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Red Hat

IBM and SUSE Leftovers

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Red Hat
SUSE
  • Deploying your storage backend using OpenShift Container Storage 4

    This Blog is for both system administrators and application developers interested in learning how to deploy and manage Red Hat OpenShift Container Storage 4 (OCS). This Blog outlines how you will be using OpenShift Container Platform (OCP) 4.2.14+ and the OCS operator to deploy Ceph and the Multi-Cloud Object Gateway as a persistent storage solution for OCP workloads. If you do not have a current OpenShift test cluster, you can deploy OpenShift 4 by going to the OpenShift 4 Deployment page and then follow the instructions for AWS Installer-Provisioned Infrastructure (IPI).

  • What desktop OS do you use at work?

    We have all heard the age-old debate of what is the best operating system user prefer. Windows or Mac? Linux or nothing. The funny thing about this question is that in many places of business, the user does not get a choice. You are handed a laptop when you start and may be stuck with whatever is preloaded onto the machine. In some cases, you're not even allowed to run something else in a virtual machine.

  • Fedora program update: 2020-03

    I will not hold office hours next week due to travel, but if you’ll be at DevConf.CZ, you can catch me in person.

  • Martin de Boer: Comparing uptime performance monitoring tools: StatusCake vs Freshping vs UptimeRobot

    When you host your own website on a Virtual Private Server or on a DigitalOcean droplet, you want to know if your website is down (and receive a warning when that happens). Plus it’s fun to see the uptime graphs and the performance metrics. Did you know these services are available for free?

    I will compare 3 SaaS vendors who offer uptime performance monitoring tools. Of course, you don’t get the full functionality for free. There are always limitations as these vendors like you to upgrade to a premium (paid) account. But for an enthousiast website, having access to these free basic options is already a big win!

    I also need to address the elephant in the room: Pingdom. This is the golden standard of uptime performance monitoring tools. However, you will pay at least €440 per year for the privilege. That is a viable option for a small business. Not for an enthousiast like myself.

    The chosen free alternatives are StatusCake, Freshping and UptimeRobot. There are many other options, but these ones are mentioned in multiple lists of ‘the best monitoring tools’. They also have user friendly dashboards. So let’s run with it.

  • Vinzenz Vietzke: Running for openSUSE Board #2: Questions and Answers

    Already in the beginning of 2019 I have been a candidate for the board of openSUSE. Since there are now two places open again, I am again available for the task and run for election.

    A general overview of my ideas and goals can be found here.

    In the run-up to the election all candidates of the community are of course open for questions. I have answered a catalogue of 5 questions from Gerald Pfeifer, currently chairman of the board, and would like to make it available here.

  • Q&A for openSUSE Board elections

    Our openSUSE Chairman has some questions for the candidates for the openSUSE Board. My answers are here:

Fedora CoreOS out of preview

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Red Hat

The Fedora CoreOS team is pleased to announce that Fedora CoreOS is now available for general use. Here are some more details about this exciting delivery.

Fedora CoreOS is a new Fedora Edition built specifically for running containerized workloads securely and at scale. It’s the successor to both Fedora Atomic Host and CoreOS Container Linux and is part of our effort to explore new ways of assembling and updating an OS. Fedora CoreOS combines the provisioning tools and automatic update model of Container Linux with the packaging technology, OCI support, and SELinux security of Atomic Host. For more on the Fedora CoreOS philosophy, goals, and design, see the announcement of the preview release.

Read more

Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Red Hat Accelerates Cloud-Native Development with Unified Hybrid Cloud Storage for Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform

    Enhanced with Multi-Cloud Object Gateway from Red Hat’s 2018 acquisition of NooBaa, Red Hat OpenShift Container Storage 4 offers greater abstraction and flexibility so customers have the freedom to choose data services across multiple public clouds, while still operating from a unified Kubernetes-based control plane for applications and storage. In addition to helping customers avoid public cloud lock-in, this enables developers to keep their data close to applications through improved accessibility, delivering a more efficient developer experience.

    With a consistent Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3) interface, enterprises now have built-in object storage and scalability needed to support portability for data-intensive applications across the hybrid cloud on Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, previously unavailable through any container storage vendor in the OpenShift OperatorHub.

  • OpenShift and Kubernetes, with Clayton Coleman

    Five years ago, Clayton Coleman took a bet on a new open source project that Google was about to announce. He became the first external contributor to Kubernetes, and the architect of Red Hat’s reinvention of OpenShift from PaaS to “enterprise Kubernetes”. Hosts Adam Glick and Craig Box return for 2020 with the story of OpenShift, and their picks for Game of the Holidays.

