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Red Hat

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • 3 solid self-review tips for sysadmins | Enable Sysadmin

    At every job I’ve held, the general opinion about self-reviews tends to fall into one of two categories. Either employees view them as arduous and frustrating or they simply don’t care about them. However, I believe that a well-written self-review can help you accelerate your career, whether your goal is a raise, a promotion, or merely some well-deserved recognition for your efforts. In this article, I’ll discuss my approach to performance reviews. While there is no one-size-fits-all strategy, this approach has served me well through several organizations and positions.

  • Red Hat OpenShift drives a strong 5G open RAN ecosystem

    As the telecommunications industry ramps up its evolution towards cloud-native architectures and containers, communications service providers (CSPs) are working to scale their networks to support increased demand. In this effort, open radio access network (RAN) solutions offer standardized disaggregation of the RAN, decoupling hardware and software, to give CSPs more freedom of choice. Many organizations are looking to implement a container platform like Red Hat OpenShift that is ready to take on the intensive demands of this evolution for their RAN and for new 5G use cases, such as network slicing, IoT and industrial IoT. Moving to a cloud-native platform creates the opportunity for many of them to work with new suppliers, boost innovation and better differentiate using new operating models.

    Red Hat is excited to play a key role in this transformation. Last year, we shared the news of our expanded collaboration with Altiostar to develop an infrastructure and workload automation framework for a container-based RAN reference architecture that allows a consistent approach to a disaggregated RAN for both our customer and partner ecosystem. We’re now excited to build on this momentum by extending our architecture in collaboration with Mavenir, to transform mobile network infrastructures.

  • AIOps vs. MLOps: What's the difference?

    In late 2019, O'Reilly hosted a survey on artificial intelligence (AI) adoption in the enterprise. The survey broke respondents into two stages of adoption: Mature and Evaluation.

    When asked what's holding back their AI adoption, those in the latter category most often cited company culture. Trouble identifying good use cases for AI wasn't far behind.

  • Debuginfod project update: New clients and metrics - Red Hat Developer

    It’s been about a year since our last update about debuginfod, an HTTP file server that serves debugging resources to debugger-like tools. Since then, we’ve been busy integrating clients across a range of developer tools and improving the server’s available metrics. This article covers the features and improvements we’ve added to debuginfod since our last update.

    [...]

    Debuginfod is a part of the elfutils project. Tools that already use elfutils to find or analyze debugging resources automatically inherit debuginfod support. Tools like Systemtap, Libabigail, and dwgrep all inherit debuginfod this way. In Systemtap, for example, debuginfod offers new ways to specify which processes to probe. Previously, if you wanted to explore a running user process, you would have to provide either a process identifier (PID) or the executable path. With debuginfod, Systemtap can probe processes according to build-id, as well. So, it is possible to investigate specific versions of a binary independently from the location of the corresponding executable file.

    Debuginfod includes a client library (libdebuginfod) that lets other tools easily query debuginfod servers for source files, executables, and of course, debuginfo—generally, DWARF (debugging with attributed record format) debuginfo. Since last year, a variety of developer tools have integrated debuginfod clients. As of version 2.34, Binutils includes debuginfod support for its components that use separate debuginfo (readelf and objdump). Starting in version 9.03, the Annobin project contains debuginfod support for fetching separate debuginfo files, and support for Dyninst is planned in version 10.3.

  • Fedora Community Blog: A sneak peek at Fedora Zine

    So my Outreachy internship is winding to a close, as is the creation of the first-ever edition of our very own Fedora Zine!

    It has been a crazy journey so far and I have thoroughly enjoyed working on this awesome project, especially getting to see and work with all of these great submissions from the community. I have learned so much; from how to balance my design visually, how to pair fonts and use other typographic effects, how to use guides for a perfectly aligned design and also that you should read your printing specs very, very carefully before getting to work on a project.

Extending no-cost Red Hat Enterprise Linux to open source organizations

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Linux
Red Hat
OSS

Today, we’re announcing a new, no-cost program tailored for the needs and requirements of projects, foundations and more: Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) for Open Source Infrastructure. Joining a growing set of no-cost and low-cost programs, RHEL for Open Source Infrastructure provides a simpler, clearer and documented process for projects, communities, standards bodies and other not-for-profit software groups engaged with open source to gain access to RHEL subscriptions. While we plan to continue to refine this latest program, we wanted to outline what is available now for interested parties.

