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Fedora and IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Fedora Community Blog: Friday’s Fedora Facts: 2021-37

    Here’s your weekly Fedora report. Read what happened this week and what’s coming up. Your contributions are welcome (see the end of the post)!

    I have weekly office hours on Wednesdays in the morning and afternoon (US/Eastern time) in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else. See the upcoming meetings for more information.

  • Red Hat Is Hiring So Linux Can Finally Have Good HDR Display Support - Phoronix

    One of the areas where Linux has struggled on the desktop has been around HDR (high dynamic range) display support while that will hopefully be addressed in the coming months with Red Hat hiring an engineer to focus on that problem.

    Linux has struggled for years with HDR display support while NVIDIA has worked on the problem for their proprietary driver stack and proposing a DeepColor Visual extension for X.Org, there has been some HDR work in the DRM code, work by Intel on HDR support for Wayland/Weston along with other Intel HDR driver work, and AMD driver work too.

  • Changes to Bugzilla queries

    On 13 September 2021, Red Hat’s Bugzilla team released updates to Bugzilla that included new functionality for pagination. There is also a change to the default number of results with the bug search API to support this feature. The default is now 20 but can be adjusted to 1000 by using the limit/offset parameters.

    [...]

    The default Bug search API(REST/XMLRPC/JSONRPC) result in 20 bugs by default and users can change this by specifying the limit. The value of limit can be up to 1000 bugs. If you need results that are more than 1000, you can use the offset parameter. You can get default 1000 bugs by sending 0 as a limit parameter.

    Additionally, they have introduced “total_matches”, “limit”, and “offset” values in the response. These give the total number of bugs qualified for the query and the number of results in the response.

  • Monitoring vs. observability: What's the difference in DevOps? | The Enterprisers Project

    As software delivery becomes more complex and organizations work to scale their DevOps transformations, the need for observability increases. While observability plays an important role in any DevOps journey, it is often confused with monitoring. Although both are typically discussed in the same context, they are not one and the same.

    To help establish a clear picture, I asked SKILup Day participants and DevOps Institute ambassadors to clarify some of the key differences.

  • IT leadership: 3 lessons in failure, (im)patience, and teamwork | The Enterprisers Project

    Becoming a leader of a team or an organization isn’t something you simply wake up and do. It’s an evolution. It starts with “leading” yourself and driving yourself to make an impact toward a mission – toward something bigger than yourself. It takes relentless focus and passion.

    I’ve learned a lot of lessons over the years – sometimes by doing it right, sometimes by doing it wrong. Here are three that I keep coming back to.

  • The service provider edge: Building the case for an open source approach

    We’ve previously outlined the role of service providers in edge technology innovation and how constructing a robust ecosystem of partners multiply the opportunities to maximize functional and business opportunities while mitigating risk and investment.

    In order to support a broad variety of use cases spanning multiple industries, edge computing requires collaboration across suppliers, service providers and application and content partners. Additionally, with widely distributed networks and physical presence, they remain uniquely positioned to deploy edge computing infrastructures that are close to the user and tightly integrated with transport and access networks.

    The explosion and permutations of end-points, mobile applications, and distributed computing drives this need — all while meeting demanding functionality and quality of service expectations.

    How might the rapidly changing edge technology landscape benefit from the adaptability provided by open source solutions?

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Camel K Brings Apache Camel to Kubernetes for Event-Driven Architectures – The New Stack

    Applications have increasingly relied on event-driven architectures (EDAs) in recent years, especially with the advent of serverless and microservices. EDAs decouple an event from the subsequent actions that may follow, as opposed to traditional linear architectures, where an event might be processed in that same code. This decoupling makes EDA processes able to be independently scaled and, while EDA does not strictly require microservices or serverless, the respective loose coupling and the on-demand nature is a perfect fit.

    In the cloud native world, the focus might often be on the serverless side of things, with Knative or Lambda taking the spotlight, but, as the name might imply, event-driven architecture is nothing without events. Apache Camel K takes Apache Camel, the fundamental piece of enterprise integration software that first came around as a sort of codification of the 2003 book Enterprise Integration Patterns, and brings it to Kubernetes, providing EDA with a multitude of event sources, explained Keith Babo, Director of Product Management at Red Hat.

  • Automated Live - A Red Hat video collection

    Watch Colin and his trusty tech guru Sean discuss how the Red Hat® Ansible® Automation Platform can help improve your business processes and scale for the future.

  • Shenandoah in OpenJDK 17: Sub-millisecond GC pauses | Red Hat Developer

    Our primary motivation for the Shenandoah OpenJDK garbage collection (GC) project is to reduce garbage collection pause times. In JDK 12, we released the original Shenandoah garbage collector, which implements concurrent heap evacuation, which solved the major problem of cleaning (potentially large) heaps without stopping the application. This version was eventually backported to JDK 11. In JDK 14, we implemented concurrent class unloading, and in JDK 16, we added concurrent reference processing, both of which further reduced pause times in those garbage collection operations. The remaining garbage collection operation under pause was thread-stack processing, which we've solved in JDK 17.

