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Red Hat

Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • RPKG guide from Tito user

    Since the beginning of the rpkg project, it was known as a client tool for DistGit. Times changed and a new era for rpkg is here. It was enhanced with project management features, so we can safely label it as a tito alternative.

    A features review, pros and cons and user guide is a theme for a whole new article. In this short post, I, as a long-time tito user, want to show rpkg alternatives for the tito commands, that I frequently use.

  • All-Flash Platform-as-a-Service: Pure Storage and Red Hat OpenShift Reference Architecture

    Pure Storage® is excited to announce a reference architecture for Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, using both Pure Storage FlashArray and FlashBlade™ to provide all the underlying storage requirements.

  • Red Hat OpenStack Platform 13 Delivers Long-Term Support

    The Red Hat OpenStack Platform 13 release was officially announced here on May 21, bringing along with it new features and expanded support for the open-source cloud platform.

    In a video interview with eWEEK, Mark McLoughlin, senior director of engineering for OpenStack at Red Hat, details what's new in the release and what is set to come in the next release. Red Hat OpenStack Platform 13 is based on the upstream OpenStack Queens release that first became generally available on Feb. 28.

    "The key thing for the OpenStack Platform 13 release is that it is a long life release," McLoughlin said.

  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) stock remained among YTD Quarterly with rise of 12.54%
  • 10 tasks for running containers on Atomic Host

    Unlike a virtual machine, which includes an entire operating system, a container is meant to hold only the software needed to run an application. Therefore, to run a container efficiently and securely, you need an operating system that provides secure container services and acts as a foundation for running containers. One operating system developed for that task is Atomic Host.

    Think of Atomic Host as a secure, specialized version of Fedora, CentOS, or Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL). Its best use is to provide a reliable and easily upgradable operating system for running containers. Different formats of Atomic Host are available to run on anything from bare metal to a variety of cloud environments. With an Atomic Host system installed, you can use the docker command as you would on other container-enabled systems. However, Atomic Host also comes with an additional command called atomic, which expands what you can do with containers.

Red Hat and Fedora News

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Red Hat News

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  • “Ultimate Private Cloud” Demo, Under The Hood!

    At the recent Red Hat Summit in San Francisco, and more recently the OpenStack Summit in Vancouver, the OpenStack engineering team worked on some interesting demos for the keynote talks.

    I’ve been directly involved with the deployment of Red Hat OpenShift Platform on bare metal using the Red Hat OpenStack Platform director deployment/management tool, integrated with openshift-ansible. I’ll give some details of this demo, the upstream TripleO features related to this work, and insight around the potential use-cases.

  • Discover the possibilities of hybrid cloud during a joint virtual event with Red Hat & Microsoft [Ed: [Ed: When Red Hat pus Microsoft executives at top positions inside Red Hat...]
  • Red Hat OpenStack Customer Survey 2018: containers, technical support top of mind

    In 2016, we surveyed our customer base on their use of OpenStack in production, getting a pulse-check on the top considerations, expectations, and benefits of a Red Hat OpenStack Platform deployment. With 2018 marking five years of Red Hat OpenStack Platform, we checked back in with our customers to see if their experiences or expectations of OpenStack have changed. Our survey found:

  • Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst On How He Plans To Win The Container Market
  • Juniper, Red Hat Tighten Integration to Fend Off VMware

    Juniper Networks and Red Hat have tightened their integration efforts in a move to help ease enterprise adoption of cloud-native platforms and bolster their own offerings against the likes of VMware and Cisco.

    The latest platform integration includes the Red Hat OpenStack Platform; Red Hat’s OpenShift Container Platform running as a platform-as-a-service (PaaS) on top of or next to the OpenStack platform depending on deployment architecture; and Juniper’s Contrail Enterprise Multi-Cloud platform running as the networking and security layer to unify those together. This integration is designed as a managed system to help deploy and run applications and services on any virtual machine (VM), container platform, and any cloud environment.

  • Red Hat OpenStack HCI Targets Telco Hybrid Cloud, 5G Deployments

    Red Hat today rolled out a hyperconverged infrastructure (HCI) platform based on OpenStack compute and Ceph storage. The new product targets service providers looking to deploy virtual network functions (VNFs) and 5G technologies on top of open source software.

    Launched at this week’s OpenStack Summit, the Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud combines Red Hat OpenStack Platform 13 and Red Hat Ceph Storage 3 into one product. Red Hat says it is the largest contributor to both open source projects.

  • Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud Bridges Datacenters and Edge Deployments
  • GSoC 2018: Week 1

    This time, I am working on improving the Fedora Community App with the Fedora project. It’s been a week since we started off our coding on may 14.

    The Fedora App is a central location for Fedora users and innovators to stay updated on The Fedora Project. News updates, social posts, Ask Fedora, as well as articles from Fedora Magazine are all held under this app.

