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Red Hat

Flirting With Red Hat and Fedora Games Spin 25

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Red Hat
  • Q&A: Flying the open source flag

    Red Hat’s vice-president and general manager for the ASEAN region, Damien Wong, sheds light on the company’s strategy for tackling a market that is not used to paying for software

  • Coming off a strong quarter, Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst talks public clouds and containers

    Coming off a quarterly earnings report that shattered expectations, Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst believes his company is as well-positioned to capitalize on the shift to cloud computing as it ever has been.

    Red Hat is in a very interesting place in 2017, with one foot in two different eras of enterprise computing but thriving in that position instead of feeling trapped. It still makes most of its money selling Red Hat Enterprise Linux to companies running their own data centers, but it has become the de facto leader of the OpenStack cloud computing project and has interesting DevOps products in Ansible (IT automation) and OpenShift (container management).

    On Tuesday, the company reported a 19 percent increase in both revenue and net income to $677 million and $73 million, respectively, during its first fiscal quarter of the year. Financial analysts, who peppered Whitehurst with more than their usual share of “Great quarter!” asides during a conference call, were expecting revenue of $648 million according to Marketwatch. The company also raised revenue guidance for its full fiscal year.

  • Fedora Games Spin 25

    Fedora Games Spin can be downloaded from https://labs.fedoraproject.org/games/download/index.html. Here, you can choose from the 32- or 64-bit version of the OS. Download the version you need and save it to your hard disk.

Fedora: Design Team, QtWebKit Security, Badges, and Multimedia

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Red Hat
  • Building Design Team Approved Presentations

    Throughout the last month I’ve been working on creating an updated presentation template for the Fedora community to use. With Flock coming up quickly, there’s no better time to give these new templates a shot as a vehicle to present your talks!

  • Improving QtWebKit security for Fedora

    The Qt port of the WebKit engine was unmaintained for years, until Konstantin Tokarev (also known as annulen) decided to pick it up about ten months ago. Within the last months he did an impressive job on getting QtWebKit up to date again, some days ago he released the second alpha of QtWebKit 5.212.0. As the current state of QtWebkit is really bad in Fedora, we always shipped the latest one from Qt upstream, but they did not do any backports of security fixes from upstream WebKit anymore, the KDE SIG now decided to move to the new community QtWebKit. Qt itself only supports the QtWebEngine based on Chromium, which itself has some issues (hard to maintain as we have to remove codec stuff, always some Chromium releases behind) , but more important: Many applications have not been ported and still use QtWebKit. With Konstantins work on QtWebKit it is possible to use them without all these unfixed security issues again. There are also some reasons to use QtWebKit instead of QtWebEngine, checkout the QtWebKit Wiki.

  • Earn Fedora Badges designing Badges!

    Fedora Badges is a perfect place to start if you want to help out the Fedora Design Team. “I’m not a designer!” “I can’t draw!” “I’ve never opened Inkscape” – you might say. And that is totally fine! Everybody can help out, and none of those reasons will stop you from designing your first badge (and getting badges for designing badges).

  • Plex Media Player and MPV with CUDA

    The Plex Media Player is now part of the multimedia repository for Fedora 25+. I works as a standalone player and also as the main interface for an HTPC setup, where the “TV interface” starts as the main thing when you power up your system.

    Plex Media Player uses MPV in the background, so any compilation option that was added to MPV, is now also part of Plex Media Player by using the same libraries that were already available in the multimedia repository.

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • By the numbers: Red Hat execs' total compensation dips for fiscal 2017

    When it comes to total compensation, including stock awards, Red Hat (NYSE: RHT) CEO Jim Whitehurst saw a dip in fiscal 2017 earnings, according to a proxy statement.

  • Modular F27 Server Edition – initial design

    Recently, I have started a discussion on the Server mailing list about building the Fedora 27 Server Edition using Modularity. Langdon White is already working on a change request. If that happens, there will be a lot of work in front of us. So let’s start with writing blog posts!

  • Fedora 26 beta finally rolls out
  • PHP version 7.0.21RC1 and 7.1.7RC1

    Release Candidate versions are available in remi-test repository for Fedora and Enterprise Linux (RHEL / CentOS) to allow more people to test them. They are available as Software Collections, for a parallel installation, perfect solution for such tests (for x86_64 only), and also as base packages.

No-frills networking appliance runs Linux on Apollo Lake

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Linux
Red Hat

Win Enterprises unveiled a “PL-81210” networking appliance that runs Linux on a dual-core Atom x5-E3930, and offers mini-PCIe, mSATA, and up to 4x GbE.

Win Enterprises has launched a low-end networking appliance with three or four Gigabit Ethernet ports, a WAN port, and mini-PCIe expansion. The fanless, PL-81210 runs Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 6.4 on a dual-core Intel Atom x5-E3930 from the most recent Apollo Lake generation.

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gThumb: View and manage your photos in Fedora

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Red Hat

Fedora uses Eye of GNOME to display images, but it’s a very basic program. Out of the box, Fedora doesn’t have a great tool for managing photos. If you’re familiar with the Fedora Workstation’s desktop environment, GNOME, then you may be familiar with GNOME Photos. This is a young app available in GNOME Software that seeks to make managing photos a painless task. You may not know that there’s a more robust tool out there that packs more features and looks just as at home on Fedora. It’s called gThumb.

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Fedora version upgrade - Laptop with Nvidia

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Red Hat

Several months ago, I wrote an article on the Fedora in-vivo upgrade mechanism using dnf. The upgrade went smoothly, going from version 24 to version 25 on my G50 laptop. Now, let us make this thing more challenging.

Today, I shall attempt to upgrade Fedora 23 to Fedora 25, a two-version skip, on my somewhat antiquated LG RD510 notebook, which also happens to have an Nvidia graphics card, and also using the relevant proprietary drivers. As promised, here we go. Let's see if we can match the success of the previous adventure.

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Red Hat's Latest Product/Service and Great Results

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Red Hat

Flatpak Linux App Sandboxing Receives New Feature That Hardens Its Security

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Red Hat
Security

The Flatpak open-source GNU/Linux application sandboxing and distribution framework has been updated with a new feature that should harden its security.

Alex Larsson has recently released Flatpak versions 0.9.6 and 0.8.7, which comes about two weeks after their previous point releases to implement a new feature that will avoid creating world-writable directories or setuid files, including in the Flatpak export functionality.

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Red Hat Soars, Upgraded, Jim Whitehurst Speaks Out

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Red Hat
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