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Debian

SolydXK – A New Distro for Your Collection

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Debian

For a Linux user, every new distro is a whole new experience. For normal to advanced users, SolydXK is a great opportunity to use the most out of the computer. SolydXK is a distro based on Debian, the core of Ubuntu. It’s highly like that you’re using Ubuntu or other Ubuntu flavors. As SolydXK is based on Debian, you’ll feel nothing different with the functionalities and features different than Ubuntu. SolydXK also provides optimized Raspberry Pi version.

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Also: Debian Policy call for participation

Q4OS 3 "Centaurus" Linux OS Development Kicks Off Based on Debian 10 "Buster"

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Debian

Dubbed Centaurus, the Q4OS 3.1 series of the open-source distro is based on the upcoming Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" operating system, which currently lives in the Debian Testing repositories, and uses the development branch of the Trinity Desktop Environment (TDE), version 14.0.5.

"Q4OS Centaurus will be in development until Debian Buster becomes stable, and will be supported at least five years from the official release date," reads today's announcement. "Anybody is invited to try out the brand new version and report bugs and glitches."

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Review: siduction 2018.1.0

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Reviews
Debian

Running siduction was a pretty good experience for me. The distribution is very easy to set up and the Calamares installer gets the user up and running with fewer steps than Debian's system installer. The LXQt edition of siduction works quickly and the desktop environment is pleasantly lightweight. I found LXQt generally provided me with all the features I wanted to use while staying out of my way, which was appreciated.

One of the few concerns I had was with the confusing way video playing worked on the distribution. I think it would have been easier if siduction simply shipped with VLC or Totem for playing videos. Otherwise, the applications which shipped with the distribution worked well and I found running siduction was generally pleasantly boring.

For people who like running cutting edge software and want to take advantage of Debian's massive supply of open source software, I think siduction is an excellent option. The user needs to be prepared to handle a lot of updates, dozens or (in my case) maybe even hundreds per week. But if you don't mind installing waves of updates, then siduction offers good performance, an easy to use installer and a wide range of desktop editions. I especially appreciate the Synaptic feature which allows us to restart services which have been updated and I suspect people running network services will really like having this ability.

siduction didn't really do anything which stood out as different or amazing, but on the other hand I didn't run into any serious problems. The distribution provided a solid, easy to use rolling release with a huge amount of software in the repositories and handled all my hardware beautifully. I think people who like running openSUSE Tumbleweed or Arch Linux may want to check out siduction as an alternative, especially since the distribution can be set up with little more than a few mouse clicks.

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SolydXK Plasma Rewards Effort With Stunning Results

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Debian

SolydXK is a Debian-based Linux distribution that comes with a choice of the Xfce (SolydX) or KDE (SolydK) desktop. The latest edition of SolydXK, released this month, provides a state-of-the-art Linux platform.

When I first reviewed the SoldXK distro back in 2013, it was an impressive new kid on the Linux block. Schoelje, a key developer of two discontinued desktop options within the Linux Mint distro, has helped the SolydXK distro grow into a reputable Linux offering built around two popular computing options.

Those two desktop options drew me to the Linux OS years ago. Both have their strong points.

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Debian: Pune, Outreachy, Tails

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Debian
  • The Pune Metro 1st anniversary celebrations

    Yesterday’s interaction after seeing Mahametro’s interaction with the press, it seems the press or media seems to have a very poor understanding of the dynamics and not really interested in enriching citizen’s understanding of either the Pune Metro or the idea of Integrated Transport Initiative which has been in making for sometime now. Part of the issue also seem to lay with Pune Metro in not sharing knowledge as much as they can with the opportunities that digital media/space provides and at very low-cost.

  • Ideas for the project architecture and short term goals

    Creating a FOSS events calendar it is a big project that will most certainly continue beyond my Outreachy internship.

    Therefore, along with my mentors, we have established that my short term goal will be to contribute a bit to it by working on the MoinMoin EventCalendar so the events can be exported to the iCalendar format.

    I have been studying and playing around with the EventCalendar code and, so far, I've concluded that the best way to do this might be by writing a function to it. Just like there are other functions on this plugin to change the display of the calendar, there might be a function to just sort the data to the iCalendar format and to allow downloading the file.

  • Tails 3.5 released with Spectre-proof Linux kernel

    The privacy-oriented Linux distribution, Tails, has been updated with a new kernel to mitigate against Spectre. Tails 3.5 also comes with Tor Browser 7.5, a major upgrade in itself which includes some interface changes to make it more usable. There are also a plethora of smaller changes included in too.

Debian, Tails and PureOS

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Debian
  • apt-get install more contributors

    Every year I participate in a number of initiatives introducing people to free software and helping them make a first contribution. After all, making the first contribution to free software is a very significant milestone on the way to becoming a leader in the world of software engineering. Anything we can do to improve this experience and make it accessible to more people would appear to be vital to the continuation of our communities and the solutions we produce.

