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Debian

Debian and Ubuntu: /etc/motd, HackerNews, Default Apps For 18.04 LTS, EoL, and Ubunsys

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Fear and Loathing in Debian^H^H^H^H^H^H/Ubuntu (or: who needs /etc/motd)

    You know what’s even better then making something overcomplicated? Changing decades of expected behavior and not providing a way to, say, opt out. I don’t want to run a fuckload of stupid shell scripts every time I login that do super informative tasks like telling me the IP address assigned to my loopback device. I also don’t want to be told that I should use Landscape, or that there are 83 processes running on my machine.

  • ThankHN: A Thank-You Note to the HackerNews Community, from Ubuntu

    A huge THANK YOU to the entire HackerNews community, from the Ubuntu community!  Holy smokes...wow...you are an amazing bunch!  Your feedback in the thread, "Ask HN: What do you want to see in Ubuntu 17.10?" is almost unbelievable!

    We're truly humbled by your response.

    I penned this thread, somewhat on a whim, from the Terminal 2 lounge at London Heathrow last Friday morning before flying home to Austin, Texas.  I clicked "submit", closed my laptop, and boarded an 11-hour flight, wondering if I'd be apologizing to my boss and colleagues later in the day, for such a cowboy approach to Product Management...

  • Ubuntu Is Trying To Figure Out The Default Apps For 18.04 LTS

    Canonical is running a survey in trying to figure out what should be the default applications for next year's Ubuntu 18.04 LTS release.

  • Ubuntu 16.10 reaches end of life

    Nine months after its release, the "Yakkety Yak" Ubuntu release, also carrying the version number 16.10, reaches its last day of support. Those still using it should upgrade to Ubuntu 17.04.

  • Ubunsys An Advanced System Utility for Ubuntu (Dangerous As Well)

    Ubunsys gives you power to access some dangerous features of your Ubuntu system. It is an advanced system utility application designed for Ubuntu to manage you system with just mouse clicks. It can be help with package list, able to do changes on system configuration, updates, execute improves, fixes, executing actions to blow of mouse click.

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Hands-on with Sparky Linux 5, powered by Debian

Filed under
Linux
Debian

I mentioned in my recent post about the release of Debian 9 (stretch) that the changes in Debian should soon start filtering through into the Debian-derived distributions. Sure enough, Sparky Linux announced a new release last weekend.

Sparky Linux is one of the few distributions which offers two versions, based on the Debian stable and testing branches. The new release is Sparky Linux 5, based on Debian testing.

The release announcement gives a brief overview, but because this version of Sparky is a rolling release distribution, there are not huge changes from the previous version.

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Debian-Based Elive 3.0 Linux OS Is Almost Here, New Beta Adds More Improvements

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Debian

The development team behind the Debian-based Elive GNU/Linux distribution was proud to announce today the availability for download of a new Beta version towards the upcoming Elive 3.0 major release.

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Elive 2.9.5 beta released

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Debian

The Elive Team is proud to announce the release of the beta version 2.9.5

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Netrunner, Slackware and Debian Updates

Filed under
Slack
Debian
  • Netrunner Rolling 2017.07 released

    The Netrunner Team is happy to announce the release of Netrunner Rolling 2017.07 – 64bit ISO.

  • July 17 updates – Plasma 5, Live ISOS and more

    To celebrate I have created some goodies for you. Nothing you can eat or drink…

    First, Plasma 5 updates.

    I have uploaded the July ’17 set of Plasma 5 packages for Slackware 14.2 and -current to the ‘ktown’ repository. KDE 5_17.07 contains: KDE Frameworks 5.36.0, Plasma 5.10.3 and Applications 17.04.3. All based on Qt 5.9.0 for Slackware-current and Qt 5.7.1 for Slackware 14.2.

  • Calibre and rar support

    Thanks to the cooperation with upstream authors and the maintainer Martin Pitt, the Calibre package in Debian is now up-to-date at version 3.4.0, and has adopted a more standard packaging following upstream. In particular, all the desktop files and man pages have been replaced by what is shipped by Calibre. What remains to be done is work on RAR support.

Debian vs. Linux Mint

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

Linux Mint is an independent distribution, but it continues to have close links with Debian. Since 2015, Mint and Debian have had the largest number of page hits on Distrowatch, with Ubuntu closely behind them. However, although both have a similar record for stability and software choice, small differences between the two may make you prefer one over the other.

Because of its history, Debian has a reputation for being an expert's distribution. Increasingly, this reputation is undeserved -- at least if you can follow instructions during installation. Today, Debian's home page labels it "the universal operating system," hinting at its efforts to support as many different types of hardware and levels of user as possible.

By contrast, Linux Mint is intended more at new users. Its About page summarizes this focus by stating that "The purpose of Linux Mint is to produce a modern, elegant and comfortable operating system which is both powerful and easy to use."

However, these statements give only the broadest overviews of the differences between the two distributions. Installation, desktop environments, administration and package management all combine to make using Linux Mint a different experience from booting up Debian.

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SolydXK 9 Linux OS Debuts Based on Debian 9 Stretch, Drops Raspberry Pi Support

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OS
Linux
Debian

The developers of the Debian-based SolydXK GNU/Linux distribution announced today the release and immediate availability for download of the SolydXK 9 operating system series.

