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Debian

The House of Elive Linux Revamped!

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GNU
Linux
Debian

I visited the www.elivecd.org, the page that houses Elive. This is one Linux distro that caught my eye in 2009 and that I have been following ever since.

The site is being redecorated and renovated, which is a great change to reflect the polished nature of the distro that Thanatermesis (Samuel Flores Baggen) crafts there.

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Also: DebConf in Taiwan!

Debian: DebConf 18, nacho and Tomu

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Debian
  • DebConf 18 – Day 2

    Although I have already returned from this year’s DebConf, I try to continue to write up my comments on the talks I have attended. The first one was DebConf 18 – Day 1, here we go for Day 2.

  • Final GSOC 2018 Report

    This is the final report of my 2018 Google Summer of Code project. It also serves as my final code submission.

    ...]

    The main project was nacho, the web frontend for the guest accounts of the Debian project. The software is now in a state where it can be used in a production enviroment and there is already work being done to deploy the application on Debian infrastructure. It was a lot of fun programming that software and i learned a lot about Python and Django. My mentors gave me valuable feedback and pointed me in the right direction in case i had questions. There are still some ideas or features that can be implemented and i’m sure some feature requests will come up in the future. Those can be tracked in the issue tracker in the salsa repository. An overview of the activity in the project, including both commits and issues, can be seen in the activity list.

    The SSO evaluations i did give an overview of existing solutions and will help in the decision making process. The README in the evaluation repository has a table taht summarizes the findings of the evaluations.

  • I am Tomu!

    While I was away for DebConf18, I received the Tomu boards I ordered on Crowdsupply a while ago while the project was still going through crowdfunding.

Debian Linux Package Support Hits Chrome OS Canary, Android Leftovers

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Android
Google
Debian
  • Debian Linux Package Support Hits Chrome OS Canary

    Google’s Chrome OS can now install and run Debian Linux packages with the .deb extension, at least in the Canary channel. This happens by simply double-clicking the file in your file browser. From there, the automated installer takes over. Once a Linux application is installed, it will be available in your terminal, invoked in the same way as a Chrome OS app, and some apps may show up in your Chrome OS launcher, depending on the metadata present in them and whether they support such operations. Most Linux apps that have a graphical user interface fall into this category, though there are many command line utilities out there for Linux users to enjoy. Both are now available to Chrome OS users. You still cannot replace default Chrome OS utilities, so don’t expect to run an i3 desktop with a brand new ALSA media handler unless you’re willing to gut your Chromebook entirely and install Linux.

  • Debian Linux Packages Now Working In Chrome OS Developer Channel

    A recent update to the experimental Canary Channel of Chrome OS brought about the ability to install Debian packages with a simple double-click. The only prerequisite being you are on a Chromebook or Chromebox that has support for the Crostini Project.

    Now, thanks to our Brother in Chrome Kevin Tofel, we’ve learned this ability has already found its way into the Developer channel of Chrome OS. Again, there are some requirements but if your device supports the Crostini Linux project, you can have this feature up and running with just a few, simple steps.

  • Android Q Name Predictions: What’s Next “Dessert” For Android 10?

    Now that Google has officially released Android Pie marking August 6th as the new “Pie” day, we are wondering what will Google call its next Android version: Android Q. In the past, we’ve also prepared a list of Android P names.

  • 6 Best Song Finder Apps For Android To Identify Songs By Tune
  • Google introduces Android 9 Pie

Debian: .Deb Packages in Chrome OS, GHDL Back in Debian

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Debian
  • Installing Linux app on Chromebooks gets easier with support for .deb packages

    You can already run some Linux applications on some Chromebooks thanks to Google’s Project Crostini software. But as I noted when testing Crostini on the Acer Chromebook Tab 10 last month, the feature is still very much a work in progress.

    For now it’s not available if you’re using the stable channel version of Chrome OS, it doesn’t run on all Chromebooks, and you have to jump through some hoops to enable Crostini. Once you do that, you’ll find that you generally need a little Linux know-how to find and install applications using the command-line apt tool.

  • Chrome OS Can Now Install Debian Linux Packages

    A few weeks back, I was tinkering around in the Canary channel and through some hacky loops and multiple attempts, I was able to install a Linux installer that allowed me to launch Debian(.deb) Linux packages on my Chromebox.

    Granted, the workaround was in vain as I got Steam up and running just to find that GPU support is still nowhere to be seen but hey, the installation worked so the experiment was a success.

  • GHDL Back in Debian

    As I have noted, I have been working on packaging the VHDL simulator GHDL for Debian after it has dropped out of the archive for a few years. This work has been on slow burner for a while and last week I used some time at DebConf 18 to finally push this to completion and upload it. ftpmasters were also working fast, so yesterday the package got accepted and is now available from Debian unstable.

    The package you get supports up to VHDL-93, which is entirely down to VHDL library issues. The libraries published by IEEE along with the VHDL standard are not free enough to be suitable for Debian main. Instead, the package uses the openieee libraries developed as part of GHDL, which are GPL’ed from-scratch implementations of the libraries required by the VHDL standard. Currently these only implement VHDL-89 and VHDL-93, hence the limitation.

Buster is headed for a long hard freeze

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Debian

We are getting better and better accumulating RC bugs in testing. This is unfortunate because the length of the freeze is strongly correlated with the number of open RC bugs affecting testing. If you believe that Debian should have short freezes, then it will require putting effort behind that belief and fix some RC bugs – even in packages that are not maintained directly by you or your team and especially in key packages.

