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Debian

Debian Development and News

Filed under
Debian
  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, June 2018

    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

  • PKCS#11 v2.20

    By way of experiment, I've just enabled the PKCS#11 v2.20 implementation in the eID packages for Linux, but for now only in the packages in the "continuous" repository. In the past, enabling this has caused issues; there have been a few cases where Firefox would deadlock when PKCS#11 v2.20 was enabled, rather than the (very old and outdated) v2.11 version that we support by default. We believe we have identified and fixed all outstanding issues that caused such deadlocks, but it's difficult to be sure.

  • Plans for DebCamp and DebConf 18

    I recently became an active contributor to the Debian project, which has been consolidated throughout my GSoC project. In addition to the great learning with my mentors, Lucas Kanashiro and Raphäel Hertzog, the feedback from other community members has been very valuable to the progress we are making in the Distro Tracker. Tomorrow, thanks to Debian project sponsorship, I will take off for Hsinchu, Taiwan to attend DebCamp and DebConf18. It is my first DebConf and I’m looking forward to meeting new people from the Debian community, learn a lot and make useful contributions during the time I am there.

  • Building Debian packages in CI (ick)

    I develop a number of (fairly small) programs, as a hobby. Some of them I also maintain as packages in Debian. All of them I publish as Debian packages in my own APT repository. I want to make the process for making a release of any of my programs as easy and automated as possible, and that includes building Debian packages and uploading them to my personal APT repository, and to Debian itself.

  • My DebCamp/DebConf 18 plans

    Tomorrow I am going to another DebCamp and DebConf; this time at Hsinchu, Taiwan.

  • Things you can do with Debian: multimedia editing

    The Debian operating system serves many purposes and you can do amazing things with it. Apart of powering the servers behind big internet sites like Wikipedia and others, you can use Debian in your PC or laptop. I’ve been doing that for many years.

    One of the great things you can do is some multimedia editing. It turns out I love nature, outdoor sports and adventures, and I usually take videos and photos with my friends while doing such activities. And when I arrive home I love editing them for my other blog, or putting them together in a video.

You can now install Debian Linux apps directly from your Chromebook’s Files app

Filed under
Linux
Debian

Last month, XDA-Developers spotted a string of commits on the Chromium Gerrit which indicated of an upcoming support for easy installation of Linux apps on compatible Chrome OS devices. The commits suggested that Debian (.deb) files will be clickable from the Files app, which will then trigger the installation. Now a recent commit confirms that Google is indeed adding a file handler for Debian packages within the Chrome OS Files app.

Read more

Debian: Google Summer of Code, Debian 9.5, and Tails

Filed under
Debian
  • Google Summer of Code with a Debian Project

    Yes! My project proposal was selected.

    First of all I want to mention that I began my open source adventure with Debian.

    I started to participate in the open source events like Hackathons, BSP and Conferences and doing small contribution to different projects and this is how everything started.

  • Debian 9.5 Released: “Rock Solid” GNU/Linux Distro Arrives With Spectre v2 Fix

    Following the fourth point release of Debian 9 “stretch” in March, the developers of the popular GNU/Linux distro have shipped the latest update to its stable distribution. For those who don’t know, Debian 9 is an LTS version that’ll remain supported for 5 years.

    As one would expect, this point release doesn’t bring any set of new features and keeps focusing on improving an already stable experience by delivering security patches and bug fixes. In case you’re looking for an option that brings new features, you can check out the recently released Linux Mint 19.

  • Your Help Is Needed to Test VeraCrypt Support in the Tails Anonymous OS, GNOME

    The team behind the famous Tails operating system, also known as the Amnesic Incognito Live System or simply Anonymous OS, needs your help to test the integration of the VeraCrypt disk encryption software.

    In an attempt to provide Tails users with better security, the team is working hard these days on the integration of the VeraCrypt open-source and free disk encryption utility used for on-the-fly encryption of encrypted disk drives into the next-generation Tails OS as well as the GNOME desktop environment it uses by default.