  • Command Line Heroes season 4 trailer

    No one ever said hardware was easy. In Season 4, Command Line Heroes is telling 7 special stories about people and teams who dared to change the rules of hardware and in the process changed how we all interact with technology.

    The first episode drops January 28, 2020. Subscribe today and sign up for the newsletter to get the latest updates and bonus content.

  • Deploying applications in the OpenShift 4.3 Developer perspective

    In this article, we take a look at user flow improvements for deploying applications in Red Hat OpenShift 4.3‘s Developer perspective. You can learn more about all of the developer-focused console improvements in the OpenShift 4.3 release article here. Since the initial launch of the Developer perspective in the OpenShift 4.2 release, we’ve had frequent feedback sessions with developers, developer advocates, stakeholders, and other community members to better understand how the experience meets their needs. While, overall, the user interface has been well received, we continue to gather and use the feedback to enhance our flows.

  • A ‘fail fast’ solution for end-to-end machine learning

    Enterprise AI solutions are characterized by an end-to-end workflow that involves data sourcing, querying, ETL, feature engineering, and training the machine learning algorithms. Did you know there’s an end-to-end machine learning pipeline, which can be built using Pythonic frameworks, that allows you to fail fast at TeraScale data levels?

Red Hat: 'Cloud', 'Study', Hoodies and OpenShift

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  • Crafting a future-proof application environment across the hybrid cloud

    Modern information technology (IT) success requires the right investment in infrastructure and tooling. Beyond the tooling, however, the real benchmark for accomplishment lies in the successful development, deployment and operation of applications that power an organization. Ultimately the applications are what drive value to customers, partners and employees.

    The challenge for IT becomes how to combine available technologies to empower development teams to do their work and successfully operate the resulting applications.

    Thinking of the overall organizational IT capacity as an application environment that spans the various cloud locations, on-premises resources and technologies deployed seems daunting. However, it provides a very useful lens through which to look at long term IT strategy.

  • The Red Hat Edge: How Red Hat OpenStack Platforms Delivers the Potential for Nearly 600 Percent ROI

    To conduct this study, IDC interviewed eight organizations asking survey respondents a mix of quantitative and qualitative questions about the impact that Red Hat OpenStack Platform has had on their IT operations, businesses and cost of deploying private cloud services. Interviewees encompassed the financial services, manufacturing, financial technology, information technology, medical research, automotive, education and healthcare sectors.

  • Red Hat Summit 2020 flash sale: get your hoodie before it's gone!

    Planning to go to Red Hat Summit this year? You don't want to miss the industry's premier enterprise open source technology conference, and it's coming up fast! We've got an added incentive for you to sign up today, until end of day January 23 or we run out, we're giving a special bonus to folks who register for Red Hat Summit.

    Through January 23rd or until we've moved through our limited quantity (whichever comes first), those who register for Red Hat Summit will get an exclusive Red Hat Summit hoodie with their Summit registration. We expect these to go fast, so don't hesitate to register today and take advantage of the flash sale to get Early Bird Red Hat Summit pricing and a little something extra.

  • OpenShift Container Storage 4: Introduction to Ceph

    This Blog will go through Ceph fundamental knowledge for a better understanding of the underlying storage solution used by Red Hat OpenShift Container Storage 4.

  • New and improved Topology view for OpenShift 4.3

    The Topology view in the Red Hat OpenShift console’s Developer perspective is a thoughtfully designed interface that provides a visual representation of an application’s structure. This view helps developers clearly identify one resource type from another, as well as understand the overall communication dynamics within the application. Launched with the 4.2 release of OpenShift, the Topology view has already earned a spotlight in the cloud-native application development arena. The constant feedback cycles and regular follow-ups on the ongoing trends in the developer community have helped to shape up a great experience in the upcoming release. This article focuses on a few showstopper features in the Topology view that were added for OpenShift 4.3.

Red Hat: OpenShift Releases, FIPS 140-2 and More

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Red Hat
  • Introducing Multi-Cloud Object Gateway for OpenShift
  • Introducing OpenShift Container Storage 4.2
  • Introducing Red Hat OpenShift 4.3 to Enhance Kubernetes Security
  • What’s new in the OpenShift 4.3 console developer experience

    The developer experience is significantly improved in the Red Hat OpenShift 4.3 web console. If you have used the Developer perspective, which was introduced in OpenShift 4.2 Console, you are probably familiar with our streamlined user flows for deploying applications, the new Topology view, and the enhanced experience around OpenShift Pipelines powered by Tekton and OpenShift Serverless powered by Knative. This release continues to improve upon the features that were introduced in 4.2 and introduces new flows and features for the developer.