The introduction of key packages have been interesting. On the plus side, we can use it to auto-remove RC buggy non-key packages from testing which has been very helpful. On the flip-side, it also makes it painfully obvious that over 50% of all RC bugs in testing are now filed against key packages (for the lazy; we are talking about 475 RC bugs in testing filed against key packages; about 25 of these appear to be fixed in unstable).

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The State Of Debian Linux On Various Mobile Devices

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Debian

At this past week's DebConf18 Debian conference was an update on running Debian GNU/Linux on various mobile / ultra-portable devices.

Among the mobile devices covered for being able to run Debian in 2018 include:

- The Purism Librem 5 smartphone is expected to support Debian GNU/Linux, especially with Purism's "PureOS" being Debian-based. Purism still hopes to ship their first smartphone in early 2019.

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DebConf18 closes in Hsinchu and DebConf19 dates announced

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Debian

Today, Sunday 5 August 2018, the annual Debian Developers and Contributors Conference came to a close. With over 306 people attending from all over the world, and 137 events including 100 talks, 25 discussion sessions or BoFs, 5 workshops and 7 other activities, DebConf18 has been hailed as a success.

Highlights included DebCamp with more than 90 participants, the Open Day, where events of interest to a broader audience were offered, plenaries like the traditional Bits from the DPL, a Questions and Answers session with Minister Audrey Tang, a panel discussion about "Ignoring negativity" with Bdale Garbee, Chris Lamb, Enrico Zini and Steve McIntyre, the talk "That's a free software issue!!" given by Molly de Blanc and Karen Sandler, lightning talks and live demos and the announcement of next year's DebConf (DebConf19 in Curitiba, Brazil).

The schedule has been updated every day, including 27 ad-hoc new activities, planned by attendees during the whole conference.

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Also: My Debian Activities in July 2018

AutoDeb Still Being Worked On For Automatically Generating Debian Packages

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Debian

AutoDeb is a long-standing effort to try to automate the creation of Debian packages as much as possible for trying to determine necessary dependencies of a program, will configure/build the program for Autotools-based projects, and end up generating a Debian binary package. AutoDeb was worked on as part of this year's Google Summer of Code for automatic Debian packaging.

AutoDeb saw some renewed attention this year as part of Google Summer of Code 2018. The purpose of AutoDeb isn't to obsolete Debian package maintainers, but rather to expedite the process for creating Debian backports, upgrading packages against their latest upstream sources, and provide for Debian packaging of "simple" Ruby/Python/Perl programs. More details on the GSoC 2018 work is outlined via the Debian Wiki.

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Debian and Debconf18 News

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Debian
  • Multiple people

    Starting from Debian, I have been for a long time part of various groups where diversity is accepted and valued, and it has been an invaluable supply of inspiration, allowing my identity to grow with unexpected freedom.

    During the last year, I have been thinking passionately about things such as diversity, gender identity, sexual orientation, neurodiversity, and preserving identity in a group.

    I would like to share some of those thoughts, and some of that passion.

  • Jose M. Calhariz: A Selection of talks from DebConf 2018

    This is my selection of talks from DebConf18.

  • Debconf18 group photo

    Enjoy the Debconf18 group photo and also the rest of my photos from Debconf18.

  • intrigeri: Report from the AppArmor BoF at DebConf18

    After a discussion started on debian-devel a year ago, AppArmor has been enabled by default in testing/sid since November 2017 as an experiment. We'll soon need to decide whether Buster ships with AppArmor by default or not. Clément Hermann and yours truly have hosted a BoF at DebConf18 in order to gather both subjective and factual data that can later be used to:

    draw conclusions from this experiment;
    identify problems we need to fix.

    About 40 people attended this BoF; about half of them to participated actively, which is better than I expected even though I think we can do better.

Microsoft Entryism/EEE: Canonical, Linux Foundation and Even DebConf18

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Linux
Debian
  • How to install PowerShell on Linux with snap [Ed: Because all you ever wanted from GNU/Linux was .NET framework with Microsoft Windows commands and a shell notoriously favoured by malware writers]
  • Open Source Summit Offers More Opportunities Than Ever for Collaboration and Learning with Dozens of Co-Located Events and Special Attendee Experiences [Ed: With "Gold Sponsor" Microsoft for this event. Zemlin clearly does not understand entryism. He even gave (sold) Microsoft seats on the LF's Board.]
  • Michelle Noorali: Helping Users and Developers Consume Open Source [Ed: Zemlin's Linux Foundation does Microsoft puff pieces again. FOSS is something you "consume" apparently (like swallowing). Quite frankly, when dealing with a company as corrupt as this Zemlin should reject their money and tell them where to go. Swapnil Bhartiya became a Microsoft stenographer provided Microsoft offers the money through the Linux Foundation.]
  • DebConf18 thanks its sponsors! [Ed: Worryingly enough, Debian accepted some cash from Microsoft ("Gold Sponsor") and it makes one wonder what might happen if high-level Debian people criticise this company, if they dare...]

    DebConf18 is taking place in Hsinchu, Taiwan, from July 29th to August 5th, 2018. It is the first Debian Annual Conference in Asia, with over 300 attendees and major advances for Debian and for Free Software in general.

    Thirty-two companies have committed to sponsor DebConf18! With a warm "thank you", we'd like to introduce them to you.

  • DebCamp18: Reporting my experience and technical work of my first DebCamp

    Last week I was attending my first DebCamp which was an amazing and enjoyable experience. In a nutshell, I was in the right environment to leverage my GSoC project since I was able to develop new features for Distro Tracker while interacting with other experienced Debian contributors who provided me highly valuable feedback and ideas. However, in this post, I will focus on reporting my main activities during DebCamp and presenting my early impressions.

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