Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Debian

Debian: DebConf17, DebCamp and More

Filed under
Debian

DebConf17 Reports

Filed under
Debian
  • Why TUF does not shine (for APT repositories)

    In DebConf17 there was a talk about The Update Framework, short TUF. TUF claims to be a plug-in solution to software updates, but while it has the same practical level of security as apt, it also has the same shortcomings, including no way to effectively revoke keys.

    TUF divides signing responsibilities into roles: A root role, a targets rule (signing stuff to download), a snapshots rule (signing meta data), and a time stamp rule (signing a time stamp file). There also is a mirror role for signing a list of mirrors, but we can ignore that for now. It strongly recommends that all keys except for timestamp and mirrors are kept offline, which is not applicable for APT repositories – Ubuntu updates the repository every 30 minutes, imagine doing that with offline keys. An insane proposal.

  • I went all the way to Montréal for DebConf17, and all I got was a new MUA

    On Sunday night I got back from Montréal, where I attended both DebCamp17 and DebConf17. It was a wonderful two weeks. All I really did was work on Debian for roughly eight hours per day, interspersed with getting to know both people I’ve been working with since I first began contributing to Debian in late 2015, and people I didn’t yet know. But this was all I really needed to be doing. There was no need to engage in distracting myself.

    I enjoyed the first week more. There were sufficiently few people present that you could know at least all of their faces, and interesting-sounding talks didn’t interrupt making progress on one’s own work or unblocking other people’s work. In the second week it was great to meet people who were only present for the second week, but it felt more like regular Debian, in that I was often waiting on other people or they were waiting on me.

Debian GNU/Linux Running On Mobile Devices Like PocketCHIP, Samsung Galaxy, ZeroPhone, & Pyra

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

Debian is also called the universal operating system as it is used as a base for hundreds of Linux distributions. So, this claim also underlines that Debian should run on mobile devices too–right? Well, Debian developers are continuously working to add support for new devices and adapt it as per hardware and GUI capabilities of different devices.

Read more

Looks Like Debian GNU/Linux Runs on Quite a Few Mobile Devices, Including Pyra

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

Debian Project's W. Martin Borgert reports today that work on making the famous and widely-used Debian GNU/Linux operating system run on various mobile devices continues these days.

Read more

Debian and Derivatives: Debian on Devices and Raspbian OS

Filed under
Debian
  • Looks Like Debian GNU/Linux Runs on Quite a Few Mobile Devices, Including Pyra

    Debian Project's W. Martin Borgert reports today that work on making the famous and widely-used Debian GNU/Linux operating system run on various mobile devices continues these days.

    During the DebConf17 Debian Conference event that took place from August 6 to August 12, 2017, in Montréal, Canada, more than 50 Debian contributors and developers gathered to discuss the future of the open source operating system on mobile devices, such as smartphones, tablets, and even handheld computers.

    "Work on Debian for mobile devices, i.e. telephones, tablets, and handheld computers, continues. During the recent DebConf17 in Montréal, Canada, more than 50 people had a meeting to reconsider opportunities and challenges for Debian on mobile devices," said W. Martin Borgert in a blog post published earlier today.

  • Work on Debian for mobile devices continues

    Work on Debian for mobile devices, i.e. telephones, tablets, and handheld computers, continues. During the recent DebConf17 in Montréal, Canada, more than 50 people had a meeting to reconsider opportunities and challenges for Debian on mobile devices.

  • Raspberry Pi OS refresh: Raspbian's update to Debian Stretch is out now

    On the heels of the Debian 9 Stretch release, Raspberry Pi's Debian-based Raspbian OS has been updated and is now available for download.

Raspbian Linux OS for Raspberry Pi Is Now Based on Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch"

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

As of Wednesday, August 16, 2017, the Raspberry Pi Foundation has released new installation images of its Debian-based Raspbian Linux operating system rebased on Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" series.

Read more

Debian and Ubuntu Development

Filed under
Development
Debian
Ubuntu
  • My Debian & Ubuntu work from April to mid-August 2017

    Okay, so I have been slack with my blogging again. I have been travelling around Europe with work quite a bit, had a short holiday over Easter in Denmark, and also had 3 weeks of Summer Holiday in Germany.

  • Debian turns 24!

    Today is Debian's 24th anniversary. If you are close to any of the cities celebrating Debian Day 2017, you're very welcome to join the party!

    If not, there's still time for you to organize a little celebration or contribution to Debian. For example, spread the word about Debian Day with this nice piece of artwork created by Debian Developer Daniel Lenharo de Souza and Valessio Brito, taking inspiration from the desktop themes Lines and softWaves by Juliette Belin:

  • Ubuntu Foundations Development Summary – August 16, 2017

    This newsletter is to provide a status update from the Ubuntu Foundations Team. There will also be highlights provided for any interesting subjects the team may be working on. If you would like to reach the Foundations team, you can find us at the #ubuntu-devel channel on freenode.

  • Ubuntu's new desktop will have an always-visible dock

    Canonical, the makers of the Ubuntu Linux distribution, has started to release details of the upcoming desktop environment shift in Ubuntu 17.10. Months after the decision to drop its own Unity desktop was announced, the new GNOME look is taking shape.

Debian Celebrates Its 24th Birthday

Filed under
Debian

Yesterday marked GNOME turning 20 while today Debian developers and users have its 24th birthday of the project to celebrate.

It was this day in 1993 that the late Ian Murdock founded the Debian Project. It's on 16 August each year that the birthday is celebrated, also known as Debian Day or Debian Appreciation Day by its creators and fans.