    This article introduces the new concurrent thread-stack processing in Shenandoah GC. Processing thread stacks concurrently gives us reliable sub-millisecond pauses in JDK 17.

  • Applying DevSecOps practices to Kubernetes: security analysis and remediation

    This post explores implementing DevSecOps principles to improve Kubernetes security analysis and remediation across the full development life cycle.

  • The Enterprisers Project's 8th anniversary: What's next for CIO role? | The Enterprisers Project

    At the Enterprisers Project, we have a clear mission: Help CIOs and IT leaders solve problems. That means not only the technology challenges but also the leadership and career varieties. Our IT leadership community succeeds largely because of all your generosity – in sharing real-world lessons learned with your peers. And what unparalleled lessons they were in 2021.

Christian F.K. Schaller: Cool happenings in Fedora Workstation land

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Red Hat

Been some time since my last update, so I felt it was time to flex my blog writing muscles again and provide some updates of some of the things we are working on in Fedora in preparation for Fedora Workstation 35. This is not meant to be a comprehensive whats new article about Fedora Workstation 35, more of a listing of some of the things we are doing as part of the Red Hat desktop team.

NVidia support for Wayland
One thing we spent a lot of effort on for a long time now is getting full support for the NVidia binary driver under Wayland. It has been a recurring topic in our bi-weekly calls with the NVidia engineering team ever since we started looking at moving to Wayland. There has been basic binary driver support for some time, meaning you could run a native Wayland session on top of the binary driver, but the critical missing piece was that you could not get support for accelerated graphics when running applications through XWayland, our X.org compatibility layer. Which basically meant that any application requiring 3D support and which wasn’t a native Wayland application yet wouldn’t work. So over the last Months we been having a great collaboration with NVidia around closing this gap, with them working closely with us in fixing issues in their driver while we have been fixing bugs and missing pieces in the rest of the stack. We been reporting and discussing issues back and forth allowing us a very quickly turnaround on issues as we find them which of course all resulted in the NVidia 470.42.01 driver with XWayland support. I am sure we will find new corner cases that needs to be resolved in the coming Months, but I am equally sure we will be able to quickly resolve them due to the close collaboration we have now established with NVidia. And I know some people will wonder why we spent so much time working with NVidia around their binary driver, but the reality is that NVidia is the market leader, especially in the professional Linux workstation space, and there are lot of people who either would end up not using Linux or using Linux with X without it, including a lot of Red Hat customers and Fedora users. And that is what I and my team are here for at the end of the day, to make sure Red Hat customers are able to get their job done using their Linux systems.

Lightweight kiosk mode
One of the wonderful things about open source is the constant flow of code and innovation between all the different parts of the ecosystem. For instance one thing we on the RHEL side have often been asked about over the last few years is a lightweight and simple to use solution for people wanting to run single application setups, like information boards, ATM machines, cash registers, information kiosks and so on. For many use cases people felt that running a full GNOME 3 desktop underneath their application was either to resource hungry and or created a risk that people accidentally end up in the desktop session. At the same time from our viewpoint as a development team we didn’t want a completely separate stack for this use case as that would just increase our maintenance burden as we would end up having to do a lot of things twice. So to solve this problem Ray Strode spent some time writing what we call GNOME Kiosk mode which makes setting up a simple session running single application easy and without running things like the GNOME shell, tracker, evolution etc. This gives you a window manager with full support for the latest technologies such as compositing, libinput and Wayland, but coming in at about 18MB, which is about 71MB less than a minimal GNOME 3 desktop session. You can read more about the new Kiosk mode and how to use it in this great blog post from our savvy Edge Computing Product Manager Ben Breard. The kiosk mode session described in Ben’s article about RHEL will be available with Fedora Workstation 35.

Read more

Cool happenings in Fedora Workstation land

Filed under
Red Hat

Been some time since my last update, so I felt it was time to flex my blog writing muscles again and provide some updates of some of the things we are working on in Fedora in preparation for Fedora Workstation 35. This is not meant to be a comprehensive whats new article about Fedora Workstation 35, more of a listing of some of the things we are doing as part of the Red Hat desktop team.

One thing we spent a lot of effort on for a long time now is getting full support for the NVidia binary driver under Wayland. It has been a recurring topic in our bi-weekly calls with the NVidia engineering team ever since we started looking at moving to Wayland. There has been basic binary driver support for some time, meaning you could run a native Wayland session on top of the binary driver, but the critical missing piece was that you could not get support for accelerated graphics when running applications through XWayland, our X.org compatibility layer. Which basically meant that any application requiring 3D support and which wasn’t a native Wayland application yet wouldn’t work. So over the last Months we been having a great collaboration with NVidia around closing this gap, with them working closely with us in fixing issues in their driver while we have been fixing bugs and missing pieces in the rest of the stack. We been reporting and discussing issues back and forth allowing us a very quickly turnaround on issues as we find them which of course all resulted in the NVidia 470.42.01 driver with XWayland support. I am sure we will find new corner cases that needs to be resolved in the coming Months, but I am equally sure we will be able to quickly resolve them due to the close collaboration we have now established with NVidia. And I know some people will wonder why we spent so much time working with NVidia around their binary driver, but the reality is that NVidia is the market leader, especially in the professional Linux workstation space, and there are lot of people who either would end up not using Linux or using Linux with X without it, including a lot of Red Hat customers and Fedora users. And that is what I and my team are here for at the end of the day, to make sure Red Hat customers are able to get their job done using their Linux systems.

