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Red Hat

Red Hat: Education, Automation, RHEL 6.10 and More

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Red Hat
  • Red Hat, Lord Wandsworth College and University of Surrey collaborate

    Red Hat, the world’s leading provider of open source solutions, has announced its collaboration with Lord Wandsworth College (LWC), an independent school for girls and boys aged 11 to 18, and the University of Surrey, a public research university specialising in science, engineering, medicine and business, on the Open Schools Coding Competition, designed to inspire the next generation of coders and software developers. In so doing, the competition hopes to contribute to building the UK’s digital talent pool.

    The competition is now in its second year, with 10 schools and approximately 100 students in the UK taking part. The competition aims to engage children ahead of making their subject choices for GCSE, so is open to Key Stage 3 students. It challenges teams of students to use any free visual programming environment to create a gaming app that will help a charity of their choice. The competition enables participants to apply the basic principles of open source software development and open collaboration to solve a real world problem in a fun and competitive environment, with the opportunity to win a prize for their team and recognition for their school. In choosing a charitable cause, each student can gain a sense of how they can use digital skills to make their own contribution to addressing societal challenges and how open source technology and methodology can drive positive change in the world.

  • Red Hat Unveils Next-Generation Process Automation Offering
  • Red Hat Drives Mission-Critical Stability with Latest Update to Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6
  • Red Hat Data Grid on Three Clouds (the details behind the demo)

    If you saw or heard about the multi-cloud demo at Red Hat Summit 2018, this article details how we ran Red Hat Data Grid in active-active-active mode across three cloud providers. This set up enabled us to show a fail over between cloud providers in real time with no loss of data. In addition to Red Hat Data Grid, we used Vert.x (reactive programming), OpenWhisk (serverless), and Red Hat Gluster Storage (software-defined storage.)

  • RedHat stock falls after Raymond James downgrade

Fedora and Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat

Fedora: Anaconda Improvements, Greenboot, Fedora Scientific Vagrant Boxes and Abhishek

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Red Hat
  • Anaconda improvements in Fedora 28

    Fedora 28 was released last month, and the major update brought with it a raft of new features for the Fedora Installer (Anaconda). Like Fedora, Anaconda is a dynamic software project with new features and updates every release. Some changes are user visible, while others happen under the hood — making Anaconda more robust and prepared for future improvements.

  • Lorbus: Introducing: greenboot

    Not too long ago, I applied to Google Summer of Code for the student scholarship position together with a Fedora project ideated by Peter Robinson, who is the principal IoT architect at Red Hat, named Fedora IoT: Atomic Host Upgrade Daemon. As you may be guessing by now, I was very fortunate and the proposal was accepted! The coding phase started on the 14th of May and in this blog post I’ll try to give a little insight into my first month working on the project.

  • Pre-release Fedora Scientific Vagrant Boxes

    I am very excited to share that sometime back the Fedora project gave the go ahead on my idea of making Fedora Scientific available as Vagrant boxes starting with Fedora 29. This basically means (I think) that using Fedora Scientific in a virtual machine is even easier.

  • [Week 5] GSoC Status Report for Fedora App: Abhishek

Red Hat News

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Red Hat
  • An Open Source Load Balancer for OpenShift

    A highly-available deployment of OpenShift needs at least two load balancers: One to load balance the control plane (the master API endpoints) and one for the data plane (the application routers). In most on-premise deployments, we use appliance-based load balancers (such as F5 or Netscaler).

  • Red Hat Beefs Up Platform as a Service Suite

    Red Hat has begun shipping Red Hat Fuse 7, the next major release of its distributed, cloud-native integration solution, and introduced a new fully hosted low-code integration platform as a service (iPaaS) offering, Fuse Online. With Fuse 7, the vendor says expanding its integration capabilities natively to Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, an enterprise Kubernetes platform. Fuse gives customers a unified solution for creating, extending and deploying containerized integration services across hybrid cloud environments.

  • Red Hat ‘Fuses’ Low Code Development and Data Integration

    Red Hat, a provider of open source solutions, has announced Red Hat Fuse 7, the next major release of its distributed, cloud-native integration solution, and introduced a new fully hosted low-code integration platform as a service offering, Fuse Online. With Fuse 7, Red Hat is expanding its integration capabilities natively to Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, a comprehensive enterprise Kubernetes platform.

    Fuse gives customers a unified solution for creating, extending and deploying containerized integration services across hybrid cloud environments.

  • The GPL cooperation commitment and Red Hat projects

    As of today, all new Red Hat-initiated open source projects that opt to use GPLv2 or LGPLv2.1 will be expected to supplement the license with the cure commitment language of GPLv3. The cure language will live in a file in the project source tree and will function as an additional permission extended to users from the start.

