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Debian

Sparky 4.8 RC

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Debian

There is a new, testing live/install iso image of SparkyLinux 4.8 RC “Tyche” available to download. Sparky 4 is based on Debian stable line “Stretch”.

Sparky 4.8 RC is a release candidate to upcoming next 4.8 stable release.

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Debian Leftovers

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Debian

Neptune 5.1

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GNU
Linux
Debian

We are proud to announce version 5.1 of Neptune .

This update represents the current state of Neptune 5 and renews the ISO file so if you install Neptune you don't have to download tons of Updates.

The Calamares Installer now handles also installing hyphentation, thesaurus and spellecheck for the choosen localization.

Main changes in this version are the update of Plasma to version 5.12.4 and KDE Frameworks to version 5.44. Besides that we also updated our default icon theme to include some new icons and Plasma Discover got some minor fixes and a slightly improved UI now featuring a refresh button in the Update dialog.

Knetworkmounter should work like usual again and Enlightenment fans should be able to install their beloved desktop in version 0.22.

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Debian and Canonical: Build Tools, PET, LXD, MAAS

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • A tale of three Debian build tools

    Many people have asked me about my Debian workflow. Which is funny, because it's hard to believe that when you use three different build tools that you're doing it right, but I have figured out a process that works for me. I use git-buildpackage (gbp), sbuild, and pbuilder, each for different purposes. Let me describe why and how I use each, and the possible downsides of each tool.

    Note: This blog post is aimed at people already familiar with Debian packaging, particularly using Vcs-Git. If you'd like to learn more about the basics of Debian packaging, I recommend you check out my Clojure Packaging Tutorial and my talk about packaging Leiningen.

  • My Free Software Activities in March 2018

    Welcome to gambaru.de. Here is my monthly report that covers what I have been doing for Debian. If you’re interested in Java, Games and LTS topics, this might be interesting for you.

  • Migrating PET features to distro-tracker

    After joining the Debian Perl Team some time ago, PET has helped me a lot to find work to do in the team context, and also helped the whole team in our workflow. For those who do not know what PET is: “a collection of scripts that gather information about your (or your group’s) packages. It allows you to see in a bird’s eye view the health of hundreds of packages, instantly realizing where work is needed.”. PET became an important project since about 20 Debian teams were using it, including Perl and Ruby teams in which I am more active.

  • LXD weekly status #42

    As this was the week following our major 3.0 release, we’ve been very actively working on early bug reports and sorting out packaging for this in the distros.

    This led to quite a number of bugfixes being done, issues investigated and a large number of updates to our snap and Debian packages for the various components.

    We expect to keep this focus on bugfixing for the next 2-3 weeks so that we can ensure we meet our usual quality expectations after a major release and offer a smooth upgrade to our users. We’re also doing some work refreshing our 2.0 stable branches in preparation for the last major bugfix release of the projects before they enter the much slower security-only phase of their support.

  • Design and Web team summary – 10 April 2018

    The MAAS squad have been hard at work fixing any teething problems, since the release of the latest Vanilla on MAAS. The main focus has been on the spacing and padding in tables, to stop columns from wrapping.

Debian and Ubuntu: debhelper, Ubuntu on USB, Test Weeks, Free Culture Showcase

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Build system changes in debhelper

    Since debhelper/11.2.1[1], we now support using cmake for configure and ninja for build + test as an alternative to cmake for configure and make for build + test. This change was proposed by Kyle Edwards in Debian bug #895044. You can try this new combination by specifying “cmake+ninja” as build system.

  • Run Ubuntu 18.04 From USB Stick

    Ubuntu 18.04 is a great operating system. It is in beta at the time of this writing. Everyone is so excited and eagerly waiting for its release even as we speak. If you’re one of them, you may wish to carry your favorite Linux distribution with you all the time. Have you ever thought about running Ubuntu 18.04 from a USB stick? Well it is possible. You can run Ubuntu 18.04 from a USB stick. That way your workstation is with you wherever you go. You don’t have to use other people’s setup, you can use your own comfortable setup, also your favorite softwares.

  • Ubuntu Developer Floats The Idea Of "Test Weeks" To Replace Early Alpha/Beta Releases

    Prominent Ubuntu community developer Simon Quigley has sparked a discussion about Ubuntu's release milestones and the possibility of moving away with their alpha and beta one milestones moving forward.