Read more

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Node.js circuit breakers for serverless functions | Red Hat Developer

    Using circuit breakers in Node.js applications helps mitigate failures when an application calls external services. For example, if the application calls a service to get a list of movies, and that service is not running, the circuit breaker helps the application fall back and find a different way to satisfy the request—or at least inform the user that the movie list is unavailable.

    In a previous article, I showed how to use circuit breakers with Node.js. Using circuit breakers with Red Hat OpenShift Serverless Functions introduces a new challenge, which we can solve with a slightly different implementation. I'll explain the issue first, then show you how to solve it.

  • Dow CIO: Digital transformation demands rethinking talent strategy | The Enterprisers Project

    At Dow, we’ve been on a digital transformation journey for several years now, but over the past 18 months, we’ve had the opportunity to fast-track the use of digital capabilities across all of our business functions. We are well beyond the days when IT was leveraged primarily to drive productivity – we view IT as a core piece of the business and driver of value growth.

    Earlier this year, we announced a $400 million investment to accelerate digital throughout the company.

    We identified the key areas we know will improve the customer and employee experience while delivering the most value.
    Collaborating with our businesses and operational groups, we identified the key areas we know will improve the customer and employee experience while delivering the most value. One area I’m excited about is material science innovation and product commercialization. How we interact with our customers and innovate has completely changed during the pandemic, with the help of digital capabilities. For instance, when big in-person trade shows were put on hold, we began leveraging online forums and hosting virtual events with hundreds of bench scientists at once instead of one-off meetings, enabling customers to watch the events whenever convenient for them.

  • Take the 2021 Enterprisers Project reader survey

    2021 marks the eighth anniversary of The Enterprisers Project. Each year, we ask our readers to share feedback on the work we’re doing.

    Your responses have shaped the topics we cover, how we deliver articles, and importantly, your feedback has helped us better align our articles to your interests.

  • IT talent: 5 mentoring best practices for the hybrid work era

    CIOs who embrace a coaching role say that it’s one of the most rewarding aspects of their jobs. But mentoring IT talent looks different in a hybrid work environment.

    We asked CIOs who recently won the 2021 Capital CIO of the Year ORBIE Awards how they are creating opportunities for IT talent to stand out and rise to the next level - and how that has or hasn’t changed during the pandemic. The awards were presented by the Capital CIO Leadership Association, a professional community that annually recognizes CIOs for their excellence in technology leadership.

    Read on for CIO coaching and mentoring tips you can borrow on your team.

  • Red Hat Satellite 6.9 with Puma Web Server

    Until Red Hat Satellite 6.8, the Passenger web/app server was a core component of Red Hat Satellite. Satellite used Passenger to run Ruby applications such as Foreman. Satellite 6.9 is no longer using the Passenger web server. The Foreman application (main UI and API server) was ported to use the Puma project. In this post, we’ll provide an overview of Puma and see how the application server switch affected performance of the Satellite server.

  • Using NGINX Ingress Controller on Red Hat OpenShift

    Network engineering for the high availability of application services is nothing new. However, as Kubernetes-based environments become more widespread, companies are beginning to look for innovative deployments across multiple types of infrastructures (on-premise, AWS, Azure, IBM Cloud). They then begin to ask what achieving successful application delivery looks like for those types of deployments.

    In our series on Davie Street Enterprises (DSE), we've used a fictitious company to illustrate how organizations have implemented protective measures against ransomware, transformed applications, and more.

    In this post, we’ll cover how Gloria Fenderson, DSE’s Senior Manager of Network Engineering, plans to use Red Hat OpenShift and the NGINX Ingress Controller to deliver applications on a cluster running across multiple types of underlying infrastructure. Both NGINX and Red Hat solutions are designed to enable the deployment of container-based environments across multiple clouds; we'll see now how easily this is accomplished.

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Improve cross-team collaboration with Camel K

    No matter how much you know about Apache Camel, Camel K is designed to help and simplify how you connect systems in Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift, and it comes with cloud-native Kafka integration. This article helps you discover the power and simplicity of Camel K and opportunities for using it in ways you might not have previously considered.