    This is the latest development in an ongoing initiative within the open source community to promote predictability and stability in enforcement of GPL-family licenses. The “automatic termination” provision in GPLv2 and LGPLv2.x is often interpreted as terminating the license upon noncompliance without a grace period or other opportunity to correct the error in compliance. When the Free Software Foundation released GPLv2 in 1991, it held nearly all GPL-licensed copyrights, in part a consequence of the copyright assignment policy then in place for GNU project contributions. Long after the Linux kernel and many other non-GNU projects began to adopt the GPL and LGPL, the FSF was still the only copyright holder regularly engaged in license enforcement. Under those conditions, the automatic termination feature of GPLv2 section 4 may have seemed an appropriate means of encouraging license compliance.

  • Monness Believes Red Hat (NYSE: RHT) Still Has Room to Grow
  • Comparing Red Hat (RHT) & Autoweb (AUTO)
  • As Red Hat (RHT) Share Value Rose, Calamos Advisors Upped Its Position by $300,831; Chilton Capital Management Increases Stake in Equinix (EQIX)
  • Blair William & Co. IL Buys 23,279 Shares of Red Hat Inc (RHT)

Red Hat changes its open-source licensing rules

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Red Hat
OSS

From outside programming circles, software licensing may not seem important. In open-source, though, licensing is all important.

So, when leading Linux company Red Hat announces that -- from here on out -- all new Red Hat-initiated open-source projects that use the GNU General Public License(GPLv2) or GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL)v2.1 licenses will be expected to supplement the license with GPL version 3 (GPLv3)'s cure commitment language, it's a big deal.

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Fedora 29 To Fully Embrace The FreeDesktop.org Boot Loader Specification

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Red Hat

Adding to the growing list of features for Fedora 29 is a plan to fully support the FreeDesktop.org Boot Loader Specification and making use of their defined fragment files to populate boot-loader boot menu entries, including the kernel entries.

The FreeDesktop.org Boot Loader Specification is an existing spec for trying to allow a standardized boot configuration format between operating systems / Linux distributions that are based upon drop-in files. The goal has been to be "robust, simple, works without rewriting configuration files and is free of namespace clashes." The specification can be found on FreeDesktop.org and in its current form for the past two years.

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Fedora: Fedora 29, Linux 4.17 (Soon), Fedora vs Ubuntu

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Red Hat
  • Binutils 2.31 Slated For Fedora 29

    To little surprise given that Fedora Linux always strives to ship with a bleeding-edge GNU toolchain, for the Fedora 29 release this fall they are planning to make use of the yet-to-be-released Binutils 2.31.

  • Linux 4.17 Stable Has Been Settling Well, Coming Soon To Fedora

    Since the release of Linux 4.17 almost two weeks ago, I haven't heard of any horror stories, Linux 4.17 continues running excellent on all of my test systems, the 4.17.1 point release was quite small, and more distributions are gearing up to ship this latest kernel release.

  • [Older] Fedora vs Ubuntu

Server: Containers and 'Enterprise' GNU/Linux

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Red Hat
Server
  • Container and Kubernetes Security: It's Complicated

    Container technology is being increasingly used by organizations as a way to deploy applications and micro-services. The promise of containers is improved agility and portability, while potentially also reducing the attack surface. Though container technology can be helpful for security, it can also have its own set of risks.

    In a panel session at the recent Kubecon + CloudNativeCon EU event titled "Modern App Security Requires Containers" -- moderated by eSecurity Planet -- security experts from Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) project and Google debated what's wrong and what's right with container security.

  • Docker Defines Itself as the Open Choice for Containers at DockerCon 18

    Docker CEO Steve Singh kicked off his company's DockerCon 18 conference here today, offering the assembled crowd of container enthusiasts a clear vision of where Docker is going.

    For Docker Inc, the company behind the eponymous container system, a lot is at stake. This is the first DockerCon where the founder of the company, Solomon Hykes is not present. Hykes left Docker in March, as the company direction has increasingly focused on enterprise adoption and commercial market growth.

  • How to select the right enterprise Linux

    The decision to use any modern edition of that operating system, generally spoken as RHEL with a silent H, is usually based on a need for component stability, paid technical support, and long-term version support, said Red Hat's Ron Pacheco, director of global product management.

  • CentOS 7.4 & kernel 4.x - Worth the risk?

    The reasons why we have gathered here are many. A few weeks ago, my CentOS distro went dead. With the new kernel containing Spectre patches, it refused to load the Realtek Wireless drivers into memory. Moreover, patches also prevent manual compilation. This makes the distro useless, as it has no network connection. Then, in my CentOS 7.4 upgrade article - which was flawless, including the network piece, go figure - I wondered about the use of new, modern 4.x kernels in CentOS. Sounds like we have a real incentive here.