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Debian, Devuan, and Ubuntu/Yunit

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Parrot Linux 3.7 Review Featured with Kernel 4.11 , Debian GNU/Linux 10 Buster, Debian 10 Testing

    A rumor went out in the Linux world that Parrot developer team is trying to switch from Debian GNU / Linux to Devuan GNU/Linux. After the release , they wiped out this rumor via a tweet “Our release team is evaluating a possible migration of our project from Debian to Devuan,”.

    It seems that Parrot developer team is not ready yet to work with Devuan. They mentioned this in a Facebook Status —“It is not an easy migration and we have still to decide what to do.”

  • [Older but no more paywall] A little surprise in the Ubuntu motd

    At the end of June, Zachary Fouts noticed something on his Ubuntu system that surprised him a bit: an entry in the "message of the day" (motd) that looked, at least to some, like an advertisement. That is, of course, not what anyone expects from their free-software system; it turns out that it wasn't an ad at all, though it was worded ambiguously and could be (and was) interpreted that way. As the discussion in the bug Fouts filed shows, the "ad" came about from a useful feature that may or not have been somewhat abused—that determination depends on the observer.

    It is a longstanding Unix tradition to print a message of the day when users log in; in ages past, administrators would often note upcoming software upgrades and/or maintenance downtime that way. Typically that message has come from the /etc/motd file, but Ubuntu has long had a way to dynamically generate messages from local system information (e.g. number of package updates or reboot needed) using scripts in the /etc/update-motd.d/ directory. In Ubuntu 17.04, a new script was added that reaches out to a URL and grabs what it finds there to display as the motd. 

    [...]

     Ubuntu Product Manager Dustin Kirkland, who is the author of the original dynamic motd as well as the new motd-news feature, soon arrived in the bug thread (after commenting in a related Hacker News thread). In a lengthy comment, he explained how motd-news works along with some history and functioning of the dynamic motd feature he developed back in 2009. He described how Ubuntu is using the feed and how it can be configured to consult a local URL to get news items that would be displayed instead of (or in addition to) the official feed. There are several categories of messages that will be added, including internet-wide problems (such as Heartbleed) or important information about Ubuntu itself (like an EOL date reminder).

  • Yunit packages for ubuntu 16.04 LTS

    The release of Yunit packages for ubuntu 16.04 LTS marks or first milestone, regarding the availability of Yunit for all the supported platforms. Our next steps is to setup a CI infrastructure which will give us the ability to actually start working with the code and start improving Yunit by either fixing existing unity 8 bugs in launchpad or developing new features.

Debian vs. Ubuntu: What's the Difference?

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu

For the last four years, Debian and Ubuntu have been in the top three Linux distributions on Distrowatch. Since 2005, neither has been out of the top six. Together, they form one of the greatest influences on Linux development, and that influence seems likely to continue for the foreseeable future. They remain closely related, although if you look closely subtle differences in direction and orientation start to emerge

You may have heard that Debian is a distribution for experts, and Ubuntu for beginners. That is true, so far as it goes. However, that distinction is more historic than contemporary.

After Ubuntu burst on to the scene in late 2004, it spent several years making the desktop easier to use, especially for non-English speakers. However, thanks to free licenses, Ubuntu's improvements have spread to most desktop environments.

Moreover, Ubuntu's days of interface innovations are largely in the past. Under the direction of the parent company Canonical, Ubuntu development has been focused elsewhere. For over six years, the emphasis was on the development of the Unity desktop into a common interface for phones, tablets, and desktops. Meanwhile, Canonical seems more concerned with OpenStack, embedded systems and servers. Although the recent abandonment of Unity in favor of GNOME could mean a return to innovation on the Ubuntu desktop, it is still too early to tell. For now, Ubuntu seems no more innovative than Debian.

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Also: Ubuntu-Based ExTiX Linux Distro Now Ships with the Budgie Desktop Environment

Debian 9 Stretch - Not by a long stretch

Filed under
Reviews
Debian

Debian 9 Stretch is a horrible disappointment. It's a completely unusable product in my scenario, and I see no real reason why I should bother using it. Ubuntu and friends offer a superior experience. Perhaps Debian serves a purposes somewhere, but I fail to see it. What really irks me is that in six or so years since I've last tried it, it's as if nothing at all has changed. Exactly the same kind of issues, only different hardware and kernel modules.

Perhaps without Debian we wouldn't have Ubuntu and such. For that matter, we also wouldn't have pyramids without slaves. But that does not mean we should be grateful for slavery in giving us big stony architecture. Similarly, Debian may be a baseline for many other distributions. But on its own, without a thick layer of customization and changes, it fails horribly on the desktop. This test makes me sad and angry. Because I know an end when I see one. It's still a few years away, but it will inevitably come. Anyway, completely not recommended. My last venture into Debian this way. We're done.

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PC-MOS/386 is the latest obsolete operating system to open source on Github

PC-MOS/386 was first announced by The Software Link in 1986 and was released in early 1987. It was capable of working on any x86 computer (though the Intel 80386 was its target market). However, some later chips became incompatible because they didn't have the necessary memory management unit. It had a dedicated following but also contained a couple of design flaws that made it slow and/or expensive to run. Add to that the fact it had a Y2K bug that manifested on 31 July 2012, after which any files created wouldn't work, and it's not surprising that it didn't become the gold standard. The last copyright date listed is 1992, although some users have claimed to be using it far longer. Read more