Read more

Also: Red Hat Announces Free "RHEL For Open-Source Infrastructure"

Christian Hergert: Sysprof and Podman

Filed under
Red Hat
GNOME

With the advent of immutable/re-provisional/read-only operating systems like Fedora’s Silverblue, people will be doing a lot more computing inside of containers on their desktops (as if they’re not already).

When you want to profile an entire system with tools like perf this can be problematic because the files that are mapped into memory could be coming from strange places like FUSE. In particular, fuse-overlayfs.

There doesn’t seem to be a good way to decode all this indirection which means in Sysprof, we’ve had broken ELF symbol decoding for your things running inside of podman containers (such as Fedora’s toolbox). For those of us who have to develop inside those containers, that can really be a drag.

The problem at the core is that Sysprof (and presumably other perf-based tooling) would think a file was mapped from somewhere like /usr/lib64/libglib-2.0.so according to the /proc/$pid/maps. Usually we translate that using /proc/$pid/mountinfo to the real mount or subvolume. But if fuse-overlayfs is in the picture, you don’t get any insight into that. When symbols are decoded, it looks at the host’s /usr/lib/libglib-2.0.so and finds an inode mismatch at which point it will stop trying to decode the instruction address.

Read more

Also: Adding a New Disk Device to Fedora Linux

IBM/Red Hat: Podman, OpenShift, Upselling Security, and Free Software Contributions

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Red Hat
  • 6 resources and 3 tips to help you enter the world of Linux containers

    Here are some tips, ideas, and resources to help you develop your container vocabulary and start working with this useful technology.

  • Bringing manufacturing to the edge with Red Hat OpenShift

    We are excited to announce today that Siemens is using Red Hat OpenShift to help its customers leverage the open hybrid cloud for edge deployments in the manufacturing industry. Let's take a look at why this is important for Siemens and why the approach is important for the industry at large.

    With Red Hat OpenShift for MindSphere, Siemens industrial IoT as a service solution, manufacturers will be able to run MindSphere across the hybrid cloud, including on-premise, for speed and agility in factory floor operations, as well as in the cloud for seamless product support, updates and enterprise connectivity. With MindSphere on Red Hat OpenShift, manufacturers will have control over factory floor data processed at the edge, as well as the agility and flexibility they require to meet expectations for higher quality products.

    [...]

    Red Hat OpenShift has long provided a control plane across the hybrid cloud but we have also focused efforts around updating OpenShift to better meet the unique needs of edge-specific deployments like Siemens'.

    A few of the latest edge related updates include three-node cluster support, which brings the capabilities of the industry’s leading enterprise Kubernetes platform to bear at the network’s edge in a smaller footprint. We’ve also added remote worker nodes.

    Remote worker nodes enable IT organizations to place single worker nodes in remote locations that can then be managed by centralized supervisor nodes at a larger site, such as a core or regional datacenter. This provides an additional topology choice to organizations pursuing Kubernetes innovation at the edge.

  • Defense in depth with Red Hat Insights

    Vulnerability and patch management can be time-consuming and painful. Standard practices for vulnerability management rely on scanning for vulnerabilities and rescanning to confirm that patches have been applied. Unfortunately, this can lead to false positives and can be time consuming. In this post we will discuss how Red Hat Insights complements vulnerability management processes by providing deeper visibility to the risks associated with vulnerabilities based on your environment.

    Not only does Red Hat Insights identify vulnerabilities but it prioritises them based on any mitigations already in place and gives immediate validation when a patch is applied. This additional validation can serve as defense in depth security strategy, as Insights helps you monitor policy, identify vulnerabilities and validate that appropriate mediations are in place remediation.

  • How your career goals can focus your open source contributions

    One of the quiet secrets of open source software projects is how much direct experience you can gain from domains and disciplines beyond software development. And the reverse is true—if you have non-developer skills and job experience, you are valuable to open source projects.

    There are relatively common forms that a contribution might end up taking when submitted to an open source project. We can examine from an outside perspective how your skills and career development goals map to these types of contributions.

    While conversation around technology sometimes focuses on the code and developers, it is a maxim of open source software projects that contribution is more than just code. This is evident when you study a project’s success holistically from within its ecosystem. A skilled project manager or user interface designer, for example, is just as likely as a software developer to provide the ideas and efforts behind a major success.

