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Debian

Debian Security and More

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Debian

Debian Leftovers

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Debian
  • My Debian Activities in April 2018

    This month I accepted 145 packages and rejected 5 uploads. The overall number of packages that got accepted this month was 260.

  • Debian/TeX Live 2018.20180505-1

    The first big bunch of updates of TeX Live 2018. During the freeze for DVD production, several bugs have been found and fixed. In particular compatibility of csqoutes with the shiny new LaTeX release, as well as some other related fixes. That hopefully will fix most if not all build failures that were introduced with the TL2018 upload.

New in Debian and OpenSUSE

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Debian
SUSE
  • Bits from Debian: New Debian Developers and Maintainers (April and May 2018)

    The following contributors got their Debian Developer accounts in the last two months:

        Andreas Boll (aboll)
        Dominik George (natureshadow)
        Julien Puydt (jpuydt)
        Sergio Durigan Junior (sergiodj)
        Robie Basak (rbasak)
        Elena Grandi (valhalla)
        Peter Pentchev (roam)
        Samuel Henrique (samueloph)

    The following contributors were added as Debian Maintainers in the last two months:

        Andy Li
        Alexandre Rossi
        David Mohammed
        Tim Lunn
        Rebecca Natalie Palmer
        Andrea Bolognani
        Toke Høiland-Jørgensen
        Gabriel F. T. Gomes
        Bjorn Anders Dolk
        Geoffroy Youri Berret
        Dmitry Eremin-Solenikov

    Congratulations!

  •  

  • Results in for openSUSE Board Elections

    This year’s openSUSE Board elections produced the longest election period in the history of the project.

    The four phases of the election, which included an application phase for new membership in phase one, lasted almost two months.

    The results of the elections ended in the success of 237 out of 400 people voting in this year’s election, which is a record both in participation percentage (59.25 percent) and in actual voters (237).

Major Debian Linux Kernel Patch Fixes 8-Year-Old Privilege Escalation Flaw

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Linux
Debian

First and foremost, the security update again patches Debian GNU/Linux's kernel against both variants of the Spectre vulnerability (CVE-2017-5715 and CVE-2017-5753). These could allow an attacker that has control over an unprivileged process to read memory from arbitrary addresses, including kernel memory.

While Spectre Variant 2 was mitigated for the x86 architecture (amd64 and i386) via the retpoline compiler feature, Spectre Variant 1 was mitigated by first identifying the vulnerable code sections and then replacing the array access with the speculation-safe array_index_nospec() function.

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Debian and Canonical/Ubuntu Leftovers

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • TeX Live 2018 released

    I guess everyone knows it already, Karl has released TeX Live 2018 officially just when I was off for some mountaineering, but perfectly in time for the current BachoTeX meeting.

  • Debian Policy call for participation -- May 2018

    We had a release of Debian Policy near the beginning of last month but there hasn’t been much activity since then.

  • Launchpad news, June 2017 – April 2018

    Once again it’s been a while since we posted a general update, so here’s a changelog-style summary of what we’ve been up to.  As usual, this changelog preserves a reasonable amount of technical detail, but I’ve omitted changes that were purely internal refactoring with no externally-visible effects.

  • Ubuntu 18.04 LTS: multi-cloud, and containers and AI, oh my!

    Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu, recently introduced the new Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, optimized for security, multi-cloud, containers and AI. Canonical’s Distribution of Kubernetes (CDK) runs on public clouds, VMware, OpenStack, and bare metal and delivers the latest upstream version, currently Kubernetes 1.10. After the initial three-step guided deployment, the distribution supports upgrades to future versions of Kubernetes, expansion of the Kubernetes cluster on demand, and integration with optional components for storage, networking and monitoring. A range of partners deliver their solutions on CDK, such as Rancher 2.0.

Debian, Ubuntu, and Pop!_OS Linux

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Debian LTS work, April 2018

    I was assigned 15 hours of work by Freexian's Debian LTS initiative and carried over 2 hours from March. I worked all 17 hours.

