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Red Hat

Red Hat's Patent Pledge, Openwashing, and Imminent Positive Results

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Red Hat
  • Red Hat expands its pioneering patent promise to the open source community

    Open source software business Red Hat this morning announced a big expansion of its patent promise, its commitment to not assert its patents against free and open source software which it launched in 2002. The expansion of the promise means that it now extends to all of Red Hat’s patents and so offers further defensive cover to the open source community.

    Red Hat claims that the new promise is significantly broader than the original agreement with the new version covering more than 99% of open source software compared with 35% for the original. The new promise also specifically covers permissive licences which, in recent years, have over taken copyleft licences as the most popular type of open source agreement.

  • Red Hat’s Patent Promise covers permissively-licensed code, offering broad protection for open innovation

    Red Hat announced on Thursday a significant revision of its Patent Promise, helping to protect open innovation. That promise, originating in 2002, was based on Red Hat’s intention not to enforce its patents against free and open source software.

    The expanded Patent Promise, while consistent with Red Hat’s prior positions, breaks new ground in expanding the amount of software covered and otherwise clarifying the scope of the promise. Red Hat believes its updated Patent Promise represents the broadest commitment to protecting the open source software community to date.

  • Red Hat Announces Broad Expansion to Open Source Patent Promise [Ed: Red Hat should toss out all the software patents, in case of takeover]

    Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced a significant revision of its Patent Promise. That promise, originating in 2002, was based on Red Hat’s intention not to enforce its patents against free and open source software. The new version significantly expands and extends Red Hat’s promise, helping to protect open innovation.

    In its original Patent Promise, Red Hat explained that its patent portfolio was intended to discourage patent aggression against free and open source software. The expanded version published today reaffirms this intention and extends the zone of non-enforcement. It applies to all of Red Hat’s patents, and all software licensed under well-recognized open source licenses.

    The expanded Patent Promise, while consistent with Red Hat’s prior positions, breaks new ground in expanding the amount of software covered and otherwise clarifying the scope of the promise. Red Hat believes its updated Patent Promise represents the broadest commitment to protecting the open source software community to date.

  • How 10,000 people helped us rediscover our purpose [Ed: Red Hat openwashing again]
  • Red Hat (RHT) to Report Q2 Earnings: Will it Beat Estimates?

Flock 2017, Fedora 27, and New Fedora 26 (F26) ISO

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Red Hat
  • Flock 2017: How to make your application into a Flatpak?
  • Flock to Fedora 2017
  • Flock 2017 – A Marketing talk about a new era to come.

    I had two session at Flock this year, one done by me and another in support of Robert Mayr in the Mindshare one, if there were been any need for discussing.
    Here I’m talking about my session: Marketing – tasks and visions (I will push the report about the second one after Robert’s one, for completion).

    In order to fit the real target of a Flock conference (that is a contributor conference, not a show where people must demonstrate how much cool they are; we know it!) is to bring and show something new, whether ideas, software, changes and so on, and discuss with other contributors if they’re really innovative, useful and achievable.

  • F26-20170918 Updated Live isos released
  • GSoC2017 Final — Migrate Plinth to Fedora Server
  • Building Modules for Fedora 27

    Let me start with a wrong presumption that you have everything set up – you are a packager who knows what they want to achieve, you have a dist-git repository created, you have all the tooling installed. And of course, you know what Modularity is, and how and why do we use modulemd to define modular content. You know what Host, Platform, and Bootstrap modules are and how to use them.

The Red Hat Way

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Red Hat
  • Red Hat wants to make cold-shouldered OpenStack red hot

    At OpenStack Summit in Boston last May, some speculated that the event might be the last gasp for OpenStack — an open-source platform for cloud computing and infrastructure-as-service. Granted, OpenStack was one of the less hyped open-source projects of the past year. But renewed community and end-user interest is breathing fresh life into the platform, according to Rob Young (pictured), senior manager of virtualization product and strategy at Red Hat Inc.

    Telcos and others are adopting OpenStack “because of the simplification of what was once complex, but also in the cost savings that can be realized by managing your own cloud within a hybrid cloud environment,” Young said.

  • Improved multimedia support with Pipewire in Fedora 27

    Pipewire — a new project of underlying Linux infrastructure to handle multimedia better — has just been officially launched. The project’s main goal is to improve the handling of both audio and video. Additionally, Pipewire introduces a security model to allow easy interaction with multimedia devices from containerized and sandboxed applications, i.e. Flatpak apps.

  • Architecting the future with abstractions and metadata

    The modern data center is built on abstractions, with Docker, Kubernetes, and OpenShift leading the way.

Red Hat News

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Red Hat

Red Hat and Fedora: AnsibleFest SF 2017, So-called 'Open Organisation', and Pipewire

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Red Hat
  • AnsibleFest SF 2017

    AnsibleFest was amazing, it always is. This has been my Third one and it's always one that I look forward to attending. The Ansible Events Team does an absolutely stellar job of putting things together and I'm extremely happy I was not only able to attend but that I was accepted as a speaker.