  • Scaling with partners in 2021: How partner momentum is driving Red Hat success

    Taking a page from Red Hat president and CEO, Paul Cormier’s post, I’d like to take a moment to recognize what the past year has meant for the partner ecosystem and where we go from here. Not for the first time, we heard Paul explain the importance of partners in Red Hat’s story:

    "The channel is what made Red Hat. Without our partner ecosystem, Red Hat would be a very different company."

    Partners are the connective tissue between Red Hat and customers. This has remained true throughout most of Red Hat’s history, this was true in 2020, and it will be our truth as we grow in 2021 together. Red Hat and our partners proved to be resilient this past year, but what stands out to me is the momentum fueled by partners in a time filled with uncertainty and challenges.

The 10 Best Red Hat-based Linux Distributions To Check Out in 2021

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Red Hat

Red Hat-based Linux distributions are shaping the industrial and corporate use of Linux for a long time. This project was quite popular since its initial release in 1995. Although later on, the developer company shut that down to start developing the successor named Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL). This commercial project is mainly for deployment in multi-processor systems and cluster computing.

RHEL is a commercial project with enterprise support from the Red Hat company. So, to utilize the power of Red Hat Linux more easily and affordably, the open-source community has come up with derivatives based on the Red Hat source. These distros provide much flexibility and customization options. They are quite reliable and stable as well to deploy on your organization.

Read more

Also: Custom policies in Red Hat 3scale API Management, Part 1: Overview - Red Hat Developer

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • New “How Do You Fedora” video series to interview members of the community

    A common answer to the question “What’s your favorite part about Fedora?” is often “the community”. Well, what’s so special about it?

    The Fedora community shares the common values of the “Four Foundations”: Freedom, Friends, Features and First. Beyond that, although there are many great minds, not all of them think alike! Everyone contributes different approaches to problems, interesting ideas, and diverse perspectives. There is a place in Fedora for anyone who wants to help.

    That’s why we’re launching a new video series on the Fedora Youtube channel profiling some of Fedora’s various contributors and how they use Fedora. The goal is to get to know some community members better, especially in a time where in-person community events might not be practical.

  • Sharing supplemental groups with Podman containers

    Rootless Podman containers is a really cool feature that allows users to run almost all containers in their home directory without requiring any additional privileges.

    Rootless containers take advantage of the user namespace, as I explained in this blog.

    Sometimes the user namespace and other container security layers like SELinux make it more difficult to share content inside the container. We have seen many users who want to share system directories into their containers but fail with permission errors. These directories are usually shared via some group access, which allows the user to read/write content in the directories.

  • Developer Diaries: The Case of the Miscoded Credentials

    Cloud development practices and environments are evolving faster than ever. As developers, we are no strangers to adapting to the changing technology landscape. However, with a landscape that changes this often, it’s easy for us to get caught using the techniques we’ve used in the past to create the applications of the future.

    In this video, we talk out a problem in Upkar’s code where a 505 error that occurred due to miscoded credentials and ultimately discuss how we tackle problems like these with some vital app modernization tools.

  • Introducing Red Hat Vulnerability Scanner Certification

    As container and Kubernetes adoption in production has grown, concerns regarding container security, monitoring, data management and networking remain. In order to address these challenges, organizations must lay a secure foundation for modern workloads. Red Hat is an established leader in security for enterprise open source solutions - container security is Linux security. Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Red Hat OpenShift offer a layered approach to securing containers and integrating security throughout the container lifecycle to support mission critical environments. We are continuously evolving to set new standards for security (e.g. DevSecOps) to support our partners and customers across open hybrid cloud.

    Today, we’re introducing the Red Hat Vulnerability Scanner Certification: a new certification to validate how security software partners use Red Hat security-related data for Red Hat products. This enables partners to deliver more reliable, consistent reporting to customers for containers to minimize false positives and other discrepancies. As a result, customers using Red Hat Certified partner security solutions can experience a more accurate process for assessing vulnerability risks of Red Hat products and packages including Red Hat Universal Base Images (UBI).

  • The history of open source risk reporting

    This year Red Hat released our 10th Product Security risk report, which reviews the vulnerabilities that affected our products during the previous year. Software, and our customers’ environments, have gotten more complex — and so has the IT security landscape.

