Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Debian

Debian Developers at FOSDEM and University of Lincoln (Debian Project Leader for 2 Years)

Filed under
Debian
  • Jonathan Dowland: FOSDEM 2020 timetable

    This coming week is FOSDEM! If you're like me and find schedule planning easier with paper and highlighters, this might be useful.

    FOSDEM provide a (30 page) schedule PDF for printing, but the printing order doesn't clearly show which tracks are in parallel.

  • Steve McIntyre: Presenting guest lectures at the University of Lincoln, January 2020

    Dr Charles Fox from the University of Lincoln contacted me out of the blue back in September. He asked me if I would give a couple of guest lectures to his Computer Science students. I was deeply flattered! I took him up on his invitation, and on Tuesday 28th Jan I headed up to visit him and the TSE students.

    My first talk was to provide background on Free and Open Source Software. I started with the history of software in the 1950s, working forwards through the events that sparked the FLOSS movement. I spoke about the philosophical similarities and differences between Free Software and Open Source, and how FLOSS has grown to a state of near-ubiquity. Several of the students are already involved in some existing FLOSS projects, so I was clearly preaching to the choir! I hope I managed to interest the rest of the audience too; I certainly had a warm welcome!

Mollamby: the Debian Developer certificate

Filed under
Development
Debian

In March 2018, the script for generating Debian Developer certificates was updated to create certificates for non-uploading Debian Developers.

We can see that in the logs of the Debian keyring, the Debian Project Leader's girlfriend, Molly de Blanc, was added to the Debian Developer non-uploading keyring in December 2018.

In April 2019, Miss de Blanc started a new job at GNOME Foundation.

If you assume she had to give her previous employer, the FSF, one or two months notice, then she probably received the GNOME job offer in January or February. Take another step backwards and it appears she was in the process of making job applications in December 2018.

It appears that the DPL's girlfriend was promoted and given that holy DD status at the very time she was looking for a job.

[...]

Ironically, McGovern's email accuses the person asking the question of being divisive. Yet just weeks later, Neil McGovern played a key role in one of the most divisive events in the entire history of free software, ambushing de Blanc's former boss, Richard Stallman, using his GNOME title to add weight to an anti-RMS attack blog.

Read more

Raspberry Pi 4 Benchmarked with 32-bit and 64-bit Debian OS

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Debian

The first Raspberry Pi board with a 64-bit Arm processor was Raspberry Pi 3 Model B, and all new models including the latest Raspberry Pi 4 come with four Arm Cortex-A 64-bit cores.

But in order to keep backward software compatibility with the original Raspberry Pi and Raspberry Pi 2, the Raspberry Pi foundation decided to keep provided 32-bit OS image, so nearly everybody is now running a 32-bit OS on 64-bit hardware, and Eben Upton famously claimed it did not matter.

We already wrote that 64-bit Arm (Aarch64) boosted performance by 15 to 30% against 32-bit Arm (Aarch32) several years ago, but Matteo Croce decided to try it out himself on Raspberry Pi 4 board first running benchmarks on Raspbian 32-bit before switching to a lightweight version of Debian compiled as aarch64.

Read more

Asus launches Coral-based Tinker Edge T SBC for $168

Filed under
Linux
Debian

Asus has launched a $168 “Tinker Edge T” SBC that runs Linux on the same Coral SOM module found on Google’s Coral Dev Board, equipped with an i.MX8M and an Edge TPU. The SBC advances to 3x USB 3.2 ports and offers a second CSI port and a 12-19V input.

Asus has begun selling its Tinker Edge T SBC after previewing the board along with a similar CR1S-CM-A industrial board and RK3399Pro based Tinker Edge R SBC back at Computex in late May. The Tinker Edge T variant of Google’s $150 Coral Dev Board has a similar, Raspberry Pi like layout and uses the same Coral SOM, which combines a quad-core NXP i.MX8M with Google’s Edge TPU AI chip.

Read more

DebConf20: offer to speak in Palestine censored

Filed under
Debian

On 20 December 2019, a Debian Developer posted the message below to the debian-project mailing list, offering to give the same talk at both DebConf20 in Haifa, Israel and again in Palestine.