  • Self Service Speedbumps

    In my case, there is a flavor that almost matches; it has 10 GB of Disk space instead of the required 25. But I cannot use it.

    Instead, I have to use a larger flavor that has double the VCPUs, and thus eats up more of my VCPU quota….to the point that I cannot afford more than 4 Virtual machines of this size, and thus cannot create more than one compute node; OpenShift needs 3 nodes for the control plane.

    I do not have permissions to create a flavor on this cloud. Thus, my only option is to open a ticket. Which has to be reviewed and acted upon by an administrator. Not a huge deal.

    This is how self service breaks down. A non-security decision (link disk size with the other characteristics of a flavor) plus Access Control rules that prevent end users from customizing. So the end user waits for a human to respond

    In my case, that means that I have to provide an alternative place to host my demonstration, just in case things don’t happen in time. Which costs my organization money.

    This is not a ding on my cloud provider. They have the same OpenStack API as anyone else deploying OpenStack.

  • How RHEL 8 is designed for FIPS 140-2 requirements

    Deploying software in a large organization is a challenging task when it comes to providing a consistent and reasonable level of security. Any number of vendors are involved in delivering software that addresses numerous needs of the organization, and that combination of software includes numerous claims and security mechanisms. How can an organization be made aware that all deployed software systems contain generally accepted and state of the art in today’s standards cryptography? Should the organization receiving the software understand and review all the algorithms and protocols used by the software?

    Although, in the open source world the latter may be feasible, it is not always a reasonable or scalable option for the IT department of each and every organization. That is why in Red Hat Enterprise Linux, we seek to comply with the FIPS 140-2 standard. FIPS 140-2 is a joint effort between NIST and the Canadian Centre for Cyber Security (CCCS).

  • Design Sprints: the Red Hat Way

Release for CentOS Linux 8 (1911)

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Release for CentOS Linux 8 (1911)

We are pleased to announce the general availability of CentOS Linux 8.
Effectively immediately, this is the current release for CentOS Linux 8 and is tagged as 1911,
derived
from Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 Source Code.

As always, read through the Release Notes at :
http://wiki.centos.org/Manuals/ReleaseNotes/CentOS8.1911 - these notes
contain important information about the release and details about some
of the content inside the release from the CentOS QA team. These notes
are updated constantly to include issues and incorporate feedback from
the users.

Read more

Let’s write a new vision statement for Fedora

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Red Hat

This statement reflects our values, the four foundations of Freedom, Friends, Features, and First.

We talked a lot about Fedora’s Freedom foundation. As a project, we want everyone to live in a universe of free and open source software; the user should be in control of their computing. But we also recognize the reality that we have to lead people there, not push them. People have hardware that requires closed drivers, and sometimes the software they need for their jobs or life isn’t open either. We want people to be able to use open source for everything, but often the real world doesn’t let them. We need to provide a path so people can get to the ideal, not demand that they teleport there or else. We want our vision statement to encourage a productive approach rather than to act as a weapon.

We also want the statement to reflect our community approach — the Friends foundation. Fedora isn’t bits and bytes. Fedora is our people, and we want the statement to include our vision of a healthy community. As the saying goes, none of us is as smart as all of us. A welcoming and inclusive project produces better results.

And finally, we want to keep our focus on innovation, both by incorporating the latest upstream code and in the work we do to build our releases. While long-term support is important, it’s not our focus — and many other communities do a great job providing this already. Fedora advances the state of the art in Linux operating systems. We try new things, many of them succeed, but some do not — we learn from those and move on.

Read more

Also: F31-20200113 updated Lives released

Red Hat: Openwashing, Goals, Runtimes, LOT Network (LOT),and More

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Red Hat
  • What communities of practice can do for your organization

    Increased collaboration. A recent survey from My Customer.com shows that 40 percent of company employees report not feeling adequately supported by their colleagues—because "different departments have their own agendas." A lack of collaboration between departments limits innovation and increases opportunities for miscommunication. Communities of practice encourage members from all roles across all departments to unite in sharing their expertise. This increases collaboration and reduces the threat of organizational silos.

