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Red Hat

Red Hat News

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Fedora: Some Fedora 29 Plans, Report for Fedora App, and Flatpak Outline

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Red Hat
  • Fedora 29 Aims To Better Support FPGAs

    A rather late self-contained feature proposal for the in-development Fedora 29 is to better support FPGAs.

    Given the growing number of devices appearing with onboard FPGAs thanks to machine/deep learning, AI, and other workloads that can be accelerated on FPGAs, Fedora 29 is aiming to better support them. The support will be focused on FPGAs with good upstream kernel support and utilizing the FPGA manager framework that is vendor-neutral.

  • [Week 9] GSoC Status Report for Fedora App: Amitosh

    You can now subscribe to a particular calendar from the Fedora app!. No more missed meetings. We also take care of converting the date and time to the local timezone so that you get the reminders at the correct time.

    Subscribing to a calendar automatically syncs all events for a calendar on FedoCal to the device calendar. If the device calendar syncs with a sync provider such as Google calendar, you will get the notification in all synced devices. If a meeting is deleted or removed, the reminder will dismissed as well.

  • Flatpak – a look behind the portal

    There are several principles that have guided the design of the existing portals.

    Keep the user in control

    To achieve this, most portals will show a dialog to let the user accept or deny the applications’ request. This is not a hard rule — in some cases, a dialog is just not practical.

    Avoid yes/no questions

    Direct questions about permissions tend to be dismissed without much thought, since they get in the way of the task at hand. Therefore, portals avoid this kind of question whenever possible and instead just let the user get on with the task.

    For example, when an app is requesting to open a file on the host, we just present the user with a fille chooser. By selecting a file, the user implicitly grants the application access to the file. Or he can cancel the file selection and implicitly deny the applications’ request.

    Don’t be annoying

    Nothing is worse than having to answer the same question over and over. Portals make use of a database to record previous decisions and avoid asking repeatedly for the same thing.

    [...]

    If you want to explore how portals work, or just need to double-check which files an app has access to, flatpak has tools that let you do so conveniently.

Red Hat: Interview, Releases, Events, Compliance and Finance

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Red Hat News

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An update from Fedora Workstation land

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Feral Interactive, one of the leading Linux game companies, released a tool they call gamemode for Linux not long ago. Since we want gamers to be first class citizens in Fedora Workstation we ended up going back and forth internally a bit about what to do about it, basically discussing if there was another way to resolve the problem even more seamlessly than gamemode. In the end we concluded that while the ideal solution would be to have the default CPU governor be able to deal with games better, we also realized that the technical challenge games posed to the CPU governor, by having a very uneven workload, is hard to resolve automatically and not something we have the resources currently to take a deep dive into. So in the end we decided that just packaging gamemode was the most reasonable way forward. So the package is lined up for the next batch update in Fedora 28 so you should soon be able to install it and for Fedora Workstation 29 we are looking at including it as part of the default install.

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Red Hat and CentOS Fix Kernel Bug in Latest OS Versions, Urge Users to Update

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OS
Red Hat
Security

It would appear the there was a bug in the previous Linux kernel update for the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.5 and CentOS Linux 7.5 releases, which was released to address the Spectre V4 security vulnerability, making connection tracking information to not function correctly, which could lead to connectivity loss and leaking of configuration properties related to the respective connection tracking into other namespaces.

"Previously, the connection tracking information was not cleared properly for packets forwarded to another network namespace," said Red Hat in an advisory. "Packets that were marked with the "NOTRACK" target in one namespace were excluded from connection tracking even in the new namespace. Consequently, a loss of connectivity occasionally occurred, depending on the packet filtering ruleset of the other network namespaces."

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Also: Red Hat Open-Sources Scanner That Checks Linux Binaries For Spectre V1 Potential

Red Hat Continues Driving Wonderful Innovations In Fedora Workstation

Red Hat Leftovers

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RPM And Yum Are A Big Deal For IBM i. Here’s Why

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Red Hat
Server

By now you’ve probably heard about Yum and RPM, the new processes that IBM will use to deliver open source software to IBM i customers. But you may have questions about how the process works, and what the benefits will be. IT Jungle talked with IBM’s open source guru Jesse Gorzinski to get the low down on why the new tech is so important to the platform.

RPM, which stands for Red Hat Package Manager, is a piece of software created more than 20 years that allows customers in that Linux community to more easily distribute and install the various pieces of software required to create a working Linux environment. Over the years, RPM use has migrated beyond the Red Hat community to other Linux and Unix environments (including AIX), and has essentially become a de facto standard for distributing software in the open source world.

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Also: Red Hat Announces Ansible Engine 2.6 with Simplified Connections to Network APIs and Automation across Windows & Cloud

Red Hat: APAC Ansible, and More

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Yum Won't Be Dropped For Fedora 29

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There had been plans drafted to finish dropping Yum 3 in Fedora now that DNF is quite mature as the next-generation package manager, but that isn't happening now until at least Fedora 30.