    In support of the "retpoline" mitigation for Spectre variant 2, I added a backport of gcc-4.9 to wheezy (as gcc-4.9-backport), based on work by Roberto Sánchez and on the existing gcc-4.8 backport (gcc-mozilla). I also updated the linux-tools package to support building external modules with retpolines enabled. Finally, I completed an update to the linux package, but delayed uploading it until 1st May due to an embargoed issue.

  • What’s New in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Bionic Beaver

    Ubuntu 18.04 LTS codenamed “Bionic Beaver” is the latest release of Ubuntu Linux Distribution, has been released and announced by Canonical, On April 26. As seventh long-term support, it will be supported with security and software updates for 5 years, until April 2023, during which it will receive no less than five maintenance updates, each one bringing updated kernel and graphics stacks from newer Ubuntu releases.

  • Ubuntu 18.04, Bionic Beaver, is Officially Released
  • Pop!_OS 18.04 Released — Get System76’s Beautiful Ubuntu-based Linux Distro Here

    Out of the large crop of PC manufactures out there, System76 is one of the very few ones with a focus on Linux-based operating systems. Last year wh±en Ubuntu decided to ditch Unity development and switch back to GNOME, System76 chose to fork Ubuntu and create something new and beautiful.

  • Mozilla's New Privacy-Conscious Approach to Sponsored Content, Atari Announces Pre-Sale Date of Atari VCS, New Kali Linux Release and More

    System76 released Pop!_OS Linux 18.04 recently, which is based on Canonical's Ubuntu 18.04, Softpedia News reports. This new version features "a brand new installer, new power management features, firmware notifications, and proper HiDPI support".

Ubuntu and Debian Leftovers

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) Has Been Released | Top 10 Major Changes

    The final stable release of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) is now officially available to download. Let’s check what’s new in Ubuntu 18.04 (Bionic Beaver) and Download options for all desktop environments as well.

    Early this month we had posted about the final development release for Ubuntu 18.04 (Bionic Beaver) and since the last development release Ubuntu has received many bug fixes and several improvements to the user interface for Gnome Shell Desktop environment. So, let’s check the key features of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver).

  • Best 20 Fonts for Ubuntu

    In recent years, many business firms including non software development companies are leaning towards Ubuntu which is a highly customizable open-source and one of the most secure operating systems. Companies carry out many tasks in a day and for that they need the best operating system and Ubuntu has all those features. Shifting from Windows to Ubuntu is not easy hence many people find it difficult to get used to Ubuntu in early days.

  • [Older] Debian VS Ubuntu: Is There a Clear Winner?

    Debian and Ubuntu have many things in common, and it’s only natural for Linux users to wonder whether one is better than the other. To provide an adequate answer, it’s necessary to compare several aspects of the two popular distributions.

  • FLOSS Activities April 2018
  • Chris Lamb: Free software activities in April 2018

Debian Milestones and Diversity Update

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Debian
  • 15.010958904109589041

    And yes! On April 15, I passed the 15-year-mark as a Debian Developer.

  • 10 years + 1 day

    yesterday 10 years ago I became a Debian Developer.

  • Diversity Update

    Which brings us to a panel for the upcoming Debconf in Taiwan. There is a suggestion to have a Gender Forum at the Openday. I'm still not completely sure what it should cover or what is expected for it and I guess it's still open for suggestions. There will be a plan, let's see to make it diverse and great!

    I won't promise to send the next update sooner, but I'll try to get back into it. Right now I'm also working on a (German language) submission for a non-binary YouTube project and it would be great to see that thing lift off. I'll be more verbose on that front.

Debian, Elive, and Ubuntu

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Re-elected as Debian Project Leader

    I have been extremely proud to have served as the Debian Project Leader since my election in early 2017. During this time I've learned a great deal about the inner workings of the Project as well as about myself. I have grown as a person thanks to all manner of new interactions and fresh experiences.

    I believe is a privilege simply to be a Debian Developer, let alone to be selected as their representative. It was therefore an even greater honour to learn that I have been re-elected by the community for another year. I profoundly and wholeheartedly thank everyone for placing their trust in me for another term.

  • Elive 3.0 is ALMOST here!

    Elive's latest beta, 2.9.90, was released a couple of weeks ago.
    According to the description, this is the last beta before the official release of version 3.0.

