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Red Hat

Change of Fedora Strategy (IBM) and Microsoft EEE of Fedora

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Red Hat
Microsoft

Fedora Toolbox — Under the hood

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Red Hat

A few months ago, we had a glimpse at Fedora Toolbox setting up a seamlessly integrated RPM based environment, complete with dnf, on Fedora Silverblue. But isn’t dnf considered a persona non grata on Silverblue? How is this any different from using the existing Fedora Workstation then? What’s going on here?

Today we shall look under the covers to answer some of these questions.

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Fedora: Fedora Modularity, Radeon Open Compute (ROCm), MongoDB

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Red Hat
  • Why did Fedora Modularity fail in 2017? A brief reflection

    For the ISTE-430 Information Requirements Modelling course at the Rochester Institute of Technology, students are asked to analyze an example of a failed software project and write a short summary on why it failed. For the assignment, I evaluated the December 2017 announcement on Fedora Modularity. I thought it was an interesting example of a project that experienced initial difficulty but re-calibrated and succeeded in the end. And it is a project I am biased towards, as a Fedora user and sysadmin.

    I thought sharing it on my blog might be interesting for others. Don’t read into this too much – it was a quick analysis from a single primary source and a few secondary references.

  • Some Radeon ROCm Packages Pending Review For Fedora

    Earlier this month was word that Fedora developers were looking at packaging Radeon Open Compute (ROCm) to make it easier for their distribution users to enjoy this open-source Radeon GPU computing software from OpenCL to a TensorFlow port. Some of the early packages of ROCm are now under review for Fedora.

  • A Red Hat-backed open source project warns that a controversial new plan to take on Amazon and other tech titans is only causing 'Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt'

    Open source software companies like MongoDB are making drastic moves to protect their intellectual property from cloud giants like Amazon or Alibaba — but a clash between MongoDB and $31 billion software giant Red Hat highlights the potential pitfalls of that strategy.

    Fedora, a Red Hat-sponsored open source operating system, has dropped support for the very popular MongoDB database. Although Fedora is sponsored by Red Hat, and has project leaders who work at Red Hat, it's technically a separately-run open source project. Fedora cited concerns over the company's controversial new licensing agreement, and indeed, Fedora has tacked MongoDB's SSPL onto its "bad license" list.

    This comes months after Red Hat, which is on the cusp of being acquired by IBM, removed MongoDB support from its Red Hat Enterprise Linux OS in November.

Server Side Public License (SSPL), Red Hat and Fedora

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Red Hat
OSS
Legal
  • Red Hat/Fedora decide MongoDB’s SSLP doesn’t fit

    MongoDB’s January blues deepened this week as the team behind the Red Hat-backed Fedora Linux distribution confirmed it had added the open source database’s Server Side Public License to its “bad”list.

    The move came as it emerged Red Hat – Fedora’s sponsor – had nixed MongoDB support in RHEL 8.0.

  • AWS Raised Its Hand Lest Of Open Source Platform

    Even though AWS stands by MongoDB as the best the customers find it difficult to build and vastly accessible applications on the open-source platform can range from multiple terabytes to hundreds of thousands of reads and writes per second. Thus, the company built its own document database with an Apache 2.0 open source MongoDB 3.6 API compatibility. The open-sources politics are quite difficult to grasp. AWS has been blamed for taking the top open-source projects and re-branding plus re-using it without providing the communities. The catch here is that MongoDB was the company behind putting a halt to the re-licensing of the open-source tools under a novel license that clearly stated the companies willing to do this will have to purchase a commercial license.

  • Red Hat gets heebie-jeebies over MongoDB's T&Cs squeeze: NoSQL database dropped from RHEL 8B over license

    MongoDB justified its decision last October to shift the free version of its NoSQL database software, MongoDB Community Server, from the open-source GNU Affero General Public License to the not-quite-so-open Server Side Public License (SSPL) by arguing that cloud providers sell open-source software as a service without giving back.

    The following month, and not widely noticed until this week, Red Hat said it would no longer include MongoDB in version 8 of Red Hat Enterprise Linux. The removal notice came in the release notes for Red Hat Enterprise Linux Beta 8.0.

    Under section 4.7, the release notes say, "Note that the NoSQL MongoDB database server is not included in RHEL 8.0 Beta because it uses the Server Side Public License (SSPL)."

  • Server Side Public License struggles to gain open-source support

    MongoDB first announced the release of the new software license in October as a way to protect itself and other open-source projects like it from being taken advantage of by larger companies for monetary gain.

    At the time, MongoDB co-founder and CTO Eliot Horowitz explained: “This should be a time of incredible opportunity for open source. The revenue generated by a service can be a great source of funding for open-source projects, far greater than what has historically been available. The reality, however, is that once an open-source project becomes interesting, it is too easy for large cloud vendors to capture most of the value while contributing little or nothing back to the community.”

    Other open-source businesses have developed their own licenses or adopted others in recent months, citing the same issues. However, the problem with these new licenses is that if they are not approved by the Open Source Initiative (OSI), an organization created to promote and protect the open-source ecosystem, the software behind the license is technically not considered open source, and it will have a hard time getting acceptance from members in the community.

