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Debian

Debian and Tails: Development Reports and Tails 3.2

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Security
Debian
  • Monthly FLOSS activity - 2017/09 edition
  • Free Software Efforts (2017W39)

    Here’s my weekly report for week 39 of 2017. In this week I have travelled to Berlin and caught up on some podcasts in doing so. I’ve also had some trouble with the RSS feeds on my blog but hopefully this is all fixed now.

    Thanks to Martin Milbret I now have a replacement for my dead workstation, an HP Z600, and there will be a blog post about this new set up to come next week. Thanks also to Sýlvan and a number of others that made donations towards getting me up and running again. A breakdown of the donations and expenses can be found at the end of this post.

  • My Debian Activities in September 2017

    This month almost the same numbers as last month appeared in the statistics. I accepted 213 packages and rejected 15 uploads. The overall number of packages that got accepted this month was 425.

  • Tails 3.2: Privacy, Security, and Anonymity on the Internet Just Got Easier

    The operating system Ed Snowden used to communicate with journalists when he revealed the size and scope of NSA surveillance in 2013 received a major update Thursday. Tails (which stands for The Amnesic Incognito Live System) is a Linux distribution created and distributed by the Tails Project. Tails is built from the ground up to offer security, privacy, and anonymity to computer users everywhere.

    Tails — which is described by its developers as “privacy for anyone anywhere” — has been around since 2009 and has received the Mozilla Open Source Support Award (2016), the Access Innovation Prize (2014), and the OpenITP award (2013). More importantly, it has been used by dissidents in oppressive nations, activists who feel the need to remain anonymous, whistleblowers, and investigative journalists. In fact, the three journalists most involved in the Snowden revelations all used Tails when communicating with him about NSA surveillance. Snowden insisted on it. In April 2014, Freedom of the Press Foundation reported that Laura Poitras, Glenn Greenwald, and Barton Gellman all told the foundation that Tails was instrumental in allowing them to communicate with Snowden about NSA surveillance while avoiding the very surveillance they were preparing to report on.

Ubuntu, Pop!_OS, and Tails 3.2

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Canonical releases final beta of Ubuntu 17.10

    Canonical has released the final beta of Ubuntu 17.10 Artful Aardvark for Desktop, Server, and Cloud products. It represents the last major development before the release candidate which ships a week before the final release, which itself is scheduled for the October 19. Ubuntu 17.10 is not an LTS so it’ll be supported for just nine months.

  • Ubuntu Linux 17.10 'Artful Aardvark' Beta 2 now available to download

    Fall is officially here, and while some people get excited for pumpkin spice lattes and falling leaves, other folks get excited about something far nerdier -- Ubuntu. Yes, every October a new version of the Linux-based operating system is released. This year in particular is very significant, as with Ubuntu 17.10, GNOME is replacing Unity as the default desktop environment.

  • Ubuntu 17.10 Beta 2 Released With New Features — Download ISO And Torrent Files Here

    This year’s second Ubuntu release is just around the corner. Codenamed Artful Aardvark, Ubuntu 17.10’s Final Beta has landed and its download links are available for testing. Ubuntu 17.10 final will be released on October 19, 2017.

    You might be knowing that the flagship version of Ubuntu, which now ships with GNOME desktop environment, doesn’t take part in Alpha 1, Alpha 2, and Beta 1 milestone releases. So, in a way, it’s the first, polished chance to try out all the new Ubuntu 17.10 features.

  • Ubuntu to Stop Offering 32-Bit ISO Images, Joining Many Other Linux Distros

    Canonical engineer Dimitri John Ledkov announced on Wednesday that Ubuntu does not plan to offer 32-bit ISO installation images for its new OS version starting with the next release — Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) scheduled for release on October 19.

    The decision comes after month-long discussions on the dwindling market share of 32-bit architectures.

  • Ubuntu 17.10 Final Beta Is Ready For Testing

    Overnight the final beta of Ubuntu 17.10 "Artful Aardvark" was released for Ubuntu proper and its derivative friends.

  • Ubuntu to drop 32bit Desktop ISO images from 17.10 release

    Unsurprisingly, Ubuntu has planned to follow the same path that other major distributions have, and drop 32bit ISO images for upcoming releases.

    Dimitri John Ledkov from Canonical, sent out a message through their mailing list to the release team, instructing them to not release a 32bit ISO for the upcoming Ubuntu release.