Read more

GNOME and Debian: Debian Turning 24, GNOME Turning 20

Filed under
GNOME
Debian
  • Debian Celebrates Its 24th Birthday

    Yesterday marked GNOME turning 20 while today Debian developers and users have its 24th birthday of the project to celebrate.

  • GNOME desktop environment for Linux and BSD is 20 years old today

    When many people think of Linux, they incorrectly assume it is an operating system. Actually, Linux is merely the kernel which many operating systems leverage. An actual operating system is compromised of many things, including a user interface -- after all, users need to interface with their computer!

    Most computer users will obviously want a graphical UI nowadays, and for BSD and Linux-based operating systems there are many such desktop environments from which to choose. One of the most popular environments is GNOME. Not only is GNOME a DE, but it has evolved into much more, such as a collection of apps and design rules (Human Interface Guidelines). Today, GNOME is celebrating a very important milestone -- it is an impressive 20 years old!

  • Happy birthday, GNOME!

    The GNOME desktop turns 20 today, and I'm so excited! Twenty years is a major milestone for any open source software project, especially a graphical desktop environment like GNOME that has to appeal to many different users. The 20th anniversary is definitely something to celebrate!

  • Linux desktop GUI GNOME celebrates its 20th birthday

    By 1997, there had long been graphical Unix and Linux graphical user interface (GUI) desktops, but none of them had gathered much support. KDE, which was destined to become a major desktop, had started in 1996, but it was still facing opposition for its use of the Qt license. The GNOME Project, founded by Miguel de Icaza and Federico Mena Quintero on August 15, 1997, was created to build a GUI without the use of any non-General Public License (GPL) software. Thus, a struggle began between the two Linux desktops, which continues to this day.

Debian: Debconf17 and Reproducible Builds

Filed under
Debian
  • Consensually doing things together?

    I’d like to explore what motivates one to start a project and what motivates one to keep maintaining it. What are the energy levels required to manage bits of Debian as the project keeps growing. How easy it is to say no. Whether we have roles in Debian that require irreplaceable heroes to keep them going. What could be done to make life easier for heroes, easy enough that mere mortals can help, or take their place.

  • @DebConf17: Ad-hoc BoF: Debian for the Remote Desktop

    On Thursday at DebConf17, all people interested in using this or that Remote Desktop solution on Debian (as a server, as a client, as both) came together for a BoF.

  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #119

    29 package reviews have been added, 72 have been updated and 151 have been removed in this week, adding to our knowledge about identified issues.

  • "packages should build reproducibly" - after 4 years this work of many is in debian-policy now

    Four years ago Lunar held a BoF at DebConf13 which started the initiative in Debian. I only got involved in September 2014 with setting up continuous tests, rebuilding each package twice with some variations and then comparing the results using diffoscope, which back then was still called debbindiff and which we renamed as part of our efforts to make Reproducible Builds the norm in Free Software.

  • Debconf17

    I gave a talk entitled “Patterns for Testing Debian Packages”, in which I presented a collection of 7 patterns I documented while pushing the Debian Continuous Integration project, and were published in a 2016 paper. Video recording and a copy of the slides are available.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

FreeNAS, World’s Most Popular Storage OS, Gets AMD Ryzen Support, Cloud Sync

Coming six months after the release of the FreeNAS 11 stable series, the FreeNAS 11.1 update is based on FreeBSD 11.1 and introduces cloud integration, support for AMD Ryzen and Intel Xeon Scalable family of processors, OpenZFS performance improvements, as well as preliminary support for Docker application container engine through a virtual machine built from RancherOS. "FreeNAS 11.1 adds a cloud sync (data import/export to the cloud) feature," reads the announcement. "This new feature lets you sync (similar to backup), move (erase from source), or copy (only changed data) data to and from public cloud providers that include Amazon S3 (Simple Storage Services), Backblaze B2 Cloud, Google Cloud, and Microsoft Azure." Read more

Amazon Linux 2 Benchmarks, 6-Way Linux OS EC2 Compute Cloud Comparison

With Amazon AWS this week having released Amazon Linux 2 LTS I was excited to put this updated cloud-focused operating system through some performance tests to see how it stacks up with the more well known Linux distributions. Read more

Open Source “PiTalk” Turns Your Raspberry Pi Minicomputer Into A Modular Smartphone

More than a year ago, I wrote about a Raspberry Pi-powered phone called PiPhone, and the readers loved it. Just recently, I came across another similar project on Kickstarter and decided to share it on Fossbytes. Named PiTalk, the project calls itself the “first ever DIY modular smartphone.” Powered by Python, PiTalk modular smartphone is compatible with Raspberry Pi Zero, Pi 2, and Pi 3. For voice and data communication, it has a 3G module. The basic features performed by PiTalk are: Read more

antiX MX-17 Linux OS Brings Latest Debian GNU/Linux 9.3 "Stretch" Updates

Powered by Linux kernel 4.13 and using Xfce 4.12.3 as default desktop environment, antiX MX-17 comes six months after the antiX MX-16 release and promises to bring all the latest security patches and software update from the software repositories of the recently released Debian GNU/Linux 9.3 "Stretch" operating system. The MX variant ships with all the antiX live features, including persistence up to 20GB, and automatic selection of appropriate drivers for most Broadcom wireless chipsets with minimal user intervention. Being targeted at low-end computers, antiX MX-17 offers a 32-bit PAE kernel for machines with less than 4GB RAM. Read more