  • Open source has a problem with monetization, not AWS
  • Why you should take notice of the open source in enterprise suckers conundrum

    In the MongoDB case, AWS is widely regarded as responding to a licensing change MongoDB made in October 2018 that has caused something of a stir among the open source cognoscenti.

  • Fedora Community Blog: FPgM report: 2019-03

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora Program Management this week.

    I’ve set up weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

Red Hat Advances Container Technology With Podman 1.0

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Red Hat
Server

Red Hat announced the 1.0 release of its open-source Podman project on Jan. 17, which provides a fully featured container engine.

In Podman 1.0, Red Hat has integrated multiple core security capabilities in an effort to help enable organizations run containers securely. Among the security features are rootless containers and enhanced user namespace support for better container isolation. Containers provide a way for organizations to run applications in a virtualized approach on top of an existing operating system. With the 1.0 release, Red Hat is now also positioning Podman as an alternative to the Docker Engine technology for application container deployment.

"We felt the sum total of its features, as well as the project's performance, security and stability, made it reasonable to move to 1.0," Scott McCarty, product manager, Containers, Red Hat, told eWEEK. "Since Podman is set to be the default container engine for the single-node use case in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8, we wanted to make some pledges about its supportability."

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Also: Update on Volume Snapshot Alpha for Kubernetes

How Do You Fedora: Journey into 2019

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Red Hat

Jose plans on continuing to push open source initiatives such as cloud and container infrastructures. He will also continue teaching advanced Unix systems administration. “I am now helping a new generation of Red Hat Certified Professionals seek their place in the world of open source. It is indeed a joy when a student mentions they have obtained their certification because of what they were exposed to in my class.” He also plans on spending some more time with his art again.

Carlos would like to write for Fedora Magazine and help bring the magazine to the Latin American community. “I would like to contribute to Fedora Magazine. If possible I would like to help with the magazine in Spanish.”

Akinsola wants to hold a Fedora a release part in 2019. “I want make many people aware of Fedora, make them aware they can be part of the release and it is easy to do.” He would also like to ensure that new Fedora users have an easy time of adapting to their new OS.

Kevin is planning is excited about 2019 being a time of great change for Fedora. “In 2019 I am looking forward to seeing what and how we retool things to allow for lifecycle changes and more self service deliverables. I think it’s going to be a ton of work, but I am hopeful we will come out of it with a much better structure to carry us forward to the next period of Fedora success.” Kevin also had some words of appreciation for everyone in the Fedora community. “I’d like to thank everyone in the Fedora community for all their hard work on Fedora, it wouldn’t exist without the vibrant community we have.”

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Server Side Public License (SSPL) Fallout

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Red Hat
Server
OSS
  • Red Hat drops MongoDB over concerns related to its Server Side Public License (SSPL)

    It was last year in October when MongoDB announced that it’s switching to Server Side Public License (SSPL). Now, the news of Red Hat removing MongoDB from its Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Fedora over its SSPL license has been gaining attention.

  • The Need for Sustainable Open Source Projects

    The point of the article is a lot of companies that support open source projects, like RedisDB, are moving to more closed source solutions to survive. The cloud providers are called out as a source of a lot of problems in this article, as they consume a lot of open source software, but do not really spend a lot of time or effort in supporting it. Open source, in this situation, becomes a sort of tragedy of the commons, where everyone thinks someone else is going to do the hard work of making a piece of software viable, so no-one does any of the work. Things are made worse because the open source version of the software is often "good enough" to solve 80% of the problems users need solved, so there is little incentive to purchase anything from the companies that do the bulk of the work in the community.

  • MongoDB’s licensing changes led Red Hat to drop the database from the latest version of its server OS

    After MongoDB decided last year that it was changing the license for its open-source database to a more restrictive version, Red Hat decided it would no longer include MongoDB in the latest version of its flagship Red Hat Enterprise Linux operating system.

    The change apparently went unnoticed until a Hacker News thread took off earlier today, but it was included in the release notes for RHEL 8.0, which was released in beta last November. In those notes, Red Hat states “note that the NoSQL MongoDB database server is not included in RHEL 8.0 Beta because it uses the Server Side Public License (SSPL).”

Fedora Still Needs Help Testing The New Zchunk Metadata Support

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Red Hat

Fedora has been working on transitioning to Zchunk for its DNF metadata due to its good compression ratio while being delta-friendly and leveraging the existing work of Zstandard and Zsync/casync. The metadata has been offered in Zchunk for some weeks while more client testing is needed before landing that support in Rawhide and in turn for Fedora 30.

The goal of this Zchunk metadata for Fedora is to speed-up DNF operations by needing to download less metadata. While the server bits are in place, additional client testing is desired before landing the updated packages in Fedora Rawhide where it will affect all users on this development build of Fedora ahead of the Fedora 30 release due out in the spring.