  • Improving communication

    I asked her about how she interacted with her mentors and how often, so I knew what I could ask for. She told me about her weekly meetings with her mentors and how she could chat direcly with them when she ran into some issues. And, indeed, I felt like things like that what I wanted to happen.

    Before I could reach out and discuss this with my mentors, though, Daniel himself read last week's post and brought up the idea of us speaking on the phone for the first time. That was indeed a good experience and I told him I would like to repeat or establish some sort of schedule to communicate with each other.

  • Go Anonymous With Tails 3.5 Linux Distro: Get Latest Version With Important Security Fixes

    Just earlier this month, the creators of Tails Linux distribution released their updated version that included the steps taken by Linux kernel devs to mitigate the Meltdown and Spectre vulnerabilities. Within one month, they’re here with a new and updated version with more security fixes.

  • Purism Begins Work On Unified Themes For Convergent PureOS Devices

    Last week Purism shared a progress update on the Librem 5 smartphone project where they outlined their plans to continue pursuing the i.MX8M SoC and other plans. They've kept up their word of delivering weekly status updates and out today is their latest summary of work.

    This week's update by Creative Director François Téchené covers their plans for a unified (and convergent) experience across the Purism devices running PureOS from the Librem 5 smartphone to their laptops.

Debian: gLinux, Insider Story, and Debian's Google Summer of Code 2018

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Debian
  • Google switches from Ubuntu to Debian as base for their in-house OS

    For years now Google has used Ubuntu as the base for their own private in-house OS, Goobuntu, to what they are now calling gLinux, which will be based off the unstable Debian-Testing branch for Debian 10 “Buster.”

    Using the testing branch of Debian does mean that the stability of the OS could be questioned, since Debian Stable is known as virtual unshakable, but Debian testing is almost the complete opposite at times.

  • It’s 2018, where’s my traditional New Year Plans post?

    My home server is still running Debian Jessie. I’m happy that it just works and my services are up, but I’m sad that I couldn’t find time for an upgrade to Debian stable (which is now Debian 9 Stretch) and maybe reinstall it with another config. I have lots of photos and videos to upload in my GNU MediaGoblin instances, but also couldn’t find time to do it (nor to print some of them, which was a plan for 2017, and the files still sleep in external harddrives or DVDs). So, this is a TODO item that crossed the year (yay! now I have almost 12 months ahead to try to complete it!). I’ll try to get this done before summer. I am considering installing my own pump.io instance but I’m not sure it’s good to place it in the same machine as the other services. We’ll see.

    [...]

    We still have servers running Debian Wheezy which is in LTS support until May. I’m confident that we’ll upgrade before Wheezy reaches end of life, but frankly looking at my work plan, I’m not sure when. Every month seems packed with other stuff. I’ve taken some weeks leave to attend my family and I have no clear mind about when and how do things. We’ll see.

  • Mentors and co-mentors for Debian's Google Summer of Code 2018

    Debian is applying as a mentoring organization for the Google Summer of Code 2018, an internship program open to university students aged 18 and up.

    Debian already has a wide range of projects listed but it is not too late to add more or to improve the existing proposals. Google will start reviewing the ideas page over the next two weeks and students will start looking at it in mid-February.

    Please join us and help extending Debian! You can consider listing a potential project for interns or listing your name as a possible co-mentor for one of the existing projects on Debian's Google Summer of Code wiki page.

Tails 3.5 Anonymous OS Released to Mitigate Spectre Vulnerability for AMD CPUs

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Security
Debian

Tails, the open-source Linux-based operating system designed to protect user's privacy while surfing the Internet, also known as Anonymous OS, was updated today to version 3.5.

Coming only two weeks after the Tails 3.4 release, which included patches for the Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities publicly disclosed earlier this month, today's Tails 3.5 update is here to bump the Linux kernel to version 4.14.13 and include the microcode firmware for AMD CPUs to mitigate the Spectre flaw.

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Debian Development Picks

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Development
Debian
  • PrimeZ270-p, Intel i7400 review and Debian – 1

    Before diving into installation, I had been reading for quite a while Matthew Garett’s work. Thankfully most of his blog posts do get mirrored on planet.debian.org hence it is easy to get some idea as what needs to be done although have told him (I think even shared here) that he should somehow make his site more easily navigable. Trying to find posts on either ‘GPT’ and ‘UEFI’ and to have those posts in an ascending or descending way date-wise is not possible, at least I couldn’t find a way to do it as he doesn’t do it date-wise or something.

  • Rblpapi 0.3.8: Strictly maintenance

    Another Rblpapi release, now at version 0.3.8, arrived on CRAN yesterday. Rblpapi provides a direct interface between R and the Bloomberg Terminal via the C++ API provided by Bloomberg Labs (but note that a valid Bloomberg license and installation is required).

  • FAI.me build service now supports backports

    Currently, the FAIme service offers images build with Debian stable, stable with backports and Debian testing.