  • System76 Pop!_OS Beta Ubuntu-based Linux Distro For Developers Is Here
  • Tails 3.2 released with several changes and Linux 4.12

    Whenever Mozilla pushes out a new version of its Firefox web browser, you can always guarantee that an update to the Tor Browser and the Tails operating system will be close behind, alas, with Firefox 56 being released on Thursday, Tails 3.2 followed close behind. The release ships with Linux Kernel 4.12.12 which should improve hardware support if you've been having any issues, the NVIDIA Maxwell graphics card is a notable bit of kit supported by the new kernel.

SparkyLinux 5.1 "Nibiru" OS Released, It's Based on Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster"

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Debian

The SparkyLinux development team announced the release of SparkyLinux 5.1 rolling operating system for 32-bit and 64-bit computers, an incremental update bringing the latest components and technologies.

Dubbed "Nibiru," the SparkyLinux 5.1 images are here only two weeks after the release of SparkyLinux 5.0, and they've been synced with the Debian Testing repos as of September 25, 2017, which means that the entire distribution is currently based on the upcoming Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" operating system.

Read more

Original: Sparky 5.1

Tails 3.2 is out

Filed under
Security
Debian

This release fixes many security issues and users should upgrade as soon as possible.

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Knoppix 8.1 Now Available For A Retro Linux Experience In 2017

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

Knoppix 8.1 is now available although no release announcement has yet to hit the wire. As it's been some years since last trying out Knoppix, I decided to fire up this new release.

With recalling fond memories of Knoppix during its early height as being the first/best Debian live CD but somewhat fading away in recent years, I was curious to try out Knoppix 8.1 when being alerted to it by a German Phoronix reader.

Read more

Also: Ubuntu Is Dropping 32-bit Desktop Images

Subgraph OS Alpha and NuTyX 9.1

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian
  • A new Subgraph OS Alpha ISO is available for download.

    This is a release mainly targeting some bugs that were present in the last available ISO.

    We are working on some major new features that aren't done yet or aren't yet robust enough to be included in a release to users. Some of those new features are described below.

    We really should have released an ISO sooner than this as there were some annoying bugs that got in the way of new users trying Subgraph OS for the first time. We've setup a new, more aggressive release schedule and should be making non-release ISO builds available as we produce them monthly.

  • NuTyX 9.1 available with cards 2.3.3.0

    The NuTyX team is please to annonce the 9.1 release of NuTyX.

    NuTyX 9.0 comes with kernel lts 4.9.23, glibc 2.25, gcc 6.3.0, binutils 2.28, python 3.6.0, xorg-server 1.19.2, qt 5.8.0, plasma 5.9.4, kf5 5.31.0, gnome 3.22.2, mate 1.18.0, xfce4 4.12.3, firefox 54.0.1, etc....

    New Isos are available in 32 bits and 64 bits. sizes are respectively 246 MB and 247 MB on http://downloads.nutyx.org

    This is a maintenance release of the 9.0 branche of NuTyX. It is possible to make an upgrade of your system without problems. It's no need to reinstall your NuTyX. If the automatic upgrade process is activate, it will be done at next shutdown.

    Available graphical interfaces are: kde5, gnome, mate, xfce4, lxde, flwm, jwm, ratpoison, blackbox, fluxbox, openbox, bspwm, icewm, twm, etc.

End of Debian-Administration.org and 32-bit Support in Manjaro Linux

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Debian
  • Retiring the Debian-Administration.org site

    So previously I've documented the setup of the Debian-Administration website, and now I'm going to retire it I'm planning how that will work.

  • Manjaro Linux Discontinues 32-bit Support

    You might already know that I love Manjaro Linux. And as an ardent Manjaro Linux fan, I have a bad news for you.

    Recently, Philip, the lead developer of Manjaro Linux, announced that the project would be dropping support for the 32-bit architecture. He said that the reason for the move was “due to the decreasing popularity of i686 among the developers and the community”.

Debian/Ubuntu: Q4OS, Ubuntu Dock and LXD Weekly Status Update

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • There's Now a Windows 10 Installer for the Debian-Based Q4OS Linux Distribution

    The Q4OS development team is pleased to inform us today about the immediate availability for download of a Windows installer for their Debian-based GNU/Linux distribution, Q4OS, allowing users to create a dual-boot environment on their PCs.