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Also: NOTICE: Epylog has been retired for Fedora Rawhide/30

Systemd 241 Paired With Linux 4.19+ To Enable New Regular File & FIFO Protection

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Linux
Red Hat

The Linux 4.19 kernel brought the ability to disallow the opening of FIFOs and regular files not owned by the user in world-writable sticky directories in the name of security. Had this ability been around previously it could have prevented a number of CVEs going back a long time. In helping ensure this functionality gets utilized, Systemd 241 will now set these sysctl options to enable the behavior by default.

The restricted O_CREAT of FIFOs and regular files is not enforced by the kernel by default as it could be considered a breaking change but with systemd 241+ it sets the fs.protected_regular and fs.protected_fifos sysctls to enabled for having said functionality, similar to systemd's enforcing of hardlink/symlink protection. This protection is for avoiding unintentional writes to an attacker-controlled FIFO or regular file. That Linux 4.19 kernel commit notes at least a handful of security vulnerabilities that could have been prevented by this functionality with those CVEs going back to at least the year 2000.

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Testing openSUSE, Manjaro, Debian, Fedora, and Mint Linux distributions on my new laptop

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Linux
Red Hat
Debian
SUSE

Due to the recent unfortunate demise of a couple of my computers I found myself in need of a new laptop on rather short notice. I found an Acer Aspire 5 on sale at about half price here in Switzerland, so I picked one up. I have been installing a number of Linux distributions on it, with mostly positive results.

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Software: DICOM Viewers, gotop and Cockpit

  • Top 11 Free Linux DICOM Viewers for Doctors
    DICOM stands for Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine and it is the international open image format for handling, storing, printing, and transmitting information in medical images. Medical images are used in the identification and examination of physical injuries and diseases via procedures like Xrays, CT scans, etc. This article lists the best free Linux applications used for processing images generated by DICOM devices.
  • gotop: Graphical System Monitor For The Command Line
    gotop is a terminal-based (TUI) system monitor for Linux and macOS. The software is inspired by gtop and vtop, but while these 2 utilities use Node.js, gotop is written in Go. The command line tool supports mouse clicking and scrolling, comes with vi-keys, and it displays the CPU, memory and network usage history using colored graphs, while also displaying their current values. gotop also shows the disk usage, temperatures and a top process list, which includes CPU and memory usage.
  • Cockpit 186
    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 186.

Netrunner's Unique Blackbird Soars to New Heights

Blackbird, Netrunner's version 19.01 release, hit the download servers on Jan. 14, and this distro deserves to be considered bleeding-edge. Netrunner is a step ahead of other KDE distros, thanks to its solid integration of classic KDE desktop performance with Web-based applications and cloud services. That said, if you aren't fondness of the K Desktop, Netrunner may leave you wanting more desktop simplicity. For that you must look elsewhere. KDE is the only desktop available from the Germany-based Blue Systems development team. Blackbird is based on Debian's "Testing" branch. Its developer brings some aggressive updates to the distro that propel it ahead of other distros' regular development cycles. The main updates include KDE Plasma 5.14.3, KDE Frameworks 5.51, KDE Applications 18.08 and Qt 5.11.3 for its essential security updates. Linux Kernel 4.19, Firefox Quantum 64.0 and Thunderbird 60.3 push the envelope as well. One of the more noticeable new features in Blackbird is its new Netrunner Black theme. This theme is based on a dark-toned contrasting visual. It uses the Kvantum theme engine, plus the Alpha-Black Plasma theme, to produce a more 3D-looking design. Read more

Mozilla Masking 'Content', ffsend and New Accountant or Chief Financial Officer (CFO)

  • Mozilla Open Policy & Advocacy Blog: Brussels Mozilla Mornings – Disinformation and online advertising: an unhealthy relationship?
    On the morning of 19 February, Mozilla will host the second of our Mozilla Mornings series – regular breakfast meetings where we bring together policy experts, policymakers and practitioners for insight and discussion on the latest EU digital policy developments. This session will be devoted to disinformation and online advertising. Our expert panel will seek to unpack the relation between the two and explore policy solutions to ensure a healthy online advertising ecosystem.
  • ffsend – Easily And Securely Share Files From Linux Command Line Using Firefox Send Client
    Linux users were preferred to go with scp or rsync for files or folders copy. However, so many new options are coming to Linux because it’s a opensource. Anyone can develop a secure software for Linux. We had written multiple articles in our site in the past about this topic. Even, today we are going to discuss the same kind of topic called ffsend.
  • Welcome Roxi Wen, our incoming Chief Financial Officer
    I am excited to announce that Roxi Wen is joining Mozilla Corporation as our Chief Financial Officer (CFO) next month. As a wholly-owned subsidiary of the non-profit Mozilla Foundation, the Mozilla Corporation, with over 1,000 full-time employees worldwide, creates products, advances public policy and explores new technology that give people more control over their lives online, and shapes the future of the global internet platform for the public good. As our CFO Roxi will become a key member of our senior executive team with responsibility for leading financial operations and strategy as we scale our mission impact with new and existing products, technology and business models to better serve our users and advance our agenda for a healthier internet.

Security: apt/apt-get, Blockchains and More