Ubuntu's Mark Shuttleworth pulls no punches on Red Hat and VMware in OpenStack cloud

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Ubuntu

At OpenStack Summit in Vancouver, Canada, the opening keynote speeches started out the way they usually do. There were demos, there were companies saying how their latest release was the best thing since sliced bread... and then, there was Canonical CEO and Ubuntu Linux founder Mark Shuttleworth. Shuttleworth came out firing at two of his major enterprise OpenStack competitors: Red Hat and VMware.

Shuttleworth opened quietly enough, saying, "Mission is to remove all the friction from deploying OpenStack. We can deliver OpenStack deployments with two people in less two weeks anywhere in the world." So far, so typical for a keynote speech.

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Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

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Canonical founder Mark Shuttleworth takes aim at VMware and Red Hat at OpenStack Summit

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Server
Ubuntu

“Google, IBM, Microsoft [are] all investing and innovating to drive down the cost of infrastructure. Every single one of those companies engages with Canonical to deliver public services,” he said.

“Not one of them engages with VMware to offer those public services – they can’t afford to. Clearly they have the cash, but they have to compete – and so does your private cloud.”

To capitalise on this trend, the firm is in the throes of rolling out a migration service to help users shift from VMware to a “fully managed” version of Canonical’s Ubuntu OpenStack distribution, which Shuttleworth said costs half as much to run.

“When we take out VMware, and displace VMware, we are regularly told that a fully managed OpenStack solution costs half of the equivalent VMware estate [to run],” he added.

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Red Hat News

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Red Hat
  • Red Hat Summit: Lowering the risk of monolith to microservices

    When considering risk, we think we know the bad things that can happen and the probabilities of those bad things actually happening. Christian defines a monolith as a large application developed over many years by different teams that delivers proven business value while being very difficult to update and maintain. Its architecture, elegant at one point, has eroded over time. That makes it difficult to assess the risk of migrating a monolith.

  • Red Hat embraces open source play in Raleigh with Marbles Children’s Museum

    When you think Red Hat, you don’t instantly think of children’s museums. So it may surprise you that on May 16, Red Hat president and CEO, Jim Whitehurst, took the stage at the annual conference for the Association of Children's Museums (ACM) to deliver the keynote address.

    More than 1,000 executives and representatives from children's museums around the globe gathered at the Raleigh Convention Center for the event themed, “Open Source Play, Sharing the Creative Code.” Open source play is the intersection between children's museums and open source innovation that is driving the technology industry. The event explored how innovation is fueled by the open exchange of ideas, engaged participation and strength of community, and how those concepts can be brought to the development of play experiences and people management at museums.

  • Red Hat OpenStack Platform celebrates five years of accelerating private and hybrid clouds

    This summer, OpenStack turns eight -- and it’s hard to believe how far the open source project has come in under a decade. It continues to be one of the most popular open source projects to date, according to the OpenStack Foundation, and one that is used in production by companies around the globe, including nearly half of all Fortune 100 companies.

  • Red Hat Ships OpenStack Platform 13 for Enterprise Digital Transformation

    OpenStack Summit Vancouver 2018 - Red Hat, Inc. today announced Red Hat OpenStack Platform 13, the latest version of Red Hat's massively scalable and agile cloud Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) solution. Based on the OpenStack "Queens" release, Red Hat OpenStack Platform 13 provides a powerful foundation for enterprises using hybrid cloud for digital transformation strategies, helps to minimize the growing pains often involved with new technology adoption with its new Fast Forward upgrades feature, and is designed to also improve integration across the emerging technology stack.

  • Integration drives Red Hat 3scale API Management platform roadmap

    Nothing stands still in technology, so Red Hat API Infrastructure head and Senior Director Steve Willmott has a full plate. On his immediate agenda are the alignment of 3scale with Red Hat JBoss Fuse integration platforms, API gateway evolution and the disruptions driven by service mesh technology.

  • Speculative Store Bypass explained: what it is, how it works

Lucky 13? Red Hat releases Red Hat OpenStack Platform 13

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In a day filled with news about companies adopting OpenStack Queens, Red Hat, a leading OpenStack Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) cloud, stood out with its release of its long-term support Red Hat OpenStack Platform (RHOP) 13 since it's one of OpenStack's most stalwart supporters.

At OpenStack Summit in Vancouver, Canada, Red Hat announced RHOP 13's release. RHOP is scheduled to be available in June via the Red Hat Customer Portal and as a component of both Red Hat Cloud Infrastructure and Red Hat Cloud Suite.

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Also: VMware ready to release new OpenStack cloud program

Red Hat News: KVM, OpenStack Platform 13 and More

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Red Hat and Fedora News

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat Woes and Fedora 29 Plans

  • Shares of open-source giant Red Hat pounded on weaker outlook
  • Fedora 29 Aims To Offer Up Modules For Everyone
    The latest Fedora 29 feature proposal is about offering "modules for everyone" across all Fedora editions. The "modules for everyone" proposal would make it where all Fedora installations have modular repositories enabled by default. Up to now the modular functionality was just enabled by default in Fedora Server 28. The modular functionality allows Fedora users to choose alternate versions of popular software, such as different versions of Node.js and other server software components where you might want to stick to a particular version.