  • The Open RAN ecosystem: How Red Hat and partners support NTT DOCOMO to deliver the Open RAN vision

    NTT DOCOMO has published a comprehensive, "5G Open RAN Ecosystem Whitepaper" describing the Open Radio Access Network (RAN) Ecosystem - OREC project in detail. Honore LaBourdette, Vice President, Telecom Media & Entertainment Industry at Red Hat and Sadayuki Abeta, Vice President & General Manager of the Radio Access Network Development Department at NTT DOCOMO, had a joint interview with Telecom TV that explains how the OREC project can accelerate Open RAN and can help 5G intelligent RAN deployment.

    NTT DOCOMO, with the help of other ecosystem members including Red Hat, helps package the best-of-breed 5G RAN system for deploying, operating, and managing OREC environment based on requests from operators considering 5G RAN to serve diverse companies and other operators needed.

  • Advanced automation and management of Network Bound Disk Encryption with RHEL System Roles

    In the previous post, Using RHEL System Roles to automate and manage Network Bound Disk Encryption, I covered utilizing the NBDE System Roles with a simple scenario where a single Tang server was used. In this post, we’ll look at a more complex scenario where we use the NBDE System Roles to implement multiple Tang servers to provide high availability and increased security, and we’ll also cover how to utilize the System Roles to both rotate Tang keys, and back up Tang keys.

  • Introducing Red Hat Weekly News

    We also do our best to communicate what we're doing and what's important. That includes showing you how to use our products and services, informing you about important updates and sharing industry analyses to help you understand the technologies that can solve business problems today.

    To that end, we've been working on Red Hat Weekly News. We'll highlight announcements, howtos, videos, resources, podcasts and other information that can help you stay current on all things Red Hat.

  • [Older] Everybody Struggles

    Everybody struggles in life every now and then. Struggling is a part of life. It doesn’t matter what other people think or say, it all depends on people’s perspectives. That determines your personal struggle. We’re all pretty lazy when it comes down to it. If you’re struggling, it’s because you need to do more than you’re doing currently. But doing more of the wrong type of activity will only suffer you more.

    This is the third week of my Outreachy internship, when I first contributed to my project I was very nervous and didn’t even have the confidence to make it and that fact of being a beginner was making me more nervous, and after making 5-6 contributions to Improve fedora QA dashboard, I tested then covid positive, I completely shattered and lost any hope of clearing Outreachy, but fortunately, those 5-6 contributions of mine made a significant difference and gave a good impression of my development skills set and finally my struggled paid off. The contribution round proved to be fruitful for me. I gained lots of confidence and learned how to google a bit

    Then during the internship, I had my first video call meeting with my mentors. It was a pleasurable experience to meet them, other than by email or chat. I completed my task successfully with proper guidance from my mentors, but it was quite excruciating when I moved to my second task. I had to make the whole page from scratch, initially, literally, I was afraid if I could do this or not, many doubts were roaming around my head.

  • Change management: 3 outdated ideas that could hold you back

    The pandemic taught us (and the organizations we lead) that we are agile – adaptable to change, innovative, and able to make things happen quickly. The demand for legacy systems to be replaced by digital ones reached the enterprise at a breakneck pace as COVID-19 uprooted the way we live and work.

    Beyond digital transformation, the last 18 months have likely uncovered other vulnerabilities in your business model. Perhaps you need to change the way you hire to keep up in the race for qualified talent. Or maybe your company needs a culture overhaul as you transition to a hybrid work model.

    Whatever your situation, the pace of change is not slowing, so it’s important to consider how you will lead your organization through it. Here are three outdated misconceptions about change management and how to address them:

  • Hybrid work: 8 challenges and benefits leaders will face | The Enterprisers Project

    For many organizations, hybrid work is the new reality. During the pandemic, many IT leaders learned under fire how to manage their teams remotely. Yet wrangling a workforce that’s now operating in two different environments - remote and office - comes with its own nuances.

    There are clear benefits of the hybrid solution, such as extending (perhaps, for good) the reach of an organization’s potential talent pool. But there are also quickly emerging challenges, particularly since this is new territory for many IT managers and employees. Now is a good time to consider the pros and cons as technology leaders determine the best long term direction and strategies for their IT teams.

  • Can I automate myself out of a job? | Enable Sysadmin

    Engineers, sysadmins, and DevOps roles' job responsibilities include answering dozens of emails, upgrading hundreds of servers, and patching all the systems in your data center or favorite cloud.

    All of these tasks take a considerable amount of time to complete—and they are sometimes boring but always important. A slight mistake can open up a potential threat to the security of the entire system. For example, failing to apply a security patch can make a system vulnerable. And let's be honest, people make mistakes. But what if you could automate these mundane tasks, save some time, and simplify your team's tasks?