    Rapid problem-solving. Communities of practice provide a centralized location for communication and resources useful for solving organizational or business problems. Enabling people to come together—regardless of their organizational reporting structure, location, and/or management structure—encourages problem-solving and can lead to faster resolution of those problems.

    Enhanced innovation. Researchers Pouwels and Koster recently argued that “collaboration contributes to innovation." CoPs provide a unique opportunity for members to collaborate on topics within their shared domains of interest and passion. This passion ignites a desire to discover new and innovative ways to solve problems and create new ideas.

  • Goals: Red Hat Developer Working On New Tool To Improve Upon Make

    Longtime Red Hat developer Richard Jones has begun developing "Goals" as a new tool to improve upon Make, the common build automation tool.

    While more open-source projects are turning to CMake or Meson+Ninja, Red Hat's Richard Jones has been working on Goals as an incremental improvement over Make and aiming to address some of the design deficits for this originally four decade old software.

    [...]

    There is an MP4 video recording of his talk of Goals. There are also his notes where he explains more of the Make shortcomings and work on Goals.

  • What’s new in Red Hat Runtimes?

    We are excited to announce that the latest release of Red Hat Runtimes is now available. The team has been hard at work on new updates and capabilities for building enterprise-grade, cloud-native applications.

    Red Hat Runtimes, part of the Red Hat Middleware portfolio, is a set of products, tools and components for developing and maintaining cloud-native applications. It offers lightweight runtimes and frameworks for highly-distributed cloud architectures, such as microservices or serverless applications. Read on to learn more about the new updates and features that are currently available in Red Hat Runtimes.

  • Red Hat commends IBM’s decision to join the LOT Network, protecting developers from patent threats

    Red Hat is pleased to see IBM—the number one U.S. patent recipient and Red Hat’s parent company—announce today it is joining the LOT Network (LOT), a non-profit company we helped found. Since 2014, Red Hat and other top companies around the world have joined LOT to provide an innovative response to the threat patent assertion entities (PAEs) pose. IBM is an extraordinary addition to LOT’s more than 600 members, which together hold more than two million patent assets.

    Both IBM and Red Hat use patents to further their strategic interests. IBM uses patents to protect and benefit from its substantial R&D investments. Red Hat uses patents exclusively to deter patent aggression against the company and the open source projects it supports. Both companies seek a patent ecosystem that protects their communities from patent aggression while encouraging open source innovation. Red Hat and IBM have approached this challenge from several directions.

  • Modernizing Red Hat Enterprise Linux System management the easy way

    As an IT manager, you need to establish the right processes to be confident in your teams’ ability to keep critical applications running smoothly and securely. Most companies face challenges like stretched IT staff, a complex technology stack, and environment sprawl that now includes public and private clouds. It becomes clear that you have to help your teams work smarter, because manual methods cannot keep pace with these trends.

    Red Hat Enterprise Linux is the intelligent operating system of choice for many customers. Why? Many factors including a hardened operating system, years of Red Hat experience in supporting a very diverse set of customer needs, management through Red Hat Insights, attention to security and more play into this. Recognizing the management challenges of cloud and on-premises deployment models and limited staff, we have designed Insights to provide proactive management analytics that can help your teams deliver IT services with confidence.

  • Introducing new Red Hat Enterprise Linux certification for software partner products

    We are pleased to announce an improved software certification for Red Hat partner products built for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 (RHEL 8). This new RHEL software certification validates the use of common best practices, improves joint supportability, and promotes your product in the new Red Hat Ecosystem Catalog.

  • It’s time to rock at Red Hat Summit!

    What could be better than a high-energy week of innovation, education and collaboration at the industry's premier enterprise open source technology conference?

    How about a performance by a Grammy Award-winning rock band?

    That’s just what you’ll get at Red Hat Summit 2020. On Wed Apr. 29, all attendees are invited to join us at the Bill Graham Civic Auditorium for an exhilarating night full of food, drinks and music headlined by Vampire Weekend!

    Celebrated by GQ as "one of the most important bands of the 21st century," the band from New York City released their fourth studio album, Father of the Bride, in May 2019. The third Vampire Weekend album in a row to reach No. 1 on the Billboard 200 has also been nominated for three Grammy awards including Album of the Year. Vampire Weekend tops several "Best Albums of 2019" and "Best of the Decade" critic charts by: Rolling Stone, Pitchfork, Billboard, NPR and US Weekly, to name a few.

