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WordPress 4.9.1

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  • WordPress hit with keylogger, 5,400 sites infected
  • WORDPRESS 4.9.1

    After a much longer than expected break due to moving and the resulting lack of Internet, plus WordPress releasing a package with a non-free file, the Debian package for WordPress 4.9.1 has been uploaded!

    WordPress 4.9 has a number of improvements, especially around the customiser components so that looked pretty slick. The editor for the customiser now has a series of linters what will warn if you write something bad, which is a very good thing! Unfortunately the Javascript linter is jshint which uses a non-free license which that team is attempting to fix.  I have also reported the problem to WordPress upstream to have a look at.

Debian 9.3 and Debian 8.10 released

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  • Updated Debian 9: 9.3 released

    The Debian project is pleased to announce the third update of its stable distribution Debian 9 (codename "stretch"). This point release mainly adds corrections for security issues, along with a few adjustments for serious problems. Security advisories have already been published separately and are referenced where available.

    Please note that the point release does not constitute a new version of Debian 9 but only updates some of the packages included. There is no need to throw away old "stretch" media. After installation, packages can be upgraded to the current versions using an up-to-date Debian mirror.

  • Updated Debian 8: 8.10 released

    The Debian project is pleased to announce the tenth update of its oldstable distribution Debian 8 (codename "jessie"). This point release mainly adds corrections for security issues, along with a few adjustments for serious problems. Security advisories have already been published separately and are referenced where available.

    Please note that the point release does not constitute a new version of Debian 8 but only updates some of the packages included. There is no need to throw away old "jessie" media. After installation, packages can be upgraded to the current versions using an up-to-date Debian mirror.

  • Debian GNU/Linux 9.3 "Stretch" and 8.10 "Jessie" Have Been Officially Announced

    The Debian Project announced this morning the general availability of the Debian GNU/Linux 9.3 and Debian GNU/Linux 8.10 point releases of the Stretch and Jessie series.

    While Debian GNU/Linux 9.3 is the third maintenance update to the Stretch series, the latest stable release of the operating system, Debian GNU/Linux 8.10 represents the tenth point release of the Jessie branch, which is the oldstable distribution of Debian since the release of Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch." Both include the latest security updates published through the official repositories.

Debian 10-Based Distro DebEX KDE Plasma Now Uses Latest Calamares Installer

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GNU/Linux developer Arne Exton released a new build of his Debian-based DebEX KDE Plasma distribution that updates the graphical installer to latest Calamares universal installer framework release.

Coming one and a half months after the previous build, DebEX KDE Build 171203 incorporates all the latest package updates from the upstream Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" (Debian Testing) and Debian Sid (Debian Unstable) repositories, and updates the KDE components to KDE Development Platform 4.16.0 LTS and KDE Plasma 5:37 as default desktop environment.

It also ships with the Linux 4.13.4 kernel compiled by the developer with extra hardware support, but the biggest change, however, is the replacement of the Refracta Installer with the recently released Calamares 3.1.9 universal installer framework for GNU/Linux distributions, which lets users choose their preferred language when the installation starts.

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Debian 10 "Buster" Will Ensure Automatic Installation of Security Upgrades

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The Debian Installer Buster Alpha 2 release comes with a few important changes, such as the addition of the unattended-upgrades package by default through the pkgsel component to ensure the automatic installation of security upgrades, as well as the addition of the installation images for the mips64el architecture.

Another important change in this second alpha release of the Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" Installer is that the Linux 4.13 kernel series is now supported for new installations, though you should know it reached end of life last month, so we believe the third alpha of Debian Installer will support Linux kernel 4.14 LTS.

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Debian Installer Buster Alpha 2

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  • Debian Installer Buster Alpha 2 release

    The Debian Installer team[1] is pleased to announce the second alpha release of the installer for Debian 10 "Buster".

  • Debian Installer Buster Alpha 2 Released

    The Debian project has issued the second alpha release of the Debian Installer that eventually will be used by Debian 10.0 "Buster".

    Debian Installer Buster Alpha 2 was released today, three months after the initial installer alpha.

    The unattended-upgrades package is now installed by default for trying to ensure the automatic installation of security upgrades. The installer image now also makes use of the Linux 4.13 kernel, support for EXT4's 64-bit feature in syslinux, new machine DB entries for some ARM boards, and various other updates.

Slax Linux – A Modern, Portable and Fast Linux Operating System

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Today’s OS review is on a somewhat mini version of Slackware OS – a LiveCD OS that can be run directly from a USB stick, CD drive, or even RAM, without needing to install it on your PC’s hard drive.

First, let’s begin with the facts.