    This will let Tails users easily unlock encrypted volumes on-the-fly when using the anonymous live system to stay hidden online while protecting their identity and privacy. To makes things even easier, they created the VeraCrypt Mounter utility for unlocking VeraCrypt encrypted drives.

Debian GNU/Linux 9.5 "Stretch" Is Now Available with 100 Security Updates

Filed under
Security
Debian

Coming four months after the previous point release, Debian GNU/Linux 9.5 "Stretch" includes a total of 100 security update and 91 miscellaneous bugfixes for various core components and applications. However, this remains a point release and doesn't represent a new version of the Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system series, which continues to be updated every day.

"This point release mainly adds corrections for security issues, along with a few adjustments for serious problems. Security advisories have already been published separately and are referenced where available. Please note that the point release does not constitute a new version of Debian 9 but only updates some of the packages included," reads today's announcement.

Read more

Also: Debian 9.5 Released With Security Fixes, Updated Intel Microcode For Spectre V2

Updated Debian 9: 9.5 released

Debian Joins KDE's Advisory Board

Filed under
KDE
Debian

Since the KDE Advisory Board was created in 2016, we have been encouraging more and more organizations to join it, either as patrons or as non-profit partner organizations. With Ubuntu (via Canonical) and openSUSE (via SUSE) we already had two popular Linux distributions represented in the Advisory board. They are now joined by one of the biggest and oldest purely community-driven distributions: Debian.

KDE has a long-standing and friendly relationship with Debian, and we are happy to formalize it now. Having Debian on our Advisory Board will allow us to learn from them, share our experience with them, and deepen our collaboration even further.

Read more

Debian, Ubuntu and Kubuntu: Development, Infographic and KDE Plasma 5.12.6

Filed under
KDE
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Debian LTS work, June 2018

    I was assigned 15 hours of work by Freexian's Debian LTS initiative and worked 12 hours, so I have carried 3 hours over to July. Since Debian 7 "wheezy" LTS ended at the end of May, I prepared for Debian 8 "jessie" to enter LTS status.

    I prepared a stable update of Linux 3.16, sent it out for review, and then released it. I rebased jessie's linux package on this, but didn't yet upload it.

  • Graphical environments in the world of IoT

    The IoT promises to bring about a revolution in the way we interact with devices around us. While many IoT devices will be hidden away, from sensors that measure manufacturing tolerances in a factory to hubs that control lighting around the home, there are a class of devices that need to provide some sort of graphical output or display to the user. Some examples include digital signage, interactive kiosks, automotive in-car entertainment gateways, smart meters, and the plethora of display screens seen on everything from washing machines to smart thermostats. All of these examples need some way to output graphics to a screen display but in an embedded environment that is not always easy.

    Linux is one of the most popular OS choices for manufacturers and solution providers to use in IoT devices and with it there are a few options available for graphical environments. From custom software to drive the display, through direct frame buffer access with toolkits such as QT, to a full X windowing server. All of these options have their pros and cons and often it is a trade-off between custom software and off-the-shelf components to speed up development. Custom software takes time and requires developers to continue to maintain a code base for the lifetime of the device, while using a graphical toolkit such as QT requires less code but comes with commercial licencing. The open source X windowing server is a popular choice but, being over 30 years old, has some shortcomings. It has been well documented that the design of X windows, although revolutionary at the time, has some security risks especially around application isolation and privilege escalation which has led to efforts to replace it by redesigning the graphical server from the ground up. One such effort is Mir.

  • Canonical releases new infographic to show how Ubuntu Linux 'connects everything'

    To highlight the ubiquitous nature of Ubuntu in particular, Canonical today releases an all-new infographic showing how this distribution "connects everything." I urge you to give it a look, as it will open your eyes to just how important Ubuntu -- and Linux overall -- really is. Apparently, this is an update to a previous infographic released in 2016, refreshed for 2018 following the release of Ubuntu 18.04 Bionic Beaver.