    For those not familiar to Q4OS, it's an open-source and free Linux distro based on the popular Debian GNU/Linux operating system and built around the Trinity Desktop Environment (TDE), which resembles the look and feel of the old-school KDE 3.5 desktop environment.

    Created with an emphasis on Windows users who want to migrate to a free, open-source, and more secure operating system, Q4OS now lets them install the distribution alongside Microsoft Windows in an easy manner, without having to do any modifications to your personal computer or install any other apps.

  • Ubuntu Dock Now Has Dynamic Transparency

    Ubuntu devs have listened to our gripe on the jarring contrast between GNOME 3.26's transparent top bar and the Ubuntu Dock.

  • Ubuntu Dock Features Adaptive Transparency on Ubuntu 17.10, Here's How It Works

    Ubuntu contributor Didier Roche continues his development on the look and feel of the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system, and today he announced that Ubuntu Dock is getting adaptive transparency.

    Canonical confirmed that Ubuntu 17.10 would come with the GNOME 3.26 desktop environment by default, though the default session has suffered numerous modifications compared to the vanilla one to make things easier for those using the Unity interface on Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) or Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus).

    Most probably, Ubuntu 16.04 LTS users won't upgrade to Ubuntu 17.10, but we're sure Ubuntu 17.04 users will because it'll reach end of life in about four months from the moment of writing, sometime in January 2018. Therefore, Canonical wants to make their Unity to GNOME transition as painless as possible.

  • LXD: Weekly Status #15

    This week has been pretty quiet as far as upstream changes since half the team was attending the Open Source Summity, the Linux Plumbers Conference and the Linux Security Summit in Los Angeles, California.

Debian Development Reports

Filed under
Development
Debian
  • Free software log (July and August 2017)

    August was DebConf, which included a ton of Policy work thanks to Sean Whitton's energy and encouragement. During DebConf, we incorporated work from Hideki Yamane to convert Policy to reStructuredText, which has already made it far easier to maintain. (Thanks also to David Bremner for a lot of proofreading of the result.) We also did a massive bug triage and closed a ton of older bugs on which there had been no forward progress for many years.

    After DebConf, as expected, we flushed out various bugs in the reStructuredText conversion and build infrastructure. I fixed a variety of build and packaging issues and started doing some more formatting cleanup, including moving some footnotes to make the resulting document more readable.

  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, August 2017

    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #125

    16 package reviews have been added, 99 have been updated and 92 have been removed in this week, adding to our knowledge about identified issues.

Debian: Tails 3.2 RC, Debian Policy, and Mini-DebConf 2017 Conference

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Debian
  • Tails 3.2 release candidate has been released for testing

    The LiveUSB Linux distribution, Tails (the amnesic incognito live system), has received a new release candidate for the upcoming 3.2 update that’s due out on the 26th of this month. The update comes with some big under-the-hood changes to the system which should improve hardware support and the email experience.

    If you’ve ever decided to try Tails on newer hardware, you may have had some driver issues; with this release, Tails ships with the Linux 4.12.12 kernel which is one of the latest. With it, users will get a better hardware experience; for example, the NVIDIA Maxwell series of graphics cards are now supported.

  • Debian Policy call for participation -- September 2017
  • Mini-DebConf 2017 Debian Conference to Take Place November 23-26 in Cambridge UK

    Debian developer and leader of the debian-cd project Steve McIntyre announced the official dates and schedule of this year's Mini-DebConf conference for Debian developers and users.

    The Mini-DebConf 2017 conference will take place for four days, from Thursday, November 23 until Sunday, November 26, and it will be hosted at Arm's office in Cambridge, United Kingdom. Arm is Steve McIntyre's employer and the industry's leading supplier of microprocessors for embedded and IoT devices.

    "I'm organizing another mini-DebConf in Cambridge this year. Again, my employer Arm is going to host the conference for four days in November," said Steve McIntyre in the mailing list announcement. "I'm also hoping to find sponsors again to cover some other costs for the conference for things like food - please contact me if you can help!"

