Christmas 2019.

    There have been many other leaks in recent times too, for example, the revelations about Cryptie/Amandine Jambert, a CNIL employee undercover in FSFE (subscribe for more news like that).

    As professionals, we all know the importance of protecting sensitive data for our employers and clients. When you consider the number of people who have access to debian-private today, it is not exactly a private forum in the first place.

Raspbian OS for Raspberry Pi Adds Multi-Monitor Improvements, More

Filed under
OS
Debian

The new Raspbian release is here four months after the previous build to add various enhancements to the default file manager, PCManFM, such as a new “Places” pane at the top of the sidebar to display mounted volumes in the simplified view, as well as a “New Folder” icon to the taskbar.

Moreover, the file manager’s expanders have been updated to correctly display the state of subfolders in the directory browser. Also, the folder and file icons got a clean new design to make it clearer for users what file an icon represents.

Raspbian now also supports separate ALSA devices for internal audio outputs via the volume taskbar plugin and raspi-config. The volume taskbar plugin also got new mixer dialogs.

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