    With so much information on Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVEs), our users have found it helpful to have one source of information about the risks posed to Red Hat technologies. And because Red Hat offers a full portfolio of technologies beyond Linux, we’ve expanded and improved the risk report to better reflect the issues that our customers care about. Now, let’s take a brief history lesson about how open source risk reporting has changed over the years.

  • Red Hat Software Now Available On IBM Power Systems

    IBM has announced availability of Red Hat software on IBM Power Systems as well as new IBM Power Systems hardware.

    IBM Power Systems now features Red Hat OpenShift on IBM Power Virtual Server leveraging OpenShift’s baremetal installeri, Red Hat Runtimes, and newly certified Red Hat Ansible Content Collections.

    Providing clients an optimized, production-level OpenShift platform to modernize traditional environments with cloud-native applications, the IBM Power Private Cloud Rack combines on-premises hardware, a complete software stack of IBM and Red Hat technology, and installation from IBM Systems Lab Services to deliver 49% lower cost per request as compared to similarly equipped x86-based platformsii.

    Today’s announcements include enhancements to IBM Power System’s capacity to scale compute capacity across the hybrid cloud on Linux, IBM i, and AIX.

Red Hat closes acquisition of StackRox

Filed under
Red Hat

Today, we are pleased to share that Red Hat has closed the transaction to acquire StackRox, a leader and innovator in container and Kubernetes-native security. Since announcing our plans for the acquisition, we have been met with excitement both internally and externally around what the future holds for Red Hat OpenShift as well as Red Hat’s entire open hybrid cloud portfolio.

According to 451 Research, "For those looking to secure complex environments, they need more than security features alone – there's a need for visibility across many environments, compliance management, threat detection, incident response, and much more."1 With StackRox’s Kubernetes-native security technology, Red Hat will be able to further expand its security leadership and reinforce our commitment to deliver a single, holistic platform for users to build, deploy and more securely run nearly any application across the hybrid cloud.

Over the past several years we have paid close attention to how our customers are securing their workloads, as well as the growing importance of GitOps to organizations. Both of these have reinforced how critically important it is for security to "shift left" - integrated within every part of the development and deployment lifecycle and not treated as an afterthought. With StackRox, we will be working to add security into container build and CI/CD processes. This helps to more efficiently identify and address issues earlier in the development cycle while providing more cohesive security up and down the entire IT stack and throughout the application lifecycle.

Read more

Racist IBM Starts LF PR Campaign to Claim It's Against Racism

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Red Hat
  • Two new Call for Code for Racial Justice projects just went open source [Ed: IBM has the audacity to claim to combat the very thing it has long contributed to]

    In response to the murders of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, and too many others, Call for Code for Racial Justice launched in October of 2020. The initiative provides developers with the opportunity to build open source solutions to address three focus areas: Police & Judicial Reform and Accountability, Diverse Representation, and Policy & Legislation Reform. The initiative builds upon Call for Code, which was created in 2018 and has grown to over 400,000 developers and problem-solvers across 179 countries, in partnership with Creator David Clark Cause, Founding Partner IBM, Charitable Partner United Nations Human Rights, and the Linux Foundation.

  • New Open Source Projects to Confront Racial Justice [Ed: Jason Perlow from IBM and Microsoft is trying to help IBM hide its highly racist practices, which it profited from]

    Today the Linux Foundation announced that it would be hosting seven projects that originated at Call for Code for Racial Justice, an initiative driven by IBM and Creator David Clark Cause to urge the global developer ecosystem and open source community to contribute to solutions that can help confront racial inequalities.

    Launched by IBM in October 2020, Call for Code for Racial Justice facilitates the adoption and innovation of open source projects by developers, ecosystem partners, and communities across the world to promote racial justice across three distinct focus areas: Police & Judicial Reform and Accountability; Diverse Representation; and Policy & Legislation Reform.

    The initiative builds upon Call for Code, created by IBM in 2018 and has grown to over 400,000 developers and problem solvers in 179 countries, in partnership with Creator David Clark Cause, Founding Partner IBM, Charitable Partner United Nations Human Rights, and the Linux Foundation.

  • The Linux Foundation and IBM Announce New Open Source Projects to Promote Racial Justice
  • The Linux Foundation and IBM Announce New Open Source Projects to Promote Racial Justice

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced it will host seven projects from Call for Code for Racial Justice, an initiative driven by IBM and Creator David Clark Cause to urge the global developer ecosystem and open source community to contribute to solutions that can help confront racial inequalities.

