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Red Hat

Red Hat: Alibaba, CRI-O, Silencing Critics

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Red Hat

Red Hat and Servers: India, China, Docker and Kubernetes

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Red Hat
Server

Korora 26 Bloat - More is less or less is more?

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Red Hat
Reviews

Korora 26 Bloat is a noble concept, but it does not solve the fundamental problem it aims to solve: make Fedora usable. It tries to minimize the wreck that is Fedora 26 and fails to do so. Additionally, it introduces problems that the original did not have, making an even bigger mess.
Korora comes with a slew of ergonomics issues, flaking hardware support, too much actual bloat, tons of niggles and issues that are technically Fedora's legacy, and then the horrible Nvidia support that is just embarrassing in 2017. To answer my own question, more is less in this case, and there isn't a justifiable reason why you should prefer Korora over Fedora, nor why you should use it against the likes of Ubuntu, Kubuntu or Mint. Alas, this is not a good release, 2/10. Unusable, which is a shame, because I did like what Korora managed to do in the past. But it just shows how fragile the Linux world is. Proper distro release QA is a joke, regressions are nothing but a silent excuse to move on and churn out more bad code, almost like industrial protein, and this is so depressing I sometimes wonder why I even bother.

Anyway, to sum it up, Fedora 26 is worse than its predecessors, and Korora 26 is both worse than its own forefathers and the original article it seeks to tame, with appalling support for proprietary graphics drivers and other distros in a multi-boot setup that I really cannot recommend it. The cosmetic issues are also important, but in the end, the real deal breaker is the hardware side. Waiting for Korora 27. Peace.

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Red Hat's Growth and New Fedora Packages

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Red Hat
  • Red Hat continues steady march toward $5 billion revenue goal

    The last time I spoke to Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst, in June 2016, he had set a pretty audacious goal for his company to achieve $5 billion in revenue. At the time, that seemed a bit far-fetched. After all, his company had just become the first open-source company to surpass $2 billion in revenue. Getting to five represented a significant challenge because, as he pointed out, the bigger you get, the harder it becomes to keep the growth trajectory going.

    But the company has continued to thrive and is on track to pass $3 billion in revenue some time in the next couple of quarters. Red Hat is best known for creating a version of Linux designed specifically for the enterprise, but it has begun adapting to the changing world out there with cloud and containers — and as its RHEL (Red Hat Enterprise Linux) customers start to change the way they work (ever so slowly), they are continuing to use Red Hat for these new technologies. As Whitehurst told me, that’s not a coincidence.

  • New packages in Fedora: rtags, renderdoc

Red Hat and Fedora: Alibaba and Fedora 27 Plans

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Red Hat
  • Alibaba Cloud, Red Hat look to boost flexibility with open source

    Alibaba Cloud customers will soon be able to harness the power and flexibility of Red Hat’s open source solutions following a tie-up between the two companies.

    The tie-up will see Alibaba Cloud join the Red Hat Certified Cloud and Service Provider program, joining a host of other big name tech companies who offer Red Hat-tested and validated solutions.

  • Alibaba Cloud to offer, host Red Hat software

    Chinese internet giant has joined Red Hat's cloud partner ecosystem and will offer the latter's open source products to Alibaba Cloud customers as well as host Red Hat customers on its cloud platform.

  • Can These Stocks Continue To Spark? – Red Hat, Inc. (RHT), Adobe Systems Incorporated (ADBE)
  • AAC support will be available in Fedora Workstation 27!

    So I am really happy to announce another major codec addition to Fedora Workstation 27 namely the addition of the codec called AAC. As you might have seen from Tom Callaways announcement this has just been cleared for inclusion in Fedora.

    For those not well versed in the arcane lore of audio codecs AAC is the codec used for things like iTunes and is found in a lot of general media files online. AAC stands for Advanced Audio Coding and was created by the MPEG working group as the successor to mp3. Especially due to Apple embracing the format there is a lot of files out there using it and thus we wanted to support it in Fedora too.