  • IBM paid Pa. $33M to settle lawsuit over jobless benefits computer project - pennlive.com
  • Red Hat to back Linux Foundation-supported open source project tackling climate change | WRAL TechWire [Ed: Linux Foundation is fronting for some of the most polluting companies on the entire planet, but it has the audacity do greenwashing for them (associating "Linux" with lies)]

    Red Hat, the world’s leading provider of open source solutions, has joined OS-Climate (OS-C), a Linux Foundation-backed open source project that intends to build the breakthrough technology and data platforms needed to more fully integrate the impacts of climate change in global financial decision-making and risk management.
    As part of its membership, Red Hat will provide technical acumen and resources to help OS-C build a “Data Commons” that serves as an open data ingestion, processing and management platform for members to collaborate on standardizing and improving the accuracy of corporate climate and environmental, social and governance (ESG) metrics. The resulting curated library of public and private sources can then be used to help bankers, asset owners, asset managers and regulators assess climate risk and opportunity as elements of financial decision-making.

CentOS/IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Sending alerts to Discord and others from syslog-ng using Apprise: blocks and Python templates

    Last year, the CentOS project announced a major shift in strategy. Until recently, CentOS Linux has been a rebuild of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) sources, each RHEL release was quickly followed by a corresponding CentOS Linux release. While CentOS 7 keeps working this way, CentOS 8 will reach its end of life by the end of this year. The CentOS project is focusing on CentOS Stream. It is a continuous stream of bug fixes and new features. Some of the users were not happy about the change, that is how Rocky Linux and AlmaLinux were born.

    As about 80% of syslog-ng Open Source Edition (OSE) installations run on CentOS and RHEL (if we do not count Kindle devices…), support for CentOS Stream and CentOS Linux alternatives is a returning question. From this blog, you can learn about CentOS Stream and CentOS Linux alternatives and how the situation is affecting syslog-ng OSE users.

  • The state of CentOS Stream: Innovation in action

    In December 2020, Red Hat announced that we would be focusing our CentOS Project engineering efforts and investments solely on CentOS Stream, an upstream open source development platform where users can develop, test and contribute to a continuously delivered distribution that tracks just ahead of Red Hat Enterprise Linux. Since this announcement, we’ve seen significant activity both within and around the CentOS Stream community, including the launch of several derivative operating systems and the introduction of Red Hat Enterprise Linux programs to ease the migration process for users of CentOS Linux.

  • Red Hat Innovation Awards - Advice on writing a great submission

    The nomination period for the 2022 Red Hat Innovation Awards has been extended to September 20, 2021 - which means there is still time for you to nominate your organization for innovative uses of Red Hat’s open source technology.

  • Learn about containers and Kubernetes with Red Hat Academy

    As the next generation of IT professionals prepares to enter the workforce, Red Hat is taking strides to meet them where they are. A major component of this effort is Red Hat Academy, which offers free training on the Red Hat product portfolio to tens of thousands of students per year at high schools and higher education institutions around the globe.

    Among other courses, the curriculum includes offerings on Red Hat OpenShift including Introduction to OpenShift Applications (DO101) and Red Hat OpenShift I: Containers & Kubernetes (DO180). These courses introduce students to building and managing containers for deployment on a Kubernetes cluster.

    Introduction to OpenShift Applications is a developer-focused introduction to OpenShift application building. The course walks you through production scenarios such as scaling and troubleshooting your applications. This course can also help future administrators who might be working with code as infrastructure or with automation take the next step into development.

    Students who are interested in learning more about the underlying OpenShift infrastructure and have strong Red Hat Certified System Administrator (RHCSA)-level skills should start with Red Hat OpenShift I: Containers & Kubernetes (DO180).

  • Let’s talk about industry scoring systems

    When it comes to electronics, sustainability rating systems measure a company’s or product’s performance against established benchmarks in categories such as environmental impact, production, ethics, working conditions, use and disposal of devices and procurement. They usually examine specific topics like repairability, sustainability, environmental footprint or social impact programs. In fact, we are sometimes consulted by such rating organisations to help shape what is assessed.

    These rating systems are useful for both businesses and consumers. The focus areas defined by such systems are relevant points of guidance for any company trying to move in a more sustainable direction, and ratings help consumers make informed decisions.

  • Surprise! It's IBM i Technology Refresh Time [Ed: 'News' sites about IBM, sponsored by IBM]

    IBM surprised the midrange world last week by announcing Technology Refreshes (TRs) for IBM i 7.3 and 7.4, which became generally available on Friday. The fall TRs, which typically are announced in October, brought support for the new Power10-based Power E1080 server in addition to a slew of enhancements to the operating system and surrounding IBM i products.

    The big piece of news with the new TRs – IBM i TR 7.3 TR11 and 7.4 TR5 – is support for servers based on IBM’s speedy new Power10 processor, which is the first Power chip based on its 7 nanometer process. Companies that want to use one of the new Power10 servers – starting with the high-end Power E1080, which is slated to ship later this month – will have to run 7.3 TR11 or 7.4 TR5. Midrange and entry-level Power10 models, which are expected to be announced later this year and into 2021, will also need one of these two operating systems.

    But IBM packed a lot more goodies into these TRs (its fourth TR refresh during the COVID pandemic) that will interest the bulk of IBM i shops (that is, the 99.9 percent of us who aren’t immediately adopting the big new enterprise-class machine). We’ll give you a general overview of these goodies in this story, to be followed with more detailed stories on specific items.