    Call for Code for Racial Justice launched in October 2020, and facilitates the adoption and innovation of open source projects by developers, ecosystem partners, and communities across the world to promote racial justice across three focus areas: Police & Judicial Reform and Accountability; Diverse Representation; and Policy & Legislation Reform. The initiative builds upon Call for Code, which was created in 2018 and has grown to over 400,000 developers and problem solvers across 179 countries, in partnership with Creator David Clark Cause, Founding Partner IBM, Charitable Partner United Nations Human Rights, and the Linux Foundation.

    “Open source technology has an important role to play in addressing the greatest challenges of our time, and that includes racial justice,” said Mike Dolan, senior vice president and GM of Projects at the Linux Foundation. “We are excited to host and support these projects at the Linux Foundation, and look forward to how they will develop and deploy through contributions from the open source community.”

Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Remi Collet: PHP version 7.4.16RC1 and 8.0.3RC1

    Release Candidate versions are available in testing repository for Fedora and Enterprise Linux (RHEL / CentOS) to allow more people to test them. They are available as Software Collections, for a parallel installation, perfect solution for such tests, and also as base packages.

    RPM of PHP version 8.0.3RC1 are available as SCL in remi-test repository and as base packages in the remi-php80-test repository for Fedora 32-34 and Enterprise Linux.

    RPM of PHP version 7.4.16RC1 are available as SCL in remi-test repository and as base packages in the remi-test repository for Fedora 32-34 or remi-php74-test repository for Enterprise Linux.

  • Why every job in the tech industry is technical

    Several years ago, I applied for a marketing job at a tech company. I got called back for the phone screening and had a delightful conversation with the recruiter. The next day, I got an email from the recruiter saying that I was not “technical” enough to move forward to the next round of interviews. I was shocked.

    I had always been the one my colleagues would call on for technical help and feedback. Understanding and using technology came naturally to me. By that point in my career, I had become even more proficient and technical within my specialty. So how could the recruiter think that I am not “technical”?

    I wrote a letter to the recruiter explaining why the hiring manager should not dismiss me just yet. Sure, I did not have experience in the tech industry (I had always worked for companies in consumer goods and retail), but isn’t every company a software company these days? I also wanted to alleviate any concerns about my lack of coding abilities. Between managing website migrations, blog redesigns, product merchandising, and fixing that annoying indent on a particularly finicky landing page, I felt that I had that “in the weeds” troubleshooting practice similar to that of a programmer.

  • Máirín Duffy: User Experience (UX) + Free Software = ❤

    Let’s talk about a topic that is increasingly critical as time goes on, that is really important for those of us who work on free software and care really deeply about making a positive impact in the world. Let’s talk about user experience (UX) and free software, using the ChRIS Project as a case study.

  • Kinoite: Immutable Fedora variant with KDE Plasma desktop on the way

    Red Hat's Fedora project is to add a new variant called Kinoite, an immutable desktop operating system alongside the existing Silverblue, which runs GNOME desktop.

    The idea behind an immutable operating system is that it is mounted read-only; also, conceptually, it is not patched but rather is replaced when it needs to be updated, in the same way as a container. This has obvious security advantages, as well as making features like rollback easier to implement.

    Silverblue was introduced in early 2018 based in part on an earlier project called Atomic Host. The first full release of Silverblue was as part of Fedora 29 in October 2018. Fedora CoreOS, designed for hosting containers, is also designed as an immutable operating system. Both CoreOS and Silverblue are presented as "emerging Fedora editions" rather than mainstream, and Fedora itself is the leading-edge Linux distribution from Red Hat, unlike Red Hat Enterprise Linux, which emphasises stability for production.

  • Why The Founder Of CentOS Is Building The Next Platform

    Greg Kurtzer, one of the co-founders of the CentOS Linux distribution, the creator of the Singularity container environment for HPC workloads, the founder of the new Rocky Linux distribution that seeks to replace the now defunct CentOS, and an HPC guru in his own right, is on a mission. And it is a mission that we admire and see all the time: To build an integrated application platform that radically removes the complexity of modern distributed computing without dumbing it down.

    This is a very hard thing to do, and Kurtzer knows this full well, even though he comes at it from a slightly oblique angle.