  • This Infographic Reveals the Sheer Scale of Ubuntu’s Success

    Ever wondered just how widely used Ubuntu is? Well, wonder no more! Canonical has put together a new infographic to highlight the scale and success Ubuntu has achieved across an enviable assortment of computing sectors. And it’s compelling stuff.

  • Infographic: Ubuntu Linux Is Used by Millions Worldwide and Connects Everything

    Canonical has shared with us today a new infographic that shows how their Ubuntu Linux operating system is being used all over the world by big-name companies the offer their services to millions of consumers.

    More than two years ago, when Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) was released, Canonical put together an infographic to show the world how many people use Ubuntu and on which devices. With Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) out the door this year, they did it again and published a brand-new infographic to show the world that Ubuntu and Linux are everywhere.

  • Kubuntu 18.04 LTS Users Can Now Update to the KDE Plasma 5.12.6 LTS Desktop

    The Kubuntu team announced today the immediate availability of the latest KDE Plasma 5.12.6 LTS desktop environment for the Kubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system series.

    Released on April 26, 2018, Kubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system is supported for three years with software and security updates, which means that is ships with the long-term supported version of the KDE Plasma desktop environment, KDE Plasma 5.12 LTS.

Events: Open Source Summit, GUADEC and Debconf

Filed under
Linux
GNOME
Debian
  • Open Collaboration in Practice at Open Source Summit

    A key goal in my career is growing the understanding and best practice of how communities, and open source communities in particular, can work well together. There is a lot of nuance to this work, and the best way to build a corpus of best practice is to bring people together to share ideas and experience.

    In service of this, last year I reached out to The Linux Foundation about putting together an event focused on these "people" elements of Open Source such as community management, collaborative workflow, governance, managing conflict, and more. It was called the Open Community Conference, which took place at the Open Source Summit events in Los Angeles and Prague, and everything went swimmingly.

  • Bastian Ilsø Hougaard: GUADEC 2018 Day 3

    Surprisingly, the castle tour featured an exciting belly dance and a bonus theater show starring GNOME’s legendary actors.

  • Taiwan Travel Blog - Day 1

    I'm going to DebConf18 later this month, and since I had some free time and I speak a somewhat understandable mandarin, I decided to take a full month of vacation in Taiwan.

    I'm not sure if I'll keep blogging about this trip, but so far it's been very interesting and I felt the urge to share the beauty I've seen with the world.

    This was the first proper day I spent in Taiwan. I arrived on the 8th during the afternoon, but the time I had left was all spent traveling to Hualien County (花蓮縣) were I intent to spend the rest of my time before DebConf.

  • Still not going to Debconf....  (100%)

        

    I was looking forward to this year's Debconf in Taiwan, the first in Asia, and the perspective of attending it with no jet lag, but I happen to be moving to Okinawa and changing jobs on August 1st, right at the middle of it...

SteamOS has a minor update to test the waters before a bigger update

Filed under
OS
Debian
Gaming

Really good to see this. SteamOS had a small update recently, which is testing the waters towards a bigger update.

If you've been wondering why SteamOS updates had been so quiet, it seems Valve has been working on updating their build infrastructure. They have another updating coming, to finally update the graphics drivers and kernel versions which will also be great to have.

Read more

Direct: SteamOS update 2.151 pushed to brewmaster beta

Tiny SBC runs Linux on low-power i.MX6 ULL

Filed under
Linux
Debian

NXElec has launched an 80 x 42mm “Innostick 6” SBC that runs Linux on a low-power, 900MHz i.MX6 ULL SoC, and offers up to 32GB eMMC, WiFi, Bluetooth, and USB host and OTG ports.