Stuart D Gathman: How do you Fedora?

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Red Hat
Interviews

For 35 years, Stuart worked as a System programmer for a small company where his projects included database servers, device drivers, protocol stacks, expert systems, accounting systems, aged AR/AP reports, and EDI. Currently, he is doing hourly consulting work for small businesses.

Stuart’s childhood heroes were his Dad and George Müller. His favorite movies are “The Gods must be crazy” and “The mission”. He grew up in a pacifist denomination, so feels “The mission” movie is very relevant to him. He loves over roasted vegetables.

Composing and performing music, Mesh networking, and refurbishing discarded computers to run Fedora Linux are some of his spare time interests as well as history, especially ancient Western and 19th century English/American.

“Love/charity, Hope, Faith, Virtue, and knowledge” are the five qualities someone should possess, according to Stuart.

Read more

Also: Fedora Community Blog: Contribute at Fedora Linux 35 GNOME 41 Test Day

IBM and Debian Leftovers

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Red Hat
Debian

  • Some things to reduce background bandwidth usage on a Fedora machine

    Suppose, not entirely hypothetically, that you have a Fedora laptop and you want it to use minimal bandwidth for things that you don't specifically do. Unfortunately there are only a few things that I know of to do, and I'm not sure they're comprehensive. Most of my information comes from this old r/Fedora post.

  • First POWER10 Machine Announced

    IBM turns up the volume to 10 (and their server numbers to four digits) with the Power E1080 server, the launch system for POWER10. POWER10 is a 7nm chip fabbed by Samsung with up to 15 SMT-8 cores (a 16th core is disabled for yield) for up to 120 threads per chip. IBM bills POWER10 as having 2.5 times more performance per core than Intel Xeon Platinum (based on an HPE Superdome system running Xeon Platinum 8380H parts), 2.5 times the AES crypto performance per core of POWER9 (no doubt due to quadruple the crypto engines present), five times "AI inferencing per socket" (whatever that means) over Power E980 via the POWER10's matrix math and AI accelerators, and 33% less power usage than the E980 for the same workload. AIX, Linux and IBM i are all supported.

  • Russ Allbery: Pod::Thread 3.00

    This Perl module converts POD documents to thread, the macro language I use for my static site builder (about which, more in another software release coming up shortly). This release fixes a whole ton of long-standing problems.

  • Fscrypt broken in user spot

    It turns out that there is a fundamental problem in EasyOS. If a person entered a password at the very first bootup, Easy creates encrypted folders in the ext4 working-partition. So, if anyone steals your usb-stick or hard drive, they won't be able to access the files in those folders.

    The encryption mechanism works on a per-folder basis, and the init script in the initrd will unlock those folders when the correct password is entered at bootup. It works great, however, falls apart if login as a non-root user...

    I have a utility, 'keyctl', from the 'keyutils' package. I have today compiled that in OE and added it to the package list, so it will be in future releases of EasyOS. It is for managing the kernel keys. I know hardly anything about this topic, but let's explore...

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • [Book] Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 Administration · Pablo Iranzo Gómez's blog

    After some time working on it (about 6 months for the main work and some more time for the reviews) with my colleagues Miguel and Scott, we’ve finally made it thanks to the support from our families and Packt, as well as several members of RH teams that gave the clearance to get it out!

    The book targets users willing to learn skills to administer Red Hat Enterprise Linux or compatible systems. It is a hands-on guide to the administration and can be used as reference thanks to the real-life examples provided along the text.

  • [IBM] Irving Wladawsky-Berger: Why Do We Work So Damn Much?

    A few weeks ago, I listened to a very interesting podcast, Why Do We Work So Damn Much?, where podcast host, NY Times columnist Ezra Klein, interviewed anthropologist James Suzman. Suzman has devoted almost thirty years to studying and writing about the Ju’hoansi and other bushmen from the Kalahari Basin, who are among the world’s few remaining hunter-gatherer societies. He recently published Work: A Deep History from the Stone Age to the Age of Robots, a book about his research.

    Modern humans emerged in Africa between 200,000 and 300,000 years ago. Our homo sapiens ancestors were hunter-gatherers for most of those years, collecting wild plants and hunting wild animals. Starting around 12,000 years ago, the agricultural revolution introduced the domestication of plants and animals, leading many hunter-gatherer groups to establish agricultural communities and villages.

    The vast majority of hunter-gatherers disappeared a long time ago, but a few groups remain in isolated sections of Africa, Australia, the Amazon rainforest and the Arctic. Anthropologists have been studying these remaining hunter-gatherers to learn how they’ve been able to survive so much longer than other human groups, as well as to understand the behaviors and cultures that modern humans may have inherited from our closest ancestors.