  • Fedora Linux Can Finally Offer AAC Audio Codec Support

    Fedora is now able to bundle and offer a specific AAC audio codec implementation as a package for its Linux distribution.

    With Fedora always striving for free software and ensuring its legal state is in order due to Red Hat's control, it was only earlier this year Fedora was legally allowed to begin offering full MP3 support for both decode/encode along with AC3 support while last year it received H.264 support. The latest multimedia expansion for Fedora is now being able to distribute an AAC codec.

  • Fedora 27 bekommt Support für AAC [Ed: in German]
  • Taking Stock, Making Plans.

    When I got started contributing to open source communities it was with the Fedora Project and specifically the Docs team. I have not been anywhere near as active with Fedora lately and I miss it. I still consider myself an active Ambassador with each class I teach but I have not really contributed through content or formal activities lately. I am actually looking for a new challenge though, rather than returning to an old stomping ground, and probably with a smaller project. I dabbled in an Apache Hadoop ecosystem project for a bit and I still follow that mailing list but I never really got into that community. Melding open source and security is ideal, though I have really enjoyed the past year where I jumped into automation with Ansible and containers with OpenShift. The search continues.

Red Hat and Fedora News

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Red Hat and Fedora News

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Red Hat
  • Red Hat Updates Container Storage Platform as Market Strives for Maturity

    Red Hat’s container push continues with an announced update to its storage component. This follows the recent update to the Red Hat OpenShift Container platform.

  • 2017 Red Hat Government Symposium to Highlight the Role of Open Source in Meeting the Challenges of Government IT
  • A few fall conferences

    I was on the planning committee for Linux Plumbers so I ended up doing a bunch of behinds the scenes work in addition to the hallway track and going to the occasional session. Jon Corbet gave a talk about the kernel's limits to growth. He gave a version of this talk at Linaro Connect and I gave some thoughts about this previously. Most of my opinions there still stand. Grant Likely held a BoF about the upcoming ARM EBBR. If you've been following the arm64 server space, you may have heard of SBBR which is a boot specification for arm64 servers. The EBBR is something similar for embedded devices. As a Fedora maintainer, I'm happy to see this moving forward to make booting arm64 SBCs easier. There was a discussion about contiguous memory allocation for DMA. Some hardware vendors have discovered they get better performance if they use a contiguous block of memory despite possibly having an IOMMU. The proposal was to use the MAP_CONTIG with mmap to get appropriate memory. There wasn't a conclusion and discussion is ongoing on the mailing list.

  • New Adventures: Ansible Edition

    I am honored, excited, nervous, humbled, and over all elated to announce that starting December 1, 2017 I will be a member of the Ansible Core Development Team at Red Hat where I will work primarily on Upstream Ansible (what most people would likely know as just 'Ansible', 'Ansible Core', or 'The Ansible Project' depending on who you talk to).

  • DevConf.CZ 2018 CfP is OPEN

Red Hat News

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Red Hat and Fedora News

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Latest Open Access LWN: Fedora, Linux Kernel, and Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Red Hat
  • Fedora's foundations meet proprietary drivers

    The Fedora project's four "foundations" are named "Freedom", "Friends", "Features", and "First". Among other things, they commit the project to being firmly within the free-software camp ("we believe that advancing software and content freedom is a central goal for the Fedora Project, and that we should accomplish that goal through the use of the software and content we promote") and to providing leading-edge software, including current kernels. Given that the kernel project, too, is focused on free software, it is interesting to see a call within the Fedora community to hold back on kernel updates in order to be able to support a proprietary driver.

    On September 5, Fedora kernel maintainer Laura Abbott announced that the just-released 4.13 kernel would be built for the (in-development) Fedora 27 release, and that it would eventually find its way into the Fedora 25 and 26 releases as well. That is all in line with how Fedora generally operates; new kernels are pushed out to all supported releases in relatively short order. Running current kernels by default is clearly a feature that many Fedora users find useful.