Nine-year old embedded firm Shanghai Naxing Electronics (NXElec), which makes the BeagleBone Companion Board and BeadaFrame LCD Display Kit for BeagleBoard, has now moved to the NXP world with a miniscule Innostick 6 SBC. The 80 x 42mm board features the low-power, i.MX6 ULL, a variation on the i.MX6 UltraLite (UL) that similarly offers a single Cortex-A7 core, in this case clocked to 900MHz. Other i.MX6 ULL SBCs include MYIR’s 70 x 55mm MYS-6ULX and PolyVection’s open source VoltaStream Zero, an audio streaming SBC that features a similarly petite footprint.

Read more

Raspbian wizard and app store toss a lifeline to newbies

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
Debian

Raspbian has been updated with a a setup wizard and an app store. Meanwhile, Alpine Linux 3.8.0 adds RPi 3 B+ support, BusyBox 1.29 improves router support, and SUSE (as in Linux) was sold to EQT.

The Raspberry Pi Foundation has updated the leading Linux distribution for the Raspberry Pi, which may also be the most popular embedded Linux distro. The update to the Debian-based Raspbian adds a setup wizard and a catalog of free apps, among other features. Other Linux software news in recent days includes new Alpine Linux and BusyBox releases, and the sale of SUSE to EQT (see farther below).

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

Debian Development and News

  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, June 2018
    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.
  • PKCS#11 v2.20
    By way of experiment, I've just enabled the PKCS#11 v2.20 implementation in the eID packages for Linux, but for now only in the packages in the "continuous" repository. In the past, enabling this has caused issues; there have been a few cases where Firefox would deadlock when PKCS#11 v2.20 was enabled, rather than the (very old and outdated) v2.11 version that we support by default. We believe we have identified and fixed all outstanding issues that caused such deadlocks, but it's difficult to be sure.
  • Plans for DebCamp and DebConf 18
    I recently became an active contributor to the Debian project, which has been consolidated throughout my GSoC project. In addition to the great learning with my mentors, Lucas Kanashiro and Raphäel Hertzog, the feedback from other community members has been very valuable to the progress we are making in the Distro Tracker. Tomorrow, thanks to Debian project sponsorship, I will take off for Hsinchu, Taiwan to attend DebCamp and DebConf18. It is my first DebConf and I’m looking forward to meeting new people from the Debian community, learn a lot and make useful contributions during the time I am there.
  • Building Debian packages in CI (ick)
    I develop a number of (fairly small) programs, as a hobby. Some of them I also maintain as packages in Debian. All of them I publish as Debian packages in my own APT repository. I want to make the process for making a release of any of my programs as easy and automated as possible, and that includes building Debian packages and uploading them to my personal APT repository, and to Debian itself.
  • My DebCamp/DebConf 18 plans
    Tomorrow I am going to another DebCamp and DebConf; this time at Hsinchu, Taiwan.
  • Things you can do with Debian: multimedia editing
    The Debian operating system serves many purposes and you can do amazing things with it. Apart of powering the servers behind big internet sites like Wikipedia and others, you can use Debian in your PC or laptop. I’ve been doing that for many years. One of the great things you can do is some multimedia editing. It turns out I love nature, outdoor sports and adventures, and I usually take videos and photos with my friends while doing such activities. And when I arrive home I love editing them for my other blog, or putting them together in a video.

32-Bit Vs. 64-Bit Operating System

This has really been confusing to some people choosing between 32-bit and 64-bit systems. Head over to any operating system’s website, you will be given a choice to download either versions of the same operating system. So what is the difference? Why do we have two different versions of the same OS? Let us solve this mystery here, once and for all. Read more

Convert video using Handbrake

Recently, when my son asked me to digitally convert some old DVDs of his high school basketball games, I immediately knew I would use Handbrake. It is an open source package that has all the tools necessary to easily convert video into formats that can be played on MacOS, Windows, Linux, iOS, Android, and other platforms. Handbrake is open source and distributable under the GPLv2 license. It's easy to install on MacOS, Windows, and Linux, including both Fedora and Ubuntu. In Linux, once it's installed, it can be launched from the command line with $ handbrake or selected from the graphical user interface. (In my case, that is GNOME 3.) Read more

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