  • IBM accused of stealing trade secrets from Chinese joint venture

    The complaint said IBM China -- which Neu Cloud alleged was being directed by IBM Corp -- and its Beijing-based distributor Beijing TeamSun Technology Co., a "leading integrated information technology service provider in China," formed Neu Cloud in 2014 to "further open up the Chinese market" for hardware and software based on IBM's Power Systems servers. Their agreement allegedly made Neu Cloud "completely reliant" on IBM for its supply and gave IBM "substantial control" of its operation.

    Neu Cloud said it submitted bid requests to IBM under their agreement that included confidential customer information, and that IBM agreed to keep it confidential.

    According to the complaint, IBM established a separate joint venture with another Chinese company, INSPUR Co, in 2017 to also develop and market Power Systems products.

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Programming Leftovers

  • Announcement : An AArch64 (Arm64) Darwin port is planned for GCC12

    As many of you know, Apple has now released an AArch64-based version of macOS and desktop/laptop platforms using the ‘M1’ chip to support it. This is in addition to the existing iOS mobile platforms (but shares some of their constraints). There is considerable interest in the user-base for a GCC port (starting with https://gcc.gnu.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=96168) - and, of great kudos to the gfortran team, one of the main drivers is folks using Fortran. Fortunately, I was able to obtain access to one of the DTKs, courtesy of the OSS folks, and using that managed to draft an initial attempt at the port last year (however, nowhere near ready for presentation in GCC11). Nevertheless (as an aside) despite being a prototype, the port is in use with many via hombrew, macports or self-builds - which has shaken out some of the fixable bugs. The work done in the prototype identified three issues that could not be coded around without work on generic parts of the compiler. I am very happy to say that two of our colleagues, Andrew Burgess and Maxim Blinov (both from embecosm) have joined me in drafting a postable version of the port and we are seeking sponsorship to finish this in the GCC12 timeframe. Maxim has a lightning talk on the GNU tools track at LPC (right after the steering committee session) that will focus on the two generic issues that we’re tackling (1 and 2 below). Here is a short summary of the issues and proposed solutions (detailed discussion of any of the parts below would better be in new threads).

  • Apple Silicon / M1 Port Planned For GCC 12 - Phoronix

    Developers are hoping for next year's GCC 12 release they will have Apple AArch64 support on Darwin in place for being able to support Apple Silicon -- initially the M1 SoC -- on macOS with GCC. LLVM/Clang has long been supporting AArch64 on macOS given that Apple leverages LLVM/Clang as part of their official Xcode toolchain as the basis for their compiler across macOS to iOS and other products. While the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) supports AArch64 and macOS/Darwin, it hasn't supported the two of them together but there is a port in progress to change it.

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: tidyCpp 0.0.5 on CRAN: More Protect’ion

    Another small release of the tidyCpp package arrived on CRAN overnight. The packages offers a clean C++ layer (as well as one small C++ helper class) on top of the C API for R which aims to make use of this robust (if awkward) C API a little easier and more consistent. See the vignette for motivating examples. The Protect class now uses the default methods for copy and move constructors and assignment allowing for wide use of the class. The small NumVec class now uses it for its data member.

  • QML Modules in Qt 6.2

    With Qt 6.2 there is, for the first time, a comprehensive build system API that allows you to specify a QML module as a complete, encapsulated unit. This is a significant improvement, but as the concept of QML modules was rather under-developed in Qt 5, even seasoned QML developers might now ask "What exactly is a QML module". In our previous post we have scratched the surface by introducing the CMake API used to define them. We'll take a closer look in this post.

  • Santiago Zarate: So you want to recover and old git branch because it has been overwritten?
  • Start using YAML now | Opensource.com

    YAML (YAML Ain't Markup Language) is a human-readable data serialization language. Its syntax is simple and human-readable. It does not contain quotation marks, opening and closing tags, or braces. It does not contain anything which might make it harder for humans to parse nesting rules. You can scan your YAML document and immediately know what's going on. [...] At this point, you know enough YAML to get started. You can play around with the online YAML parser to test yourself. If you work with YAML daily, then this handy cheatsheet will be helpful.

  • 40 C programming examples

    C programming language is one of the popular programming languages for novice programmers. It is a structured programming language that was mainly developed for UNIX operating system. It supports different types of operating systems, and it is very easy to learn. 40 useful C programming examples have been shown in this tutorial for the users who want to learn C programming from the beginning.

Devices/Embedded: Asus Tinker Board 2 and More

  • Asus Tinker Board 2 single-board computer now available for $94 and up - Liliputing

    The Asus Tinker Board 2 is a Raspberry Pi-shaped single-board computer powered by a Rockchip RK3399 hexa-core processor and featuring 2GB to 4GB of RAM. First announced almost a year ago, the Tinker Board 2 is finally available for $99 and up. Asus also offers a Tinker Board 2S model that’s pretty similar except that it has 16GB of eMMC storage. Prices for that model start at about $120.

  • Raspberry Pi Weekly Issue #371 - Sir Clive Sinclair, 1940 – 2021

    This week ended with the incredibly sad news of the passing of Sir Clive Sinclair. He was one of the founding fathers of home computing and got many of us at Raspberry Pi hooked on programming as kids. Join us in sharing your Sinclair computing memories with us on Twitter and our blog, and we’ll see you next week.