    More recently, though, James Hogarth noted that the NVIDIA proprietary driver did not work with the 4.13 kernel. This kind of breakage is not all that unusual. While the user-space ABI must be preserved, the kernel project defends its right to change internal interfaces at any time. Any problems that out-of-tree code experiences as a result of such changes is deemed to be part of the cost of staying out of the mainline. There is little sympathy for those who have to deal with such issues, and none at all if the out-of-tree code in question is proprietary. Community-oriented projects like Fedora usually take a similar attitude, refusing to slow down for the sake of proprietary code.

  • Notes from the LPC tracing microconference

    The "tracing and BPF" microconference was held on the final day of the 2017 Linux Plumbers Conference; it covered a number of topics relevant to heavy users of kernel and user-space tracing. Read on for a summary of a number of those discussions on topics like BPF introspection, stack traces, kprobes, uprobes, and the Common Trace Format.

    Unfortunately, your editor had to leave the session before it reached its end, so this article does not reflect all of the topics discussed there. For those who are interested, this Etherpad instance contains notes taken by participants at the session.

  • An update on live kernel patching

    In the refereed track at the 2017 Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC), Jiri Kosina gave an update on the status and plans for the live kernel patching feature. It is a feature that has a long history—pre-dating Linux itself—and has had a multi-year path into the kernel. Kosina reviewed that history, while also looking at some of the limitations and missing features for live patching.

    The first question that gets asked about patching a running kernel is "why?", he said. That question gets asked in the comments on LWN articles and elsewhere. The main driver of the feature is the high cost of downtime in data centers. That leads data center operators to plan outages many months in advance to reduce the cost; but in the case of a zero-day vulnerability, that time is not available. Live kernel patching is targeted at making small security fixes as a stopgap measure until the kernel can be updated during a less-hurried, planned outage. It is not meant for replacing the kernel bit by bit over time, but as an emergency measure when the kernel is vulnerable.

  • Safety-critical realtime with Linux

    Doing realtime processing with a general-purpose operating-system like Linux can be a challenge by itself, but safety-critical realtime processing ups the ante considerably. During a session at Open Source Summit North America, Wolfgang Mauerer discussed the difficulties involved in this kind of work and what Linux has to offer.

    Realtime processing, as many have said, is not synonymous with "real fast". It is, instead, focused on deterministic response time and repeatable results. Getting there involves quantifying the worst-case scenario and being prepared to handle it — a 99% success rate is not good enough. The emphasis on worst-case performance is at the core of the difference with performance-oriented processing, which uses caches, lookahead algorithms, pipelines, and more to optimize the average case.

  • A memory allocation API for graphics devices

    At last year's X.Org Developers Conference (XDC), James Jones began the process of coming up with an API for allocating memory so that it is accessible to multiple different graphics devices in a system (e.g. GPUs, hardware compositors, video decoders, display hardware, cameras, etc.). At XDC 2017 in Mountain View, CA, he was back to update attendees on the progress that has been made. He has a prototype in progress, but there is plenty more to do, including working out some of the problems he has encountered along the way.