GNU Make, FSFE Newsletter, and FSF's BLAG Removal

  • Linux Fu: The Great Power of Make
    Over the years, Linux (well, the operating system that is commonly known as Linux which is the Linux kernel and the GNU tools) has become much more complicated than its Unix roots. That’s inevitable, of course. However, it means old-timers get to slowly grow into new features while new people have to learn all in one gulp. A good example of this is how software is typically built on a Linux system. Fundamentally, most projects use make — a program that tries to be smart about running compiles. This was especially important when your 100 MHz CPU connected to a very slow disk drive would take a day to build a significant piece of software. On the face of it, make is pretty simple. But today, looking at a typical makefile will give you a headache, and many projects use an abstraction over make that further obscures things.
  • FSFE Newsletter June 2018
  • About BLAG's removal from our list of endorsed distributions
    We recently updated our list of free GNU/Linux distributions to add a "Historical" section. BLAG Linux and GNU, based on Fedora, joined the list many years ago. But the maintainers no longer believe they can keep things running at this time. As such, they requested that they be removed from our list. The list helps users to find operating systems that come with only free software and documentation, and that do not promote any nonfree software. Being added to the list means that a distribution has gone through a rigorous screening process, and is dedicated to diligently fixing any freedom issues that may arise.

Servers: Kubernetes, Oracle's Cloudwashing and Embrace of ARM

  • Bloomberg Eschews Vendors For Direct Kubernetes Involvement
    Rather than use a managed Kubernetes service or employ an outsourced provider, Bloomberg has chosen to invest in deep Kubernetes expertise and keep the skills in-house. Like many enterprise organizations, Bloomberg originally went looking for an off-the-shelf approach before settling on the decision to get involved more deeply with the open source project directly. "We started looking at Kubernetes a little over two years ago," said Steven Bower, Data and Infrastructure Lead at Bloomberg. ... "It's a great execution environment for data science," says Bower. "The real Aha! moment for us was when we realized that not only does it have all these great base primitives like pods and replica sets, but you can also define your own primitives and custom controllers that use them."
  • Oracle is changing how it reports cloud revenues, what's it hiding? [iophk: "probably Microsoft doing this too" (cloudwashing)]
     

    In short: Oracle no longer reports specific revenue for cloud PaaS, IaaS and SaaS, instead bundling them all into one reporting line which it calls 'cloud services and licence support'. This line pulled in 60% of total revenue for the quarter at $6.8 billion, up 8% year-on-year, for what it's worth.

  • Announcing the general availability of Oracle Linux 7 for ARM
    Oracle is pleased to announce the general availability of Oracle Linux 7 for the ARM architecture.
  • Oracle Linux 7 Now Ready For ARM Servers
    While Red Hat officially launched RHEL7 for ARM servers last November, on Friday Oracle finally announced the general availability of their RHEL7-derived Oracle Linux 7 for ARM. Oracle Linux 7 Update 5 is available for ARM 64-bit (ARMv8 / AArch64), including with their new Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel Release 5 based on Linux 4.14.

Graphics: XWayland, Ozone-GBM, Freedreno, X.Org, RadeonSI

  • The Latest Batch Of XWayland / EGLStream Improvements Merged
    While the initial EGLStreams-based support for using the NVIDIA proprietary driver with XWayland was merged for the recent X.Org Server 1.20 release, the next xorg-server release will feature more improvements.
  • Making Use Of Chrome's Ozone-GBM Intel Graphics Support On The Linux Desktop
    Intel open-source developer Joone Hur has provided a guide about using the Chrome OS graphics stack on Intel-based Linux desktop systems. In particular, using the Chrome OS graphics stack on the Linux desktop is primarily about using the Ozone-GBM back-end to Ozone that allows for direct interaction with Intel DRM/KMS support and evdev for input.
  • Freedreno Reaches OpenGL ES 3.1 Support, Not Far From OpenGL 3.3
    The Freedreno Gallium3D driver now supports all extensions required by OpenGL ES 3.1 and is also quite close to supporting desktop OpenGL 3.3.
  • X.Org Is Looking For A North American Host For XDC2019
    If software development isn't your forte but are looking to help out a leading open-source project while logistics and hospitality are where you excel, the X.Org Foundation is soliciting bids for the XDC2019 conference. The X.Org Foundation is looking for proposals where in North America that the annual X.Org Developers' Conference should be hosted in 2019. This year it's being hosted in Spain and with the usual rotation it means that in 2019 they will jump back over the pond.
  • RadeonSI Compatibility Profile Is Close To OpenGL 4.4 Support
    It was just a few days ago that the OpenGL compatibility profile support in Mesa reached OpenGL 3.3 compliance for RadeonSI while now thanks to the latest batch of patches from one of the Valve Linux developers, it's soon going to hit OpenGL 4.4. Legendary open-source graphics driver contributor Timothy Arceri at Valve has posted 11 more patches for advancing RadeonSI's OpenGL compatibility profile support, the alternative context to the OpenGL core profile that allows mixing in deprecated OpenGL functionality. The GL compatibility profile mode is generally used by long-standing workstation software and also a small subset of Linux games.