  • cuplTag battery-powered NFC tag logs temperature and humidity (Crowdfunding) - CNX Software

    Temperature and humidity sensors would normally connect to a gateway sending data to the cloud, the coin-cell battery-powered cuplTag NFC tag instead sends data to your smartphone after a tap. CulpTag is controlled by an MSP430 16-bit microcontroller from Texas Instruments which reads and stores sensor data regularly into an EEPROM, and the data can then be read over NFC with the tag returning an URL with the data from the sensor and battery, then display everything on the phone’s web browser (no app needed).

  • A first look at Microchip PolarFire SoC FPGA Icicle RISC-V development board - CNX Software

    Formally launched on Crowd Supply a little over a year ago, Microchip PolarFire SoC FPGA Icicle (codenamed MPFS-ICICLE-KIT-ES) was one of the first Linux & FreeBSD capable RISC-V development boards. The system is equipped with PolarFire SoC FPGA comprised a RISC-V CPU subsystem with four 64-bit RISC-V (RV64GC) application cores, one 64-bit RISC-V real-time core (RV64IMAC), as well as FPGA fabric. Backers of the board have been able to play with it for several months ago, but Microchip is now sending the board to more people for evaluation/review, and I got one of my own to experiment with. That’s good to have a higher-end development board instead of the usual hobbyist-grade board. Today, I’ll just have a look at the kit content and main components on the board before playing with Linux and FPGA development tools in an upcoming or two posts.

  • What is IoT device management?

    Smart devices are everywhere around us. We carry one in our pocket, watch movies on another while a third cooks us dinner. Every day there are thousands of new devices connecting to the Internet. Research shows that by 2025, more than 150,000 IoT devices will come online every minute. With such vast numbers it is impossible to keep everything in working order just on your own. This brings the need for IoT device management. But what is IoT device management? To answer this question we first need to understand what the Internet of Things (IoT) is.

  • Beelink U59 mini PC with Intel Celeron N5095 Jasper Lake coming soon - Liliputing

    Beelink says the system ships with Windows 10, but it should also supports Linux.

  • Beelink U59 Celeron N5095 Jasper Lake mini PC to ship with 16GB RAM, 512GB SSD - CNX Software

    Beelink U59 is an upcoming Jasper Lake mini PC based on the Intel Celeron N5095 15W quad-core processor that will ship with up to 16GB RAM, and 512 GB M.2 SSD storage. The mini PC will also offer two 4K HDMI 2.0 ports, a Gigabit Ethernet port, WiFi 5, as well as four USB 3.0 ports, and support for 2.5-inch SATA drives up to 7mm thick.

Graphics: Mesa, KWinFT, and RADV

  • Experimenting Is Underway For Rust Code Within Mesa - Phoronix

    Longtime Mesa developer Karol Herbst who has worked extensively on the open-source NVIDIA "Nouveau" driver as well as the OpenCL/compute stack while being employed by Red Hat is now toying with the idea of Rust code inside Mesa.  Karol Herbst has begun investigating how Rust code, which is known for its memory safety and concurrency benefits, could be used within Mesa. Ultimately he's evaluating how Rust could be used inside Mesa as an API implementation as well as for leveraging existing Mesa code by Rust. 

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  • KWinFT Continues Working On WLROOTS Render, Library Split

    KWinFT as a fork of KDE's KWin X11/Wayland compositor code continues making progress on driving fundamental display improvements and ironing out the Wayland support.  KWinFT has been transitioning to use WLROOTS for its Wayland heavy-lifting and that process remains ongoing. KWinFT has also been working on splitting up its library code to make it more manageable and robust.  Among the features still desired by KWinFT and to be worked on include input methods, graphical tablet support, and PipeWire video stream integration. Currently there are two full-time developers working on the project but they hope to scale up to four to five full-time developers. 

  • Raytracing Starting to Come Together – Bas Nieuwenhuizen – Open Source GPU Drivers

    I am back with another status update on raytracing in RADV. And the good news is that things are finally starting to come together. After ~9 months of on and off work we’re now having games working with raytracing.

  • Multiple Games Are Now Working With RADV's Ray-Tracing Code - Phoronix

    Not only is Intel progressing with its open-source ray-tracing driver support but the Mesa Radeon Vulkan driver "RADV" has been rounding out its RT code too and now has multiple games correctly rendering. Bas Nieuwenhuizen has been spearheading the RADV work on Vulkan ray-tracing support and after more than a half-year tackling it things are starting to fall into place nicely.Games such as Quake II RTX with native Vulkan ray-tracing are working along with the game control via VKD3D-Proton for going from Direct3D 12 DXR to Vulkan RT. Metro Exodus is also working while Ghostrunner and Doom Eternal are two games tested that are not yet working.

Audiocasts/Shows: Full Circle Weekly News, Juno Computers, Kali Linux 2021.3