Fedora, Red Hat and IBM: FSTRIM, Java APIs and DAX

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  • Fedora 32 Greenlit For Enabling FSTRIM Support By Default

    Back in December was the proposal to finally enable FSTRIM by default for Fedora 32 in benefiting solid-state storage. Today the formal approval was given by the Fedora Engineering and Steering Committee to go ahead with this long overdue change.

    The change is to enable the systemd fstrim.timer unit by default for running FSTRIM weekly on EXT4/XFS/Btrfs/F2FS file-systems running on flash-based storage devices. FSTRIM is used for notifying the underlying storage devices about unused blocks for wear leveling and more efficient handling.

  • Fedora program update: 2020-02

    I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

  • Red Hat urges U.S. Supreme Court to support unrestricted use of software interfaces

    Today, Red Hat filed an amicus brief (a "friend of the court" brief) asking the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit decision in Oracle v. Google. The lower court incorrectly extended copyright protection to software interfaces. If left uncorrected, the lower court rulings could harm software compatibility and interoperability and have a chilling effect on the innovation represented by the open source community.

    As the world’s largest developer of enterprise open source software solutions, Red Hat’s customers include more than 90% of the Fortune 500. Using a community-powered approach to software development, Red Hat has developed reliable, high-performing, enterprise-quality cloud, middleware, storage, and virtualization technologies.

    Red Hat also has a long and extensive history of developing software written in Java as well as implementations of the Java programming language. Red Hat’s significant involvement with Java development over the last 20 years has included extensive contributions to OpenJDK, an open source implementation of the Java platform, and the development of Red Hat Middleware, a suite of Java-based middleware solutions to build, integrate, automate and deploy enterprise applications.

    [...]

    "The Federal Circuit’s unduly narrow construction of 17 U.S.C. § 102(Cool is harmful to progress, competition, and innovation in the field of software development," Red Hat stated in the brief. "IBM and Red Hat urge the Court to reverse the decision below on the basis that 17 U.S.C. § 102(Cool excludes software interfaces from copyright protection."

  • Announcing new data sets on the IBM Data Asset eXchange

    The IBM® Data Asset eXchange (DAX) is an online hub for developers and data scientists to find carefully curated free and open data sets under open data licenses. A particular focus of the exchange is data sets under the Community Data License Agreement (CDLA). Since launching the exchange in 2019, the CODAIT team has been working on steadily adding new data sets to the exchange.

    [...]

    To make it easier to use data sets on the Data Asset eXchange, we’ve introduced interactive notebooks hosted on Watson Studio that illustrate how to get started with your first steps of exploratory data analysis. Right now, we’ve added notebooks for a few data sets, including Fashion-MNIST, JFK Weather, PubTabNet, PubLayNet and more.

    We’re working on more content related to data cleansing, exploratory analysis, and machine learning with data sets from the Data Asset eXchange, so watch this space! We encourage you to check out these recent data sets and notebooks as well as all of the other data sets.

Fedora 31 | Review from an openSUSE User

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Reviews

Fedora is a Linux distribution that has been around since the beginning of my Linux adventure and for which I have incredible respect. I have reviewed Fedora before, and it was a good experience. Last time I used Fedora, I used Gnome and since I am kind of Gnome fatigued right now, I thought it better to use a different desktop, one that I can easily shape my experience to my needs, clearly, there are only two options but I chose to go with the primer, most easily customized desktop, KDE Plasma, ultimately, I want to compare my Fedora Plasma experience with my openSUSE Tumbleweed Plasma experience. I have no intention of switching distros but I do like to, from time to time, see how other distributions compare. Of all the distributions available outside of openSUSE, Fedora and Debian are the two that interest me the most but for different reasons.

This is my review as a biased openSUSE Tumbleweed user. Bottom Line Up Front. Fedora is a nearly perfect [for me] distribution that is architecturally and fundamentally sound from the base upward. It is themed just enough, out of the box, to not annoy me with any irritating impositions. It really feels like I have been given keys to a fantastic house, albeit a bit spartan, waiting for me to make it my own. Technically speaking, there is nothing I dislike about Fedora. I could get along just fine in Fedora Land but openSUSE Land edges out for me with the Tumbleweed convenience and the broader hardware support.