Slax is small Live Debian-based Linux distro that can be regarded as the Minimalist’s OS. It is Live because you can run it right from a USB stick and it works with a plethora of filesystems including NTFS, FAT, EXT (ext2,ext3,ext4), and btrfs.

It was developed by Tomas Matejicek from the Czech Republic with a Monolithic kernel type to be fully customizable using Slackware packages and Slax modules – which, of course, are also open-source.

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More Debian:

  • Announcing

    We're happy to announce that Debsources, the Web application that
    allows to browse and search the entire source code of all Debian
    releases, is now hosted on the official Debian infrastructure and
    available at

  • Sources.Debian.Org Launches To Provide Easy Access To Debian Source Code

    For those wanting to easily browse the source-code to all Debian packages, it can now be trivially done so from your hardware.

    DebSources is a platform for viewing the Debian source-code via the web in searchable form and for all Debian releases. Previously DebSources was deployed to unofficial Debian infrastructure, while now it's made official and running on hardware.

Raspberry Pi: Hands on with Raspbian Stretch plus Debian Stretch Pi desktop for PC and Mac

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The Raspberry Pi Foundation has released a new version of the Raspbian GNU/Linux operating system, based on the latest Debian GNU/Linux (Stretch), for all models of Raspberry Pi and for PC and Mac systems.

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Debian, Ubuntu, and Mint

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  • Debian LTS work, November 2017

    I was assigned 13 hours of work by Freexian's Debian LTS initiative and carried over 14 hours from September. I worked all 17 hours.

  • Mini-DebConf Cambridge 2017

    Last week I attended Cambridge's annual mini-DebConf. It's slightly strange to visit a place one has lived in for a long time but which is no longer home. I joined Nattie in the 'video team house' which was rented for the whole week; I only went for four days.

  • Ubuntu Desktop Weekly Update: December 1, 2017

    GNOME Disk Utility If you have snaps installed and open the Disks utility, your snaps appear as loop devices. We found this to be confusing and a bit messy, so we have proposed a fix upstream and this should be merged soon.

  • Ubuntu Podcast: S10E39 – Hysterical Daffy Furniture
  • Ubuntu 17.10 Brings Back GNOME Desktop Environment

    Ubuntu is one of the most popular Debian-based Linux distributions, and it’s undergone a lot of changes. Most recently, Canonical, the developer collective behind Ubuntu, switched from the GNOME desktop environment to an in-house alternative called Unity. But the most recent version of Ubuntu, 17.10, brings back GNOME 3.26.

    With GNOME comes GDM (GNOME Display Manager), a tweakable settings menu that replaces Unity’s LightDM. GNOME’s ecosystem makes it arguably easier to customize than the latter — unlike previous versions of Ubuntu, for example, you can change the location of the Windows control buttons (minimise, fullscreen and close) in just a few button presses.

  • Linux Mint 18.3 'Sylvia' KDE and Xfce betas available for download, but don't bother

    Linux Mint is a great operating system that I recommend highly. It is based on the rock-solid Ubuntu 16.04, meaning it is stable and compatible with many packages. For Windows converts in particular, Linux Mint with the Cinnamon desktop environment can be a very inviting first-time distribution that should offer a positive experience. The Mate DE variant is a solid choice too -- if your hardware is a bit anemic, that is.

Debian Development Updates

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First Raspberry Pi Desktop Release Based on Debian Stretch Is Out for PCs & Macs

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The company kicked off the month of December with a big announcement today, announcing that they've managed to rebase the Raspberry Pi Desktop OS for PCs and Macs on the latest stable Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system, as well as to release a new version of the Raspbian Stretch distro for Raspberry Pi.

"Today, we are launching the first Debian Stretch release of the Raspberry Pi Desktop for PCs and Macs," said Simon Long, UX engineer at Raspberry Pi Foundation. "We’re also pleased to announce that we are releasing the latest version of Raspbian Stretch for your Pi today."

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More in Tux Machines

How to build something ‘useful’ with a Raspberry Pi

In honor of Pi Day, Chaim Gartenberg and I cooked up a tiny little Raspberry Pi project for yesterday’s episode of Circuit Breaker Live. We started with a simple concept: a button that says “Why?” when you press it, in honor of our favorite podcast. So we knew we’d need a button, some sound files, a little bit of Python code, and, of course, a Raspberry Pi. A new Pi is $35, but we found an old Raspberry Pi 2 in my desk drawer, which was up to the task. (Newer Pis have built-in Wi-Fi and faster processors, but for our simple button project we didn’t need internet or extra horsepower.) Read more

Wine 3.4

  • Wine Announcement
    The Wine development release 3.4 is now available.
  • Wine 3.4 Release Continues With Vulkan Upbringing, Some Wine-Staging Patches
    The latest bi-weekly release of Wine is now available for running your favorite or necessary Windows programs/games on Linux and macOS. Wine 3.4 is this latest release and it's significant for continuing to land the "WineVulkan" code. This does include the latest Wine Vulkan patches as of yesterday including the first bits of apps/games working and integration with the X11 driver.