    I have been waiting for Elive for quite a long time.
    My first contact with it was through a live CD of version 2.0 Topaz in 2010, when I had recently migrated to Linux. I was truly impressed by the beauty and polish of the distro. I never installed it, though. I was put off by the fact that it was the only distro that could not be installed unless one paid for an installing module. Back then, I assumed that free software had to be "gratis".

  • NGINX Updates: Ubuntu Bionic, and Mainline and Stable PPAs

    Ubuntu Bionic 18.04 now has 1.14.0 in the repositories, and very likely will have 1.14.0 for the lifecycle of 18.04 from April of 2018 through April of 2023, as soon as it is released.

  • gksu removed from Ubuntu

Debian 11 "Bullseye" & Debian 12 "Bookworm" Are Coming After Debian 10 "Buster"

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Debian

While we're waiting for the Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" operating system series to be released, it looks like the Debian Release Team announced the codenames for the next two upcoming releases.

Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" is already halfway through its development cycle, and the release team recently published an update to inform users and developers about the release dates of various upcoming milestones, such as Transition Freeze on 12 January 2019, Soft Freeze on 12 February 2019, and Full Freeze on 12 March 2019, as well as the approximate final release date.

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OSS Leftovers

  • Uber Open Sources Its Large Scale Metrics Platform M3
    Uber's engineering team released its metrics platform M3, which it has been using internally for some years, as open source. The platform was built to replace its Graphite based system, and provides cluster management, aggregation, collection, storage management, a distributed time series database (TSDB) and a query engine with its own query language M3QL. [...] M3's query engine provides a single global view of all metrics without cross region replication. Metrics are written to local regional M3DB instances and replication is local to a region. Queries go to both the regional local instances as well as to coordinators in remote regions where metrics are stored. The results are aggregated locally, and future work is planned wherein  any query aggregation would happen at the remote coordinators.
  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Dev.to
    This week’s highlighted project comes courtesy of a community of developers who hope that their codebase will be used to foster communities like theirs, focused on education and collaboration among peers of any skill level. Dev.to’s codebase is open-source as of last week week and the community-building platform’s developers think that further community involvement in development will lead to great things. [...] Halpern made sure to clarify in the post that this release is not simply a library for creating the types of community-driven communication platforms that dev.to embodies, but the for-profit company’s entire codebase. “However, that is a perfectly valid use case in the future,” Halpern wrote in a post leading up to the release. “If you are interested in contributing such that we can eventually help people stand up their own version of this platform for their own business or society, we’ll definitely welcome that input.” The platform is a Ruby on Rails app with a Preact front-end. The company is hard at work on native apps for iOS and Android but say its technology choices are fluid.
  • RLS 1.0 release candidate
    The current version of the Rust Language Server (RLS), 0.130.5, is the first 1.0 release candidate. It is available on nightly and beta channels, and from the 3rd September will be available with stable Rust. 1.0 for the RLS is a somewhat arbitrary milestone. We think the RLS can handle most small and medium size projects (notable, it doesn't work with Rust itself, but that is large and has a very complex build system), and we think it is release quality. However there are certainly limitations and many planned improvements. It would be really useful if you could help us test the release candidate! Please report any crashes, or projects where the RLS gives no information or any bugs where it gives incorrect information.
  • Mozilla brings back Stylish Add-on to Firefox after it was Banned Last Year
    The Stylish add-on, with which you can give websites their very own style, is back for Firefox. This improvement has been welcomed by many users. The history of this Add-on is quite complicated as it was supposedly twice removed and added back before it was removed again. Now it has been added back as reported by Vess (@VessOnSecurity). [...] The add-on Stylish has been brought back in the Mozilla’s add-on storehouse. What users should know: This expansion was criticized some time prior as a user data collector and has been prohibited and banned a year back from Mozilla’s Add-on store. Owing to its notoriety of collecting data of users’ website visits in a way which makes it convenient to reveal users’ identity to third parties, Google and Mozilla banned it last year. It is indeed surprising as to why Mozilla decided to bring it back to its browser after it was criticized for compromising users’ identity.
  • LibreOffice 6.1: A week in stats
    On August 8, we announced LibreOffice 6.1, a new version of the suite with many great features and updates created by our worldwide community. Let’s look at some stats from the last week!
  • Graphos 0.7 released
    Graphos 0.7 has been released a couple of days ago!
  • Tesla open sources its security software, Hollywood goes open source, and more news
  • How Changa Bell is taking an ‘open source’ approach to grow the Black Male Yoga Intiative
  • As Academic Publishers Fight And Subvert Open Access, Preprints Offer An Alternative Approach For Sharing Knowledge Widely
    That's certainly true, but is easy to remedy. Academics who plan to publish a preprint could offer a copy of the paper to the group of trusted journalists under embargo -- just as they would with traditional papers. One sentence describing why it would be worth reading is all that is required by way of introduction. To the extent that the system works for today's published papers, it will also work for preprints. Some authors may publish without giving journalists time to check with other experts, but that's also true for current papers. Similarly, some journalists may hanker after full press releases that spoon-feed them the results, but if they can't be bothered working it out for themselves, or contacting the researchers and asking for an explanation, they probably wouldn't write a very good article anyway. The other concern relates to the quality of preprints. One of the key differences between a preprint and a paper published in a journal is that the latter usually goes through the process of "peer review", whereby fellow academics read and critique it. But it is widely agreed that the peer review process has serious flaws, as many have pointed out for years -- and as Sheldon himself admits. Indeed, as defenders note, preprints allow far more scrutiny to be applied than with traditional peer review, because they are open for all to read and spot mistakes. There are some new and interesting projects to formalize this kind of open review. Sheldon rightly has particular concerns about papers on public health matters, where lives might be put at risk by erroneous or misleading results. But major preprint sites like bioRxiv (for biology) and the upcoming medRxiv (for medicine and health sciences) are already trying to reduce that problem by actively screening preprints before they are posted.
  • MUMPS Masochism part I: Line and Block Scope