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More in Tux Machines

Librem 5: Full Screen, Power and New Recruit

  • Better Fullscreen App Support on the Librem 5

    The phone’s shell is responsible for how apps are displayed. Even the smallest improvement to how apps render can have a positive impact on all Librem 5 applications – enabling more of the rich application ecosystem in PureOS to work better on mobile. [...] The UI is still accessible whenever it’s needed, but it’s now smart enough to know when to get out of the way. For non-convergent desktop apps you can employ UI scaling, which will allow you to run most FOSS apps on the Librem 5 in non-docked mode.

  • Librem 5 Power Management Improvements up to Jan 2020

    Power-management improvements continue to find their way into PureOS. We still have a ways to go before the battery can make it through a day, but progress is steady. Let’s go over a few of the latest changes.

  • Julian Sparber: Joining Purism

    This announcement is long overdue, but better late than never :) About 6 months ago I joined Purism, where I’m working on the Librem 5 phone. I’m in good company, since there are already a number of other fellow GNOME friends on the Librem 5 team, including Adrien Plazas, Tobias Bernard, and Mohammed Sadiq.

today's howtos

Games: Skul: The Hero Slayer, Plutocracy, Lurking in the Dark, Vagrus - The Riven Realms, Among Ripples: Shallow Waters, the Upcoming "Game Dev Unlocked"

  • Skul: The Hero Slayer has you swap your skull to gain new powers - now in Early Access

    Skul: The Hero Slayer is an action-packed rogue-lite platformer, where you play as the anti-hero Skul who sets off on a quest to single-handedly take on the Imperial Army and rescue his demon King from captivity.

  • 2D strategy and business simulator 'Plutocracy' now available on Linux

    Want to have a go at 'big business'? Plutocracy is a 2D strategy and business sim that will let you attempt to build up your business empire along with all the politics that comes with it. Developed by Redwood, who said they were directly inspired by Theodore Dreiser's the Trilogy of Desire, Plutocracy is currently in Early Access after running an IndieGoGo crowdfunding campaign our contributor BTRE covered on GOL back in 2018. Looks like it was a success to and as of this week, they delivered a Linux build that's available now on Steam too

  • Lurking in the Dark is a sweet idea for a game and it's now open source

    Lurking in the Dark, a clever 2D game about climbing a dark tower that was made during the GMTK Game Jam last year has been made open source. Created with Godot Engine, the idea is that you can only see a single tile in front of you so you have to watch out for monsters and traps. The developer mentioned on Twitter that due to a lot of interest and their plans to turn it into a full game were put on hold, the source code is now open for everyone.

  • Vagrus - The Riven Realms hits more milestones on Fig, funding big new features

    The hybrid Early Access/Crowdfunding model 'Open Access' on the Fig platform seems to be working really well for Vagrus - The Riven Realms. [...] Once they hit $60K they will introduce a manual save option, at $75K it will bring in the first part of their planned open-world campaign and more after that with plenty of future goals not yet announced. This mixture of releasing builds after new funding milestones is quite a clever idea, it keeps people interested and personally invested since they get to play while pulling in more people over time too.

  • Repair and manage an ecosystem in 'Among Ripples: Shallow Waters' now on Kickstarter

    Acting as a sequel to their free and much smaller game Among Ripples released back in 2015, Among Ripples: Shallow Waters is an eco-tycoon sim that's looking for your funding. With the state the world is in, a game about taking care of at least one small part of it gives me the good feels all over. The team at Eat Create Sleep say they're actually working with "real ecologists to create a simulation of something that could happen in real life", so there's some real science behind it.

  • Game Dev Unlocked, an upcoming blog and video series for aspiring game developers

    Following an interesting half-an-hour talk (that I recommend you to check), David Wehle, the creator of the third person short exploration adventure The First Tree [GOG, itch.io, Steam], recently made a formal announcement about his upcoming project: Game Dev Unlocked, a blog and video series aimed at helping aspiring indie game designers to overcome all the inherent challenges of such an enterprise, including technical aspects, marketing, etc.

Raspberry Pi 4: Chronicling the Desktop Experience – Retro Gaming – Week 17

This is a weekly blog about the Raspberry Pi 4 (“RPI4”), the latest product in the popular Raspberry Pi range of computers. I started my adventures with gaming in Week 15 of this blog where I evaluated home computer emulators. For this week, I’m going to look at a few retro games, all nestling in Raspbian’s repositories. While its quad-core BCM2711 system-on-chip has more powerful processing cores, and the first upgrade to the graphics processor in the project’s history, it’s important to be realistic with expectations about the RPI4’s gaming potential. Read more