    Kurtzer is a funny guy, even if the work he has done is deadly serious. By his own admission, he wandered a bit in college, studying mechanical engineering, music, and pre-med before getting a bachelor’s of science in biochemistry in 1997 from what he refers to as the “Northern California Chicken Grooming School,” adding that “you might think I am indecisive, but I am not so sure.” (That is presumably the University of California at Berkeley, one of the major hotbeds of computer hardware and software architecture in the world.) Kurtzer did work at a biotech firm doing genomics work after graduation, and then landed a job as a software engineer at Linuxcare, one of a zillion Linux distros, just before the dot-com boom went bust in late 2000.

  • Influential women

    When people ask me about success engaging women in some of the mentoring programs for free, open source software, I never feel comfortable taking credit for that. I feel that it comes down to one simple thing: collaborating with a number of successful and influential women in a variety of different places. Today is the tenth anniversary of the passing of Sally Shaw. Sally had made monumental contributions to the success of the Yarra Yarra Rowing Club (YYRC), even while fighting cancer, raising a family and managing projects for IBM.

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat

  • Getting started with the OpenShift Platform Developer learning path

    When I started as a Red Hat consultant a few years ago, I had limited prior knowledge of containers. I was excited to learn about Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform but also intimidated by all its functionality. The Red Hat OpenShift Platform Developer learning path was very helpful in my journey, and this post will outline some of these resources to help you get started.

    While we’re going to focus on the Red Hat OpenShift Platform Developer learning path, you should know that there are two major Red Hat OpenShift learning paths. Both paths are relevant for delivery teams, consultants, and solution architects

  •  

  • Introducing the technology preview of IBM API Hub on IBM Developer

    Developers have always been on the front lines of digital transformation, but the past year has given rise to a new urgency to become a digital business.

    With developers having trillions of programmable endpoints available to be connected to and to realize new capabilities, the role of APIs in open hybrid cloud work is poised to grow exponentially. An IDC FutureScape report about Worldwide Developer and DevOps 2021 predictions stated that in the next few years, the “reuse of third-party code in new apps and digital solutions” will double by 2024.

    Access to trusted, secure API-enabled services and the data allow you to innovate with velocity and transform and modernize your hybrid cloud solutions.

  •  

  • Fedora Community Blog: Fedora Community Outreach Revamp Update #4

    As of January 2021 the Revamp is now a Fedora Objective! With the Fedora Council approving the objective after community feedback, the Revamp becomes a medium-term goal of the Council. The co-leads of the Revamp, Mariana Balla and Sumantro Mukherjee, are Council members through the completion of the objective. We will provide updates on the Community Outreach Revamp at the regular Council meetings. More details about the Community Outreach Revamp as an Objective can be found on the wiki page.

  •   

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More in Tux Machines

Free Software Leftovers

  • From Clean & Green Mockup to OpenBSD cwm(1) desktop

    If the words CGA or Hercules raise sweet memories from your far away youth, the Mockup Clean & Green from u/awareofdistractions may hit you right in the heart. And if you like it so much, it may be used for real-life desktop environment using OpenBSD stock and ports material.

  • Learning more about our users

    At the Tor Project we practice user-centered design. This means we put our users at the heart of our development process, making a conscious effort to understand the contexts in which people use our tools and paying particular attention to the bumps they encounter along the way.

    Many digital product companies rely heavily on data gathered from invasive tracking scripts to better understand their users’ behavior, further fueling the surveillance economy. However that’s not how we do things at Tor – instead, we aim to conduct research that respects the basic principles of privacy and consent.

  • New Release: Tor Browser 10.5a11

    Tor Browser 10.5a11 is now available from the Tor Browser Alpha download page and also from our distribution directory.

    Note: This is an alpha release, an experimental version for users who want to help us test new features. For everyone else, we recommend downloading the latest stable release instead.

  • FSFE20 +++ IloveFS +++ Job vacancy

    In our February Newsletter, we interview our founding president Georg Greve as part of our publication series to celebrate 20 Years FSFE, we reflect on I love Free Software Day and our FOSDEM participation, we advertise our new job vacancy and as usual we report on our diverse community activities.

  • Keeping platforms open

    My previous article, Whatsapp and the domestication of users, got more attention than I was expecting. Some responses gave me a lot to think about,1 especially regarding actions we can take. I suggest reading that article first; it explained what “user domestication” is and why it’s a problem. It enumerated three countermeasures: FOSS, simplicity, and open platforms.