    In this tutorial, I will attempt to install and use the latest mainline kernel (4.16 when I typed this). The benefits should be many. I've seen improved performance, responsiveness and battery life in newer kernels compared to the 3.x branch. The Realtek Wireless woes of the disconnect kind (like a Spielberg movie) were also fixed in kernel 4.8.7 onwards, so that's another thing. Lastly, this would make CentOS a lean, mean and modern beast. Bravely onwards!

    [...]

    Now, I can breathe with relief, as I've delivered on my promise, and I gave you a full solution to the CentOS 7.4 Realtek issues post upgrade. I do not like to end articles on a cliffhanger, and definitely not carry the solution over to a follow-up article, but in this rare case, it was necessary. The mainline kernel upgrade is a topic of its own.

    The kernel installation worked fine, and thereafter, we seem to have gained on many fronts. The network issues are fully resolved, we can compile again, the performance seems improved despite worse figures in the system monitor, battery life and stability are not impaired in any way, and the CentOS box has fresh new life, wrapped in modern features and latest software. And none of this was meant to be in the first place, because CentOS is a server distro. Well, I hope you are happy. The one outstanding mission - Plasma 5. Once we have that, we can proudly claim to have created the ultimate Linux distro hybrid monster. Take care.

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A brief history of text-based games and open source

The Interactive Fiction Technology Foundation (IFTF) is a non-profit organization dedicated to the preservation and improvement of technologies enabling the digital art form we call interactive fiction. When a Community Moderator for Opensource.com suggested an article about IFTF, the technologies and services it supports, and how it all intersects with open source, I found it a novel angle to the decades-long story I’ve so often told. The history of IF is longer than—but quite enmeshed with—the modern FOSS movement. I hope you’ll enjoy my sharing it here. Read more

Fact check: Linux developer accused of pedophilia in fake blog posts

Followers of some of Reddit’s Linux-devoted subreddits were recently greeted with an unusual and disturbing discovery: pro-pedophilia and anti-Semitic blog posts from the developer of Linux Exherbo, a Linux distribution with native cross-compiling package management. A website under the developer’s name featured a number of unsavory blog posts. Fortunately, the blog appears to be fake. The developer, Bryan Østergaard, normally posts updates to a LiveJournal page under the username kloeri, although the last update dates 2014. Earlier this week, someone shared to Reddit a different blog attributed to Østergaard with a handful of more recent blog posts explaining “why” he decided to create Exherbo. Read more

Open source code worth $600m contributed to Apache

Open source code valued at over $600 million was delivered by volunteer project contributors to the Apache Software Foundation (ASF) in a single 12-month period. That's according to the Apache Software Foundation's (ASF) annual report for its 2018 fiscal year, which ended on 30 April. The report was released last week. ASF was established in 1999 and claims to be the world's largest open source foundation with more than 300 freely available, enterprise-wide projects that serve as the backbone for some of the most visible and widely used applications in computing today. Read more

RIP, Printrbot

  • Printrbot has shut down
    Printrbot, a popular Kickstarter-backed 3D printer company, has shut down, leaving only a barebones website and little explanation.
  • Pioneering desktop 3D printer maker Printrbot closes it doors
  • Printrbot Closes Doors, Saddening 3D Printing Fans Everywhere
    In a competitive market, it’s hard for any company to stay ahead of the others, and it’s a sad fact that even some of the most popular and long-lived companies succumb to heavy weather. Printrbot, founded in 2011, had legions of fans who loved its printers’ affordability, ease of assembly and use, and open source freedom. Printrbot 3D printers were 3D printers for the people – only a few hundred dollars, they provided access to 3D printing technology for people who hadn’t been able to afford it before, and although they were simple, they were high quality. Best of all, you could make them your own, tinkering with them and creating new and unique machines, as so many users did. The company was ethical, direct and honest. Some open source 3D printer companies just download files and don’t share. Printrbot dutifully shared its source files and was a rare true open source company.
  • 3D Printing Community saddened by closure of Printrbot 3D printers
    Open source 3D printer manufacturer Printrbot has announced the close of its business, citing poor sales as the reason for the decision. A simple statement on the Printrbot website from founder Brook Drumm reads: “Printrbot is closed. Low sales led to hard decisions. We will be forever grateful to all the people we met and served over the years. Thank you all.” For the time being, Drumm will reportedly be “unreachable” for comments, and plans to share his views and plans for this “final chapter” in due course. The 3D Printing Community however has take to social media in mourning of the company, with figures including Joel Telling (YouTube’s 3D Printing Nerd), Thomas Sanladerer, and Dr. Adrian Bowyer himself weighing in on the close.
  • Printrbot Shuts Down After Seven Years of Creating Open Source 3D Printers
    Printrbot, the 3D printing manufacturer which was founded in 2011 with the launch of its original Printrbot printer on Kickstarter, has announced that it's now sadly closing its doors.