    Quigley's proposal after consulting with the Xubuntu / Ubuntu MATE / Kubuntu / Ubuntu Budgie teams was using "testing weeks" to replace the previous formal alpha / beta releases. During testing weeks, users would be encouraged to use the latest daily ISOs rather than a blessed "alpha" or "beta" image.

  • Announcing the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Free Culture Showcase winners

    In just under 3 weeks, Ubuntu 18.04 LTS launches. This exciting new release is a new Long Term Support release and will introduce many Ubuntu users to GNOME Shell and a closer upstream experience. In addition, Ubuntu developers have been working long and hard to ensure that 18.04 is a big, brilliant release that builds a bridge from 16.04 LTS to a better, bigger platform that can be built upon, without becoming unnecessarily boisterous.

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Debian GNU/Linux Operating System Is Now Supported on 64-bit RISC-V Hardware

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Debian

If you want to use the Debian GNU/Linux operating system on 64-bit RISC-V devices, you should know that there's now an official port for the RISC-V 64-bit (riscv64) architecture in Debian infrastructure.

The announcement comes from developer Manuel Fernandez Montecelo, who said that after a few weeks of hard work, he and his team managed to do an official 64-bit RISC-V bootstrap, which is now available in Debian Project's debian-ports infrastructure for those who want to download packages on their RISC-V devices.

“We've been working in the last few weeks to do a (second) bootstrap of Debian for RISC-V, and after a few weeks of hard work it is now bootstrapped and has been imported into the Debian infrastructure, in particular, debian-ports," said Manuel Fernandez Montecelo in the announcement.

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BeagleBone-like SBC showcases AM335x SiP package

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Linux
Debian

Octavo’s open source, $199 “OSD3358-SM-RED” SBC is a BeagleBone-like development board with GbE and 4x USB ports for prototyping its Debian/AM335x based OSD335x-SM SIP modules.

Octavo Systems has developed its first self-branded SBC based on one of its SiP (system-in-package) modules. The open-spec OSD3358-SM-RED SBC uses the same OSD335x-SM SiP module found on BeagleBoard.org’s COM-like, 56 x 35mm PocketBeagle USB key-fob SBC. The 21 x 21mm SiP module, which packs a 1GHz Texas Instruments Sitara AM3358 SoC and nearly all the functions of a BeagleBone Black SBC into a BGA form factor, is 40 percent smaller than the original 27 x 27mm OSD335x SiP, which drives BeagleBoard.org’s BeagleBone Black Wireless SBC.

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Valve Defends Debian-Based SteamOS

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Debian
Gaming
  • Valve Reaffirms Commitment To Linux, SteamOS

    While there was a lot of hoopla recently about Valve removing the "Steam Machines" link from their main navigation on their website, Valve's Pierre-Loup Griffais has written a public post to reaffirm the company's commitment to Linux and SteamOS.

    While he acknowledges that Valve dropped the "Steam Machines" link as it wasn't getting much traffic, they are still committed to their Linux goals. "We're still working hard on making Linux operating systems a great place for gaming and applications. We think it will ultimately result in a better experience for developers and customers alike, including those not on Steam."

  • Valve confirms their continued support for Linux gaming

    It seems my recent article about Valve removing the link to the Steam Machines page caused quite a stir, so Valve have now confirmed their continued support for Linux gaming.

    Truthfully, I wasn't expecting my article to do anything, however I seem to have vastly underestimated just how many eyes there are on us now. Many larger tech and gaming sites picked it up from us like PC Gamer, Ars Technica (who amusingly called us a "fan site"), VG247 and so on. Many more sites then picked up the news from them (some claiming it was originally reported by others—oh well, can't win them all) and so it ended up as a much bigger story.

    We've had quite a lot of emails and notifications about this, including a Valve rep emailing us directly to link us to this post by Pierre-Loup Griffais, where they state that the removal of the Steam Machines link was part of a "routine cleanup" where it was removed based on "user traffic".

  • SteamOS, Linux, and Steam Machines

    We've noticed that what started out as a routine cleanup of the Steam Store navigation turned into a story about the delisting of Steam Machines. That section of the Steam Store is still available, but was removed from the main navigation bar based on user traffic. Given that this change has sparked a lot of interest, we thought it'd make sense to address some of the points we've seen people take away from it.