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KaOS 2018.01 KDE-focused Linux distro now available with Spectre and Meltdown fixes

It can be difficult to find a quality Linux distribution that meets your needs. This is partly because there are just too many operating systems from which to choose. My suggestion is to first find a desktop environment that you prefer, and then narrow down your distro search to one that focuses on that DE. For instance, if you like KDE, both Kubuntu and Netrunner are solid choices. With all of that said, there is another KDE-focused Linux distro that I highly recommend. Called "KaOS," it is rolling release, meaning you can alway be confident that your computer is running modern packages. Today, KaOS gets its first updated ISO for 2018, and you should definitely use it to upgrade your install media. Why? Because version 2018.01 has fixes for Spectre and Meltdown thanks to Linux kernel 4.14.14 with both AMD and Intel ucode. Read more

Today in Techrights

KDE: Linux and Qt in Automotive, KDE Discover, Plasma5 18.01 in Slackware

  • Linux and Qt in Automotive? Let’s meet up!
    For anyone around the Gothenburg area on Feb 1st, you are most welcome to the Automotive MeetUp held at the Pelagicore and Luxoft offices. There will be talks about Qt/QML, our embedded Linux platform PELUX and some ramblings about open source in automotive by yours truly ;-)
  • What about AppImage?
    I see a lot of people asking about state of AppImage support in Discover. It’s non-existent, because AppImage does not require centralized software management interfaces like Discover and GNOME Software (or a command-line package manager). AppImage bundles are totally self-contained, and come straight from the developer with zero middlemen, and can be managed on the filesystem using your file manager This should sound awfully familiar to former Mac users (like myself), because Mac App bundles are totally self-contained, come straight from the developer with zero middlemen, and are managed using the Finder file manager.
  • What’s new for January? Plasma5 18.01, and more
    When I sat down to write a new post I noticed that I had not written a single post since the previous Plasma 5 announcement. Well, I guess the past month was a busy one. Also I bought a new e-reader (the Kobo Aura H2O 2nd edition) to replace my ageing Sony PRS-T1. That made me spend a lot of time just reading books and enjoying a proper back-lit E-ink screen. What I read? The War of the Flowers by Tad Williams, A Shadow all of Light by Fred Chappell, Persepolis Rising and several of the short stories (Drive, The Butcher of Anderson Station, The Churn and Strange Dogs) by James SA Corey and finally Red Sister by Mark Lawrence. All very much worth your time.

GNU/Linux: Live Patching, Gravity of Kubernetes, Welcome to 2018

  • How Live Patching Has Improved Xen Virtualization
    The open-source Xen virtualization hypervisor is widely deployed by enterprises and cloud providers alike, which benefit from the continuous innovation that the project delivers. In a video interview with ServerWatch, Lars Kurth, Chairman of the Xen Project Advisory Board and Director, Open Source Solutions at Citrix, details some of the recent additions to Xen and how they are helping move the project forward.
  • The Gravity of Kubernetes
    Most new internet businesses started in the foreseeable future will leverage Kubernetes (whether they realize it or not). Many old applications are migrating to Kubernetes too. Before Kubernetes, there was no standardization around a specific distributed systems platform. Just like Linux became the standard server-side operating system for a single node, Kubernetes has become the standard way to orchestrate all of the nodes in your application. With Kubernetes, distributed systems tools can have network effects. Every time someone builds a new tool for Kubernetes, it makes all the other tools better. And it further cements Kubernetes as the standard.
  • Welcome to 2018
    The image of the technology industry as a whole suffered in 2017, and that process is likely to continue this year as well. That should lead to an increased level of introspection that will certainly affect the free-software community. Many of us got into free software to, among other things, make the world a better place. It is not at all clear that all of our activities are doing that, or what we should do to change that situation. Expect a lively conversation on how our projects should be run and what they should be trying to achieve. Some of that introspection will certainly carry into projects related to machine learning and similar topics. There will be more interesting AI-related free software in 2018, but it may not all be beneficial. How well will the world be served, for example, by a highly capable, free facial-recognition system and associated global database? Our community will be no more effective than anybody else at limiting progress of potentially freedom-reducing technologies, but we should try harder to ensure that our technologies promote and support freedom to the greatest extent possible. Our 2017 predictions missed the fact that an increasing number of security problems are being found at the hardware level. We'll not make the same mistake in 2018. Much of what we think of as "hardware" has a great deal of software built into it — highly proprietary software that runs at the highest privilege levels and which is not subject to third-party review. Of course that software has bugs and security issues of its own; it couldn't really be any other way. We will see more of those issues in 2018, and many of them are likely to prove difficult to fix.