    Hard problems, by definition, lack easy solutions. Simply choosing (or creating) a platform that avoids user domestication isn’t enough if that platform can change. The price of freedom is eternal vigilance; in addition to settling on the right platform, we must ensure that it honors its users in both the present and the future. Keeping a platform FOSS and simple is more straightforward2 than keeping a platform “open”.

    How do we keep an open platform from becoming a closed platform in the future?

Programming Leftovers

  • 6 Top Data Analysis Tools for Big Data

    Big Data is an all-inclusive term that refers to data sets so large and complex that they need to be processed by specially designed hardware and software tools. The data sets are typically of the order of tera or exabytes in size. These data sets are created from a diverse range of sources: sensors that gather climate information, publicly available information such as magazines, newspapers, articles. Other examples where big data is generated include purchase transaction records, web logs, medical records, military surveillance, video and image archives, and large-scale e-commerce. There is a heightened interest in Big Data and Big Data analysis and the implications they have for businesses. Big Data analysis is the process of examining huge quantities of data to find patterns, correlations, and other useful information that can help firms become more responsive to change, and to make better informed decisions. Big Data analysis can be performed with data mining software. However, the unstructured data sources used for big data analysis are not necessarily suitable for investigation by traditional data mining software.

  • 50 Years of Pascal

    Pascal was easy to teach, and it covered a wide spectrum of applications, which was a significant advantage over Algol, Fortran, and Cobol. The Pascal System was efficient, compact, and easy to use. The language was strongly influenced by the new discipline of structured programming, advocated primarily by E.W. Dijkstra to avert the threatening software crisis (1968).

  • How to use Django Serializers – Linux Hint

    Serializer is used in Django to convert the model instances or querysets into python supported data types that can be easily rendered into JSON, XML, or other formats. The deserialization can also be done by serializers to get back the original data from the serialized data. This feature is available in Django REST Framework. So, the users have to install this framework to use the serializers. Any webpage of the website may contain HTML, CSS, and data from the database tables. But the API does not understand these types of content, and it can understand the raw data only, that is, JSON data. How the serializers can be used to convert the model instance into JSON format has shown in this tutorial.

  • How to use queryset in django – Linux Hint

    Most of the web applications are implemented with the database now. queryset is used in the Django application to retrieve records by filtering or slicing or ordering the database table without changing the original data. The model used Django to create the table in the database. So, the knowledge of using the model in Django is necessary to understand the use of queryset. The main function of the queryset is to iterate the records of database tables by converting them into SQL queries. It can be used from the python command line or by writing the python script to display the browser’s output. The uses of queryset for retrieving data from a database table in different ways have been explained in this tutorial.

  • This Week In Rust: This Week in Rust 379 [Ed: The usual paradox of developing "openly" while requiring people to get an account with Microsoft and then use proprietary software of Microsoft, which attacks Free software.]

    This Week in Rust is openly developed on GitHub.

  • What Is BC in a Bash Script? – Linux Hint

    BC, which stands for Basic Calculator, is a command in Bash that is used to provide the functionality of a scientific calculator within a Bash script. This can be useful for scripting with various arithmentic use cases and scenarios. This article shows you how to use BC in a Bash script.

Security Leftovers

  • How often should I rotate my ssh keys?

    My story for today is about ssh and how even public keys, while much better than simple passwords, are still not a perfect solution.

    The danger is credential theft, which is a fancy way of saying “someone stole your private keys.” Back in the 1990s, that problem was pretty far from our minds; Windows 98 didn’t even have the concept of a separate administrator account, never mind the idea of app sandboxing or the inkling that someone might intentionally want to load malware onto your computer and encrypt all your files for ransomware. Those were the days when some people thought ActiveX controls (essentially loading .exe files from web sites) might be a good idea. Actually, maybe even a great idea as long as there was an “are you sure?” dialog box first.

  • 4 of the Best LastPass Alternatives

    LastPass has recently changed its free account usage policy to be only available on one device, and a lot of its users are not happy about it. If you are a LastPass Free user and are looking to switch, here are four great LastPass alternatives you should check out. These services reserve their pricing tiers for more advanced, business-oriented users while still leaving free users with a powerful set of features to safeguard their online accounts data.