  • The eye-opening power of cultural difference

    Inclusivity is the quality of an open organization that allows and encourages people to join the organization and feel a connection to it. Practices aimed at enhancing inclusivity are typically those that welcome new participants to the organization and create an environment that makes them want to stay.

    When we talk about inclusivity, we should clarify something: Being "inclusive" is not the same as being "diverse." Diversity is a product of inclusivity; you need to create an inclusive community in order to become a diverse one, not the other way around. The degree to which your open organization is inclusive determines how it adapts to, responds to, and embraces diversity in order to improve itself. Interestingly enough, the best way to know which organizational changes will make your group more inclusive is to interact with the people you want to join your community.

  • Red Hat (RHT) PT Raised to $120 at Barclays Into Q2 Print
  • Barclays Holds To Rating And Raises Price Target On Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) Volatility in Focus
  • Share Activity Lifted for Red Hat Inc (RHT) in Session
  • Red Hat Formally Rolls Out Pipewire For Being The "Video Equivalent of PulseAudio"

    Red Hat has quietly been working on PipeWire for years that is like the "video equivalent of PulseAudio" while now it's ready to make its initial debut in Fedora 27 and the project now has an official website.

    Pipewire has been talked about a few times in recent months while Red Hat's Christian Schaller wrote a blog post today about Launching Pipewire!

Launching Pipewire! (Fedora)

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Red Hat
Software

To give you all some background, Pipewire is the latest creation of GStreamer co-creator Wim Taymans. The original reason it was created was that we realized that as desktop applications would be moving towards primarly being shipped as containerized Flatpaks we would need something for video similar to what PulseAudio was doing for Audio. As part of his job here at Red Hat Wim had already been contributing to PulseAudio for a while, including implementing a new security model for PulseAudio to ensure we could securely have containerized applications output sound through PulseAudio. So he set out to write Pipewire, although initially the name he used was PulseVideo. As he was working on figuring out the core design of PipeWire he came to the conclusion that designing Pipewire to just be able to do video would be a mistake as a major challenge he was familiar with working on GStreamer was how to ensure perfect audio and video syncronisation. If both audio and video could be routed through the same media daemon then ensuring audio and video worked well together would be a lot simpler and frameworks such as GStreamer would need to do a lot less heavy lifting to make it work. So just before we starting sharing the code publicaly we renamed the project to Pinos, named after Pinos de Alhaurín, a small town close to where Wim is living in southern Spain. In retrospect Pinos was probably not the worlds best name

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Also: Bodhi 2.11.0 released

Red Hat, Fedora/Flock, and Financial News

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Red Hat

Red Hat: Oracle's Clone, GNU Work (GCC), Finance and Fedora

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Red Hat

CentOS 7.4 Is Now Available for 64-Bit, ARM64, ARMhfp, POWER7 & POWER8 Machines

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OS
Red Hat

CentOS developers Karanbir Singh and Jim Perrin announced the release of the CentOS 7.4 operating system for supported architectures, a release that brings all the latest updates and security patches.

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More in Tux Machines

Chromium and Firefox: New Features

  • Chromebook Owners Will Soon Be Able to Monitor CPU and RAM Usage in Real-Time
    Chromium evangelist François Beaufort announced today that Google's Chrome OS engineers have managed to implement a new feature that will let Chromebook owners monitor the CPU usage, RAM, and zRam statistics in real-time. The feature was implemented in the Chrome Canary experimental channel and can be easily enabled by opening the Google Chrome web browser and accessing the chrome://flags/#sys-internals flag. There you'll be able to monitor your Chromebook's hardware and see what's eating your memory or CPU during heavy workloads, all in real-time. "Chrome OS users can monitor in real-time their CPU usage, memory and zRam statistics thanks to the new internal page chrome://sys-internals in the latest Canary," said François Beaufort in a Google+ post. "For that, enable the experimental chrome://flags/#sys-internals flag, restart Chrome, and enjoy watching real-time resource consumption."
  • Tracking Protection for Firefox for iOS Plus Multi-Tasking in Focus for Android New Today
    Across the industry, September is always an exciting month in mobile, and the same is true here at Mozilla. Today, we’re launching the newest Firefox for iOS alongside an update for the popular Firefox Focus for Android, which we launched in June.

Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) Is Now Powered by Linux Kernel 4.13, GCC 7.2

Greg Kroah-Hartman published on Wednesday new maintenance updates for various of the supported Linux kernel branches that he maintains, including the Linux 4.12 series, which appears to have reached end of life. Read more

The ISS just got its own Linux supercomputer

A year-long project to determine how high-performance computers can perform in space has just cleared a major hurdle -- successfully booting up on the International Space Station (ISS). This experiment conducted by Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) and NASA aims to run a commercial off-the-shelf high-performance computer in the harsh conditions of space for one year -- roughly the amount of time it will take to travel to Mars. Read more

Qt 5.6.3 Released

I am pleased to inform that Qt 5.6.3 has been released today. As always with a patch release Qt 5.6.3 does not bring any new features, just error corrections. For details of the bug fixes in Qt 5.6.3, please check the change logs for each module. Read more