The message never appeared in the list and can't be found in the list archive for December.

Alexander Wirt (formorer) has previously declared that he will censor messages about Israel due to anti-semitism. Yet the message below doesn't include anything against Israel and doesn't mention the boycott campaign. It is simply a volunteer offering to give up more of his time to help a population in Palestine who suffer from extraordinary discrimination.

Is Wirt really fighting anti-semitism, or could the DebConf20 organizers simply be afraid of any discussion that may deter wealthy Israeli sponsors?

Read more

New Debian Developers and Maintainers (November and December 2019)

Filed under
Debian

The following contributors got their Debian Developer accounts in the last two months:

Louis-Philippe Véronneau (pollo)
Olek Wojnar (olek)
Sven Eckelmann (ecsv)
Utkarsh Gupta (utkarsh)
Robert Haist (rha)

The following contributors were added as Debian Maintainers in the last two months:

Denis Danilov
Joachim Falk
Thomas Perret
Richard Laager

Congratulations!

Read more

EasyOS version 2.2.5 released

Filed under
Debian

The previous official release was 2.2. What is new is mostly work on the infrastructure.

This includes hardware-profiling for video and sound, to automatically handle booting of a USB-stick on different computers, or plugging in different cards on the same computer.

There has also been a lot of work on Bluetooth, in particular to support sound, such as Bluetooth speakers and earbuds.

Read more

Debian Policy Updated Following Recent Systemd "Init System Diversity" Vote

Filed under
Debian

Following last month's Debian init system diversity vote where the Debian developers decided on a general resolution of focusing on systemd but support exploring alternatives, the official Debian Policy has been updated to reflect that.

Debian Policy 4.5 is the new version that incorporates guidance following that general resolution.

The Debian Policy manual now states that packages with system services should include systemd service units, init scripts are encouraged if there is no systemd unit but optional otherwise, init scripts are encouraged to support the "status" argument, and use of update-rc.d is required if the package includes an init script.

Read more

Debian: Stremio in Sparky Linux, Looking at Debian 10, and Package Usage Stats

Filed under
Debian
  • Stremio

    There is a new tool available for Sparkers: Stremio

    What is Stremio?

    Stremio is a one-stop hub for video content aggregation. Discover, organize and watch video from all kind of sources on any device that you own.
    Movies, TV shows, series, live television or web channels like YouTube and Twitch.tv – you can find all this on Stremio.

  • Debian 10, the clean install

    Events have ended my upgrade procrastination. Last week my hard drive started having many errors. Fortunately it lasted long enough for me to copy all of its contents to my USB backup drive. (My /home/brad directory is automatically backed up daily, but I also have separate partitions for downloaded files, PDFs, Linux CD images, and archived photos from my digital camera...and those only get backed up now and then.) Then a quick trip to the store for a new SATA hard drive.

    I suppose I could have copied my old root partition over to the new drive. But I've been running 32-bit Debian 8 ("Jessie"), which is now two versions behind. And I've been noticing more and more applications that I want to run are only being distributed for 64-bit Linux. So I decided to do a clean install of 64-bit Debian 10 ("Buster"), with my preferred MATE desktop (now a standard option with Debian).

  • gnu Linux Debian – top 1000 packages by install – popularity contest

    remember: only the installs are counted where the user said yes during setup to: „do you want to participate in popularity contest?“ (guess that many Linux users are privacy sensitive and a lot of them probably say „no“)

Debian Is Making The Process Easier To Bisect Itself Using Their Wayback Machine

Filed under
Debian

For a decade now snapshot.debian.org has been around for accessing old Debian packages and to find packages by dates and version numbers. Only now though is a guide materializing for leveraging this Debian "wayback machine" in order to help in bisecting regressions for the distribution that span multiple/unknown packages.