  • Security updates for Thursday

    Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (ansible-base, keycloak, mumble, and postgresql), Debian (firefox-esr and nodejs), Fedora (dotnet3.1, dotnet5.0, keylime, php-horde-Horde-Text-Filter, radare2, scap-security-guide, and wireshark), openSUSE (postgresql, postgresql13 and python-djangorestframework), Red Hat (Ansible, firefox, and thunderbird), Scientific Linux (firefox and thunderbird), SUSE (php7, postgresql-jdbc, python-cryptography, rpmlint, and webkit2gtk3), and Ubuntu (dnsmasq, linux, linux-aws, linux-aws-5.4, linux-azure, linux-azure-5.4, linux-gcp, linux-gcp-5.4, linux-gke-5.4, linux-gkeop, linux-gkeop-5.4, linux-hwe-5.4, linux-kvm, linux-oracle, linux-oracle-5.4, linux-raspi, linux-raspi-5.4, linux, linux-aws, linux-aws-hwe, linux-azure, linux-azure-4.15, linux-dell300x, linux-gcp, linux-gcp-4.15, linux-gke-4.15, linux-hwe, linux-kvm, linux-oracle, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon, linux, linux-aws, linux-azure, linux-gcp, linux-hwe-5.8, linux-kvm, linux-oracle, linux-raspi, linux, linux-aws, linux-kvm, linux-lts-xenial, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon, linux-oem-5.10, linux-oem-5.6, screen, and xterm).

  • Biden signs executive order calling for semiconductor supply chain review

    President Biden signed an executive order Wednesday addressing growing concern over a global semiconductor shortage hampering the production of goods like automobiles and smartphones.

    The White House’s executive order directs the federal government to conduct 100-day reviews of supply chains in four sets of products, including computer chips and large capacity batteries, like those used in electric vehicles, according to administration officials.

  • Biden Orders Review to Shore Up Supply Chain Resiliency

    On top of the 100-day review of the four key industries, Biden’s order will also direct yearlong reviews for six sectors: defense, public health, information technology, transportation, energy and food production.

    Biden said his administration will implement the recommendations as soon as they are available. “We're not going to wait for the review to be completed before we start closing the existing gaps,” he said.

  • Technology Executives Say All Evidence Points To Russia In Major Hack Of Computer Networks

    Smith told the committee that the true scope of the intrusions is still unknown because most victims are not legally required to disclose attacks unless they involve sensitive information about individuals.

  • Finnish IT Giant Hit with Ransomware Cyberattack [iophk: Windows TO]

    Norwegian business journal E24 reported the attack on Espoo, Finland-based TietoEVRY on Tuesday, claiming to have spoken with Geir Remman, a communications director at the company. Remman acknowledged technical problems with several services that TietoEVRY provides to 25 customers, which are “due to a ransom attack,” according to the report.

    Remman told E24 that the company considers the attack “a serious criminal act.” TietoEVRY turned off the unspecified services and infrastructure affected “as a preventative measure” until it can recover relevant data, and restart systems “in a controlled manner,” he said.

Ubuntu Leftovers

  • Ubuntu Aims For Higher Quality LTS Point Releases - Phoronix

    New restrictions will be in place beginning with Ubuntu 20.04.3 LTS this summer to try to enforce better quality releases with less regressions by enforcing better quality control. The change beginning with Ubuntu 20.04.3 LTS will require that stable release update (SRU) procedures are followed even for release blockers. This will require that every fix follows the same verification, regression analysis, and aging period process. The tighter quality controls will likely lead to slips in release targets if bugs are found in the release candidates for new point releases, as it will first need to go through the verification and aging process.

  • DFI Partners With Ubuntu For IoT Hardware, OTA Updates - Phoronix

    Most of you probably haven't heard of DFI much in nearly two decades since the days of their colorful "LanParty" motherboards that were well known at the time, but these days they are focused on the industrial computer industry and have now teamed up with Canonical to partake in the Ubuntu IoT Hardware Certification Partner Program. DFI is the first industrial computer vendor joining the Ubuntu IoT Hardware Certification Partner Program for Ubuntu-certified hardware focused on the Internet of Things and embracing over-the-air software updates.

  • What is MEC ? The telco edge.

    MEC, as ETSI defines it, stands for Multi-access Edge Computing and is sometimes referred to as Mobile edge computing. MEC is a solution that gives content providers and software developers cloud-computing capabilities which are close to the end users. This micro cloud deployed in the edge of mobile operators’ networks has ultra low latency and high bandwidth which enables new types of applications and business use cases. On top of that an application running on MEC can have real-time access to a subset of radio network information that can improve the overall experience.