    While it's true Steam Machines aren't exactly flying off the shelves, our reasons for striving towards a competitive and open gaming platform haven't significantly changed. We're still working hard on making Linux operating systems a great place for gaming and applications. We think it will ultimately result in a better experience for developers and customers alike, including those not on Steam.

  • Valve Says It's Committed to Make Linux and SteamOS a Great Place for Gaming

    Valve has addressed the exaggerated disappearance of the Steam Machines section from the Steam Store that some users noticed last week, confirming Steam Machines, nor SteamOS and Linux support.

    Valve said that the Steam Machines section was delisted from the Steam Store navigation after a routine cleanup, but the page is still available here for those who want to purchase a gaming console powered by SteamOS, Valve's Debian-based GNU/Linux operating system for Steam Machines.

    User traffic has to do with the removal of the Steam Machines section from the main navigation bar of the Steam Store, and while it doesn't look like Valve plans to enable it again in the Steam Store navigation due to sluggish sales, it confirms their continued support for Linux gaming and SteamOS.

Debian: Another Debian Port (RISC-V), DebConf20 Plans

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Debian
  • Debian GNU/Linux port for RISC-V 64-bit (riscv64) in Debian infrastructure (debian-ports)

    tl;dr: We have a new port for RISC-V, flavour riscv64 (64-bits little-endian) in Debian Ports.

  • DebConf20 in a cruise

    The last editions of DebConf, the annual Debian conference, have been in unalike places like Heidelberg (Germany), Cape Town (South Africa) and Montreal (Canada). Next summer DebConf18 will happen in Hsinchu (Taiwan) and the location for DebConf19 is already decided: Curitiba (Brazil). During all these years an idea has been floating in the air (aka the Debian IRC channels) about organising a DebConf in a cruise. Today, the Debian Project is happy to announce that a group of Debian contributors have teamed-up to propose an actual bid for DebConf20 in a cruise.

APT for DPL Candidates

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Debian

Today is a special day for apt: 20 years ago after much discussion in the team as well as in the Debian project at large "APT" was born.

What happened in all these years? A lot! But if there is one common theme then it is that many useful APT features, tricks and changes are not as known to the general public or even most Debian Developers as they should be.

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Cinnamon 4.0 Will Tackle Screen Tearing on Linux Mint

Linux Mint plans to make more performance improvements to the Cinnamon desktop ahead of its next release. Similar work featured as part of Cinnamon 3.8, released as part of Linux Mint 19, and improved the responsiveness of launching apps on the desktop. For the next major release of the Cinnamon desktop environment, the team want to tackle another performance-related bugbear: screen tearing. “On modern NVIDIA GPUs we’re able to get rid of screen tearing by using “Force Composition Pipeline” in NVIDIA-Settings. With Vsync disabled in Cinnamon we then enjoy a faster desktop environments with no screen tearing,“, writes Cinnamon’s lead developer Clement Lefebvre in a recent blog post. Read more

4 open source media conversion tools for the Linux desktop

Ah, so many file formats—especially audio and video ones—can make for fun times if you get a file with an extension you don't recognize, if your media player doesn't play a file in that format, or if you want to use an open format. So, what can a Linux user do? Turn to one of the many open source media conversion tools for the Linux desktop, of course. Let's take a look at four of them. Read more

Android Leftovers

Launching Open Source Initiatives Is the Next Battleground In Quantum Computing

At a time when tech giants are ploughing millions of dollars in quantum computing and are striving ahead with breakthroughs, Google, Microsoft and IBM seem to be locked in an intense battle of quantum supremacy. Mountain View search giant announced Cirq — an open-source framework for NISQ computers. Cirq is an open-source initiative that allows developers to create algorithms that can run on a number of machines without having a full background in quantum physics. The Google blog notes that once installed — Cirq enables researchers to write quantum algorithms for specific quantum processors. “Cirq gives users fine-tuned control over quantum circuits, specifying gate behaviour using native gates, placing these gates appropriately on the device, and scheduling the timing of these gates within the constraints of the quantum hardware,” the blog notes. Cirq supports running these algorithms locally on a simulator and is designed to easily integrate with future quantum hardware or larger simulators via the cloud. Read more