Graphics: AMDGPU, Mesa 17.3.7, RADV

  • Linux 4.17 To Enable AMDGPU DC By Default For All Supported GPUs
    Since the introduction of the AMDGPU DC display code (formerly known as DAL) in Linux 4.15, this modern display stack has just been enabled by default for newer Radeon Vega and Raven Ridge devices. With Linux 4.17 that is changing with AMDGPU DC being enabled by default across the board for supported GPUs. Building off the earlier DRM-Next material for Linux 4.17, Alex Deucher minutes ago sent in another round of feature updates for targeting this next kernel cycle. This latest batch has continued code refactoring around PowerPlay, support for fetching the video RAM type from the video BIOS, allowing the TTM memory manager to drop its backing store when not needed, DC bandwidth calculation updates, enabling DC backlight control for pre-DCE11 GPUs, various display code fixes, and other bug fixes.
  • AMDGPU / ATI 18.0.1 X.Org DDX Driver Releases, Fixes Infinite Loop & Crashes
    Michel Dänzer of AMD issued bug-fix updates on Thursday for the xf86-video-ati and xf86-video-amdgpu DDX drivers. Just two weeks after the AMDGPU 18.0 X.Org driver release as the first version under their new year-based versioning scheme, the 18.0.1 bug-fix release is out. The xf86-video-amdgpu 18.0.1 DDX update fixes a potential infinite loop after a xorg-server reset in some configurations, Xorg crashing when multiple primary screens are configured, and using the TearFree feature could trigger Pixman library debugging spew.
  • Mesa 17.3.7 Nearing Release With 50+ Changes
    While waiting for Mesa 18.0, the Mesa 17.3.7 point release will soon hit stable users of this open-source, user-space graphics stack.
  • RADV Patches Are Closer For Sub-Group Capabilities
    Daniel Schürmann continues hacking on the sub-group patch-set for the RADV Vulkan driver to expose this important feature of the recent Vulkan 1.1 release.

Server: Containers, Kubernetes, Varnish 6.0, HHVM 3.25.0, 3.24.4, and 3.21.8

  • Container Isolation Gone Wrong
    One of the main advantages of embracing containers is "lightweight virtualization." Since each container is just a thin layer around the containerized processes, the user gains enormous efficiencies, for example by increasing the container density per host, or by spinning containers up and down at a very fast pace. However, as the troubleshooting story in the article will show, this lightweight virtualization comes at the cost of sharing the underlying kernel among all containers, and in some circumstances, this can lead to surprising and undesirable effects that container users typically don't think about. This troubleshooting tale is rather involved. I've started from the basics and worked up to the more complex material in the hope that readers at all levels can get value out of it.
  • Introducing Agones: Open-source, multiplayer, dedicated game-server hosting built on Kubernetes
    In the world of distributed systems, hosting and scaling dedicated game servers for online, multiplayer games presents some unique challenges. And while the game development industry has created a myriad of proprietary solutions, Kubernetes has emerged as the de facto open-source, common standard for building complex workloads and distributed systems across multiple clouds and bare metal servers. So today, we’re excited to announce Agones (Greek for "contest" or "gathering"), a new open-source project that uses Kubernetes to host and scale dedicated game servers.
  • Varnish 6.0 Released
    It's that time of March again, and Varnish 6.0.0 is here.
  • HHVM 3.25.0, 3.24.4, and 3.21.8
    HHVM 3.25 is released! This release contains new features, bug fixes, performance improvements, and supporting work for future improvements. Packages have been published in the usual places.
  • HHVM 3.25 Released, Now Defaults To PHP7 Mode
    Facebook developers working on the HHVM Hack/PHP language stack have released version 3.25 of the HipHop Virtual Machine. HHVM 3.25's PHP support now defaults to PHP7 rather than the PHP5 mode, which is now in an unsupported state. As expressed previously, Facebook will be focusing more on their Hack language support than PHP7 thanks to all the upstream improvements with PHP 7 especially on the performance front. But the large compatibility with PHP7 will happen to continue at least for the time being. With HHVM 3.25 includes support for PHP7 Throwable/Error/Exception hierarchy, changes to visibility modifiers, and other compatibility work.