    Jones has been at NVIDIA for 13 years and has been working on this problem in various forms for most of that time, he said. Allocating buffers and passing them around between multiple drivers is a complicated problem. The allocator will sit in the same place as the Generic Buffer Management (GBM) component is today; it will be used both by applications and by various user-space driver components. The allocator will support both vendor-agnostic (e.g. Android ION) and vendor-specific back-ends, as well as combinations of the two.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Search for a way to get home in 'Estranged: Act II' now on Linux
    Continuing on from the first part, Estranged: Act II [Steam, Official Site] is now available on Linux. The developer switched from Source to Unreal Engine for the second part as well.
  • Strategy game 'Mushroom Wars 2' arrives on Linux
  • Meson-ized Mesa Now Supports More Drivers
    At the end of September initial Meson support landed in Mesa while hitting 17.3-devel Git now is support for more of the Mesa drivers under this new build system. As of Monday in Mesa Git, the Meson build system now supports building LLVMpipe, Softpipe, Nouveau, RadeonSI, Gallium3D winsys, Gallium3D state trackers and other components, and a variety of other changes. In other words, it's now much more practical using Meson in Mesa now that it's beginning to support almost all of the Mesa3D drivers/components.
  • Private Internet Access becomes a KDE Patron
    "We are very happy to have the Private Internet Access/London Trust Media as a KDE Patron and KDE e.V. Advisory Board member. The values of Internet openness are deeply rooted in both organisations, as well as those of privacy and security. Working together will allow us to build better systems and a better Internet for everyone", said Aleix Pol Gonzalez, Vice-President of the KDE e.V. "Private Internet Access is highly committed to giving back to those communities that have helped the brand and its parent company get to where it is today, and we are very much aware that vast proportions of the infrastructure we use on a daily basis, in the office and at home, is powered by Free and Open Source Software. We have made a pledge to show our gratitude by supporting FOSS projects to help encourage development and growth. We are proud to be supporting KDE and the crucial work that the project does for the Linux Desktop" said Christel Dahlskjear, Director of Sponsorships and Events at Private Internet Access.
  • Indian enterprise suffers from the innovator's dilemma: Benjamin Henshall, Red Hat
    "Open source projects are like children; no two projects are exactly the same, with different communities, structures, governance and contributors," says Benjamin Henshall, Director, AppDev Solutions, APAC at Red Hat. According to Henshall, open source, which is now the preferred model for consuming software will build the next generation IT systems. Speaking with Computerworld India, Henshall talks about how open source is the foundation for successful IoT deployment and how Red Hat is still the leader in this space.
  • What I have found interesting in Fedora during the week 41 of 2017

Debian and Ubuntu Leftovers

  • MiniDebConf Prishtina 2017
    On 7th of October in Prishtina, Kosova’s capital, was hosted the first mini deb conference. The MiniDebConf Prishtina was an event open to everyone, regardless of their level of knowledge about Debian or other free and open source projects. At MiniDebConf Prishtina there were organized a range of topics incidental to Debian and free software, including any free software project, Outreachy internship, privacy, security, digital rights and diversity in IT.
  • No more no surprises
    Debian has generally always had, as a rule, “sane defaults” and “no surprises”. This was completely shattered for me when Vim decided to hijack the mouse from my terminal and break all copy/paste functionality. This has occured since the release of Debian 9.
  • Debian Security Advisory 3999-1
    Debian Linux Security Advisory 3999-1 - Mathy Vanhoef of the imec-DistriNet research group of KU Leuven discovered multiple vulnerabilities in the WPA protocol, used for authentication in wireless networks. Those vulnerabilities applies to both the access point (implemented in hostapd) and the station (implemented in wpa_supplicant).
  • LXD Weekly Status #19
    This past week, part of the team was back in New York for more planning meetings, getting the details of the next 6 months, including LXC, LXD and LXCFS 3.0 fleshed out.

Software and howtos

  • wikipedia2text – A Command Line Tool For Querying The Wikipedia Article
    Hi folks am back with another interesting topic called wikipedia2text. It’s a small Shell script to query the Wikipedia articles in console, also it can open the article in any browser. This shell script uses text-browser to query and render Wikipedia articles. The output will be printed to standard out. It Currently supports around 30 Wikipedia languages. Most of us prefer Wikipedia to know the detailed information about any company or any product information & it’s history. For any google search by default Wikipedia link comes in Top 5.
  • Yay! I Found Yet Another Reliable AUR Helper
    Howdy Arch Users! I’ve got a good news for you. Today, I stumbled upon yet another reliable AUR helper called “Yay”. Yep! the name of this AUR helper is Yay. Currently, I use Pacaur for installing AUR packages. It does great job and I really like it. I also have used other AUR helpers such as Packer and Yaourt in the past. After reading its features, I thought to give “Yay” a try and see how things works. So, here we go!
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  • mount.nfs: requested NFS version or transport protocol is not supported
  • How to Deploy Clojure Web Application on Debian 9
  • Copr stack dockerized!
  • Using Dell Dock With Ubuntu
    Over the years I have found my way around many minor hurdles when using Ubuntu, the most recent being Using the DELL ULTRAHD 4K USB 3.0 DOCKING STATION (D3100).

GNU/Linux Desktops/Laptops and Devices