Debian and Ubuntu: TLCockpit, Google, ROS and Ubuntu Core

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • TLCockpit v0.8

    Today I released v0.8 of TLCockpit, the GUI front-end for the TeX Live Manager tlmgr. I spent the winter holidays in updating and polishing, but also in helping me debug problems that users have reported. Hopefully the new version works better for all.

  • Google's Linux workstations are switching from Ubuntu to Debian

    Like many companies, Google uses a variety of operating systems in-house. macOS and Windows are used by a large number of employees, a modified build of Debian Linux is used on its servers (as of 2014, at least), and Chrome OS and Android devices are commonplace. In work environments where Linux is needed, Google uses a customized version of Ubuntu 14.04 called 'Goobuntu,' which has never been released publicly.

  • Your first robot: Introduction to the Robot Operating System [2/5]

    This is the second blog post in this series about creating your first robot with ROS and Ubuntu Core. In the previous post we walked through all the hardware necessary to follow this series, and introduced Ubuntu Core, the operating system for IoT devices. We installed it on our Raspberry Pi, and used it to go through the CamJam worksheets. In this post, I’m going to introduce you to the Robot Operating System (ROS), and we’ll use it to move our robot.

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GitLab Web IDE

  • GitLab Web IDE Goes GA and Open-Source in GitLab 10.7
    GitLab Web IDE, aimed to simplify the workflow of accepting merge requests, is generally available in GitLab 10.7, along with other features aimed to improve C++ and Go code security and improve Kubernets integration. The GitLab Web IDE was initially released as a beta in GitLab 10.4 Ultimate with the goal of streamlining the workflow to contribute small fixes and to resolve merge requests without requiring the developer to stash their changes and switch to a new branch locally, then back. This could be of particular interest to developers who have a significant number of PRs to review, as well as to developers starting their journey with Git.
  • GitLab open sources its Web IDE
    GitLab has announced its Web IDE is now generally available and open sourced as part of the GitLab 10.7 release. The Web IDE was first introduced in GitLab Ultimate 10.4. It is designed to enable developers to change multiple files, preview Markdown, review changes and commit directly within a browser. “At GitLab, we want everyone to be able to contribute, whether you are working on your first commit and getting familiar with git, or an experienced developer reviewing a stack of changes. Setting up a local development environment, or needing to stash changes and switch branches locally, can add friction to the development process,” Joshua Lambert, senior product manager of monitoring and distribution at GitLab, wrote in a post.

Record Terminal Activity For Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Server

At times system administrators and developers need to use many, complex and lengthy commands in order to perform a critical task. Most of the users will copy those commands and output generated by those respective commands in a text file for review or future reference. Of course, “history” feature of the shell will help you in getting the list of commands used in the past but it won’t help in getting the output generated for those commands. Read
more

Linux Kernel Maintainer Statistics

As part of preparing my last two talks at LCA on the kernel community, “Burning Down the Castle” and “Maintainers Don’t Scale”, I have looked into how the Kernel’s maintainer structure can be measured. One very interesting approach is looking at the pull request flows, for example done in the LWN article “How 4.4’s patches got to the mainline”. Note that in the linux kernel process, pull requests are only used to submit development from entire subsystems, not individual contributions. What I’m trying to work out here isn’t so much the overall patch flow, but focusing on how maintainers work, and how that’s different in different subsystems. Read more

Security: Updates, Trustjacking, Breach Detection

  • Security updates for Monday
  • iOS Trustjacking – A Dangerous New iOS Vulnerability
    An iPhone user's worst nightmare is to have someone gain persistent control over his/her device, including the ability to record and control all activity without even needing to be in the same room. In this blog post, we present a new vulnerability called “Trustjacking”, which allows an attacker to do exactly that. This vulnerability exploits an iOS feature called iTunes Wi-Fi sync, which allows a user to manage their iOS device without physically connecting it to their computer. A single tap by the iOS device owner when the two are connected to the same network allows an attacker to gain permanent control over the device. In addition, we will walk through past related vulnerabilities and show the changes that Apple has made in order to mitigate them, and why these are not enough to prevent similar attacks.
  • What Is ‘Trustjacking’? How This New iOS Vulnerability Allows Remote Hacking?
    This new vulnerability called trustjacking exploits a convenient WiFi feature, which allows iOS device owners to manage their devices and access data, even when they are not in the same location anymore.
  • Breach detection with Linux filesystem forensics
    Forensic analysis of a Linux disk image is often part of incident response to determine if a breach has occurred. Linux forensics is a different and fascinating world compared to Microsoft Windows forensics. In this article, I will analyze a disk image from a potentially compromised Linux system in order to determine the who, what, when, where, why, and how of the incident and create event and filesystem timelines. Finally, I will extract artifacts of interest from the disk image. In this tutorial, we will use some new tools and some old tools in creative, new ways to perform a forensic analysis of a disk image.