The bisecting is intended for Debian Sid users of the latest bleeding-edge packages and to helping track down what specific package versions may have introduced a regression. This Debian snapshot archive offers a JSON-based API to query changed packages based upon dates and from there with leveraging Git can make the bisecting manageable.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Programming Literature: Jussi Pakkanen on Meson, Shing Lyu on Rust and "25 Best JavaScript Books for Newbie and Professional"

  • Jussi Pakkanen: Meson manual sales status and price adjustment

    The second part (marked with a line) indicates when I was a guest on CppCast talking about Meson and the book. As an experiment I created a time limited discount coupon so that all listeners could buy it with €10 off. As you can tell from the graph it did have an immediate response, which again proves that marketing and visibility are the things that actually matter when trying to sell any product. After that we have the "new normal", which means no sales at all. I don't know if this is caused by the coronavirus isolation or whether this is the natural end of life for the product (hopefully the former but you can never really tell in advance).

  • Shing Lyu: Lessons learned in writing my first book

    You might have noticed that I didn’t update this blog frequently in the past year. It’s not because I’m lazy, but I focused all my creative energy on writing this book: Practical Rust Projects. The book is now available on Apress, Amazon and O’Reilly. In this post, I’ll share some of the lessons I learned in writing this book. Although I’ve been writing Rust for quite a few years, I haven’t really studied the internals of the Rust language itself. Many of the Rust enthusiasts whom I know seem to be having much fun appreciating how the language is designed and built. But I take more joy in using the language to build tangible things. Therefore, I’ve been thinking about writing a cookbook-style book on how to build practical projects with Rust, ever since I finished the video course Building Reusable Code with Rust. Out of my surprise, I received an email from Steve Anglin, an acquisition editor from Apress, in April 2019. He initially asked me to write a book on the RustPython project. But the project was still growing rapidly thanks to the contributors. I’ve already lost grip on the overall architecture, so I can’t really write much about it. So I proposed the topic I have in mind to Steve. Fortunately, the editorial board accepted my proposal, and we decided to write two books: one for general Rust projects and one for web-related Rust projects. Since this is my first time writing a book that will be published in physical form (or as The Rust Book put it, “dead tree form”), I learned quite a lot throughout the process. Hopefully, these points will help you if you are considering or are already writing your own book.

  • The 25 Best JavaScript Books for Newbie and Professional

    JavaScript is a programming language that is object-oriented and used to make dynamic web pages by adding interactive effects. This client-side scripting language is used by almost 94.5% web pages available on the internet. The language is very easy but also known as one of the most misunderstood programming languages. You should choose the right guidelines so that you can get all the answers to your questions related to JavaScript. Here we will provide you with a list of the best Javascript books so that you can learn JavaScript and never become confused.

today's howtos

This is my shoestring photography setup for image editing

Saving money is not the only major benefit of using inexpensive hardware and free open-source software. Somewhat surprisingly, the more important benefit for me personally is peace of mind. My primary machine is a 9-year old ThinkPad X220 with 4GB RAM and 120GB SSD. I bought it on eBay for around 200 euros, plus about 30 euros for a 120GB SSD. The digiKam application I use for most of my photo management and processing needs cost exactly zero. (I’m the author of the digiKam Recipes book.) I store my entire photo library on a USB 3.0 3TB Toshiba Canvio hard disk I bought for around 113 euros. If any component of my hardware setup fails, I can replace it without any significant impact on my budget. I don’t have to worry about a company deciding to squeeze more money out of me by either forcing me into a paid upgrade or a subscription plan, and I sleep better knowing that I own the software crucial for my photographic workflow. You might think that managing and processing RAW files and photos on a relatively old machine with a paltry amount of RAM is unbearably slow, but it’s not. While Windows would bring the ThinkPad X220 to its knees, the machine briskly runs openSUSE Linux with the KDE graphical desktop environment. The word Linux may send some photographers away screaming, but a modern Linux system is hardly more complicated in use than Windows. Read more

elementary OS: Hera Updates for March, 2020

Fresh on the heels of the AppCenter for Everyone Remote Sprint, we still managed to push out a good amount of updates over the course of March (and early April), bundled up in an OS 5.1.3 update. Let’s dive into what’s new. We continued our quest to make Code the best editor for elementary OS this month. A file’s Git status now shows in its tooltip in the project sidebar, making it easier to understand what the status icons mean—especially if you’re colorblind or just don’t remember. We also added an option for explicit case-sensitive find/replace for those times when you want to find or replace the word foo but not Foo. Read more Also: elementary OS 5.1.3 New Features Revealed