    It's sort of an open secret that I sometimes use ANSI M, better known as MUMPS. It was developed in the 60's, and it definitely still looks like something from the 60's. But it's 1,000 times uglier than anything from that decade. I've made plenty of people, from software testers at work to other developers on IRC, recoil in horror from showing them samples of even relatively mundane code like a simple "Hello, World!".

  • OpenSSH Username Enumeration
     

    We realized that without this patch, a remote attacker can easily test whether a certain user exists or not (username enumeration) on a target OpenSSH server

Microsoft Openwashing

  • Microsoft open sources new framework for Windows driver development [Ed: openwashing Microsoft Windows by pretending that when you write proprietary drivers for a proprietary O/S that does DRM, spies on users etc. you actually do something "open"]
  • Microsoft to Open Source Its Network Replication Software [Ed: Microsoft is openwashing some more of its entirely proprietary 'offerings', a hallmark of a company of liars. Come to us! The traps are free, the cages will be "open".]
  • GitHub goes off the Rails as Microsoft closes in [Ed: Microsoft will take GitHub off the rail like it did Skype and LinkedIn (totally lost)]
    GitHub's platform group is about 155 people at the moment and growing, said Lambert. And much of the group's focus is on breaking GitHub apart. GitHub is about a third of the way through an architectural change that began last year. The company is moving away from Ruby on Rails toward a more heterogeneous, composable infrastructure. Ruby still has a place at GitHub – Lambert referred to the company as a Ruby shop, but he said there's more Go, Java and even some Haskell being deployed for services. The goal, he explained, is to make GitHub's internal capabilities accessible to integrators and partners. "Our monolith is starting to break up and we're starting to abstract things into services," said Lambert. "The platform we've chosen to put them on is Kubernetes."

Android Leftovers

Benchmarks Of Btrfs RAID On Four Samsung 970 EVO NVMe SSDs

With the MSI MEG X399 CREATION that we received as part of the launch package for the Threadripper 2950X and Threadripper 2990WX it includes the XPANDER-AERO that provides 4-way M.2 NVMe SSD slots on a PCI Express x16 card. The XPANDER-AERO is actively cooled and could be passed off as a small form factor graphics card upon a very cursory examination. With this card I've been running tests on four Samsung 970 EVO NVMe SSDs in RAID to offer stellar Linux I/O performance. Here are some initial benchmarks using Btrfs. Read more