Fedora 29 isn't eliminating Yum since it's a fairly disruptive change at this point in the cycle, there still are some important infrastructure components depending upon Yum like Koji, Pungi, and others, among other logistics to work through.

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More in Tux Machines

Microsoft Uses Canonical/Snap as a 'Ramp' Against Bash/UNIX/Linux

  • PowerShell launches as a snap
    PowerShell Core from Microsoft is now available for Linux as a Snap. Built on the .NET Framework, PowerShell is an open source task-based command-line shell and scripting language with the goal of being the ubiquitous language for managing hybrid cloud assets. It is designed specifically for system administrators and power-users to rapidly automate the administration of multiple operating systems and the processes related to the applications that run on those operating systems.
  • PowerShell Core now available as a Snap package
    The goal of PowerShell Core is to be the ubiquitous language for managing your assets in the hybrid cloud. That’s why we’ve worked to make it available on many operating systems, architectures, and flavors of Linux, macOS, and Windows as possible.
  • Microsoft's PowerShell Available on Ubuntu as a Snap, Here's How to Install It
    Canonical and Microsoft announced today that PowerShell automation and configuration management system is now available as a Snap package for Ubuntu Linux and other Snap-enabled GNU/Linux distributions. Consisting of a cross-platform command-line shell and related scripting language, as well as a framework for dealing with cmdlets, Microsoft's PowerShell works on Windows, macOS, and Linux platforms to allow power-users and system administrators to have better and automated control over the administration of several operating systems.
  • Microsoft's PowerShell Now Available On Ubuntu In Snap Form
    Canonical and Microsoft have just announced that PowerShell Core is now available for Ubuntu users in Snap format. Back in the summer of 2016, Microsoft open-sourced PowerShell with plans to support Linux. PowerShell has been available on Linux for a while now without too much adoption while now it's available in Snap form for making it easy to deploy on Ubuntu and other Snap-supported platforms.

Games Leftovers

Linux Mint Updates

  • [Linux Mint] Monthly News – July 2018
    A mistimed MESA update in Xenial temporarily broke Ubuntu and Linux Mint upgrades. We were able to block it on the 7th of July, and ask people to revert the upgrade with Timeshift. On the 9th, everything was resolved, and the upgrade path was fixed and re-opened. More recently, a grub update triggered an issue in one of our own packages. That issue could only be triggered by a new grub update and so it had gone undetected during QA and the BETA test. Although it was fixed in a matter of hours in the repositories, it still affects our installation ISO images and it breaks EFI installations when the live session is connected to the Internet. The release notes were updated to ask people to install offline. New 64-bit ISO images for Linux Mint 19 Cinnamon, MATE and Xfce were produced with the fixed package and they passed QA yesterday. These new ISOs will replace the current images in the days to come. Be careful with Kernel 4.15.0-24. A critical issue causes some computers to boot really slowly, or not to boot at all. Ubuntu is aware of it and working on a fix. We’ve also received negative feedback from the 4.15 kernel series in Mint 18.x (based on Ubuntu Xenial). Although Ubuntu decided to switch the HWE series towards it, the 4.15 series doesn’t appear to support some proprietary drivers yet (nvidia-3.04 and nvidia-340 among them). We’re also aware of regressions in the Bionic base affecting VPN, Samba, Wine (recently fixed). Ubuntu 18.04 is a brand new base and we’re sure it will settle, receive bug fixes and get more mature with time. Of course our attention is mostly focused on the problems and we quickly forget about all the improvements. We had a great Linux Mint 19 release, we also received a huge amount of positive feedback and we’ve seen many great changes when moving from 16.04 to 18.04.
  • Linux Mint Debian Edition 3 Is On The Way, Cinnamon 4.0 Working On Speed
    The Linux Mint team has shared a routine status update about the work they have been engaged in over the past month, including dealing with some nasty package updates and readying the beta of Linux Mint Debian Edition 3 (LMDE 3). This month they had to deal with some headaches causing issues stemming from Ubuntu stable release updates around Mesa and GRUB in particular. There's also been a kernel problem to deal with, among other regressions. But for those that are fans of Linux Mint Debian Edition whereby the distribution uses a Debian based over Ubuntu LTS, the LMDE 3 release is on the way. The developers believe the LMDE 3 Beta should surface by the end of July. Additionally, they plan to ship LMDE 3 both with their own live installer as well as a Calamares-based installer option.
  • Free eBook from Packt - Linux Mint Essentials

Play Addictive Puzzle Game 2048 in Linux [GUI and Terminal]

Popular mobile puzzle game 2048 can also be played on Ubuntu and Linux distributions. Heck! You can even play 2048 in Linux terminal. Don’t blame me if your productivity goes down because of this addictive game. Read more