Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Red Hat

Red Hat Woes and Fedora 29 Plans

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Shares of open-source giant Red Hat pounded on weaker outlook
  • Fedora 29 Aims To Offer Up Modules For Everyone

    The latest Fedora 29 feature proposal is about offering "modules for everyone" across all Fedora editions.

    The "modules for everyone" proposal would make it where all Fedora installations have modular repositories enabled by default. Up to now the modular functionality was just enabled by default in Fedora Server 28.

    The modular functionality allows Fedora users to choose alternate versions of popular software, such as different versions of Node.js and other server software components where you might want to stick to a particular version.

Red Hat and Fedora News

Filed under
Red Hat

Red Hat Process Automation 7 Goes Cloud-Native

Filed under
Red Hat

Business process management (BPM) technology helps organizations with operations management issues and processes. Among the vendors that develop and support BPM technology is Red Hat, which released its Red Hat Process Automation Manager 7 update on June 19.

The new release extends the BPM platform to Red Hat's OpenShift Kubernetes container platform. It also adds new dynamic case management capabilities for different types of operational workflows. The core business process automation functionality in Process Automation Manager 7 is based on the open-source jBPM project.

Read more

Red Hat: Decision Manager 7, UNICEF, Certifications and Buybacks

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Low-Code Tools Can Bolster Application Buildouts

    At Northwell Health a new style of app development is being pursued, one that invites clinicians and caregivers to be involved from the start.

    Healthcare professionals are usually not involved in an application’s development process, leaving it to the IT department. This can sometimes lead to delays, as the IT department may be inundated with requests, and organizations may see a disparity between original concept and end result.

    At Northwell Health, a healthcare organization based in New York, a new style of app development is being pursued, one that invites clinicians and caregivers to be involved from the start.

  • Kids across the world likely don't know Red Hat, but it's working for them

    Red Hat is a big business, but it still finds time to experiment.

    Just in the past couple of years, for example, the Raleigh-based software company has joined forces with Boston Children's Hospital and UNICEF to lend a hand with data projects and perhaps learn a few things along the way.

    The Boston Children's project has seen Red Hat help a team from the hospital work with imaging data from MRIs through the Mass Open Cloud, a public data collection in Massachusetts developed by a consortium of university, industry and government group.

    To date, the project has worked only with images where all identification has been removed, but Red Hat is convinced that at some point it's "going to be critical for the future of computing" to find ways to help researchers work with private data, "safely and without compromising privacy," said Hugh Brock, the Red Hat engineering director who heads the company's research partnership with Boston University.

  • Red Hat Certified Cloud Architect – An OpenStack Perspective – Part One

    The Red Hat Certified Architect (RHCA) is the highest certification provided by Red Hat. To many, it can be looked at as a “holy grail” of sorts in open source software certifications. It’s not easy to get. In order to receive it, you not only need to already be a Red Hat Certified Engineer  (RHCE) for Red Hat Enterprise Linux (with the Red Hat Certified System Administrator, (RHCSA) as pre-requisite) but also pass additional exams from various technology categories.

  • U.S. STOCKS ON THE MOVE-BlackBerry, Red Hat, WillScot, Sigma Labs
  • Red Hat Sees Subscriptions Surge, Announces $1B Stock Repurchase Plan
  • Red Hat (RHT) PT Lowered to $160 at Barclays
  • Red Hat starts new USD 1 bln share buyback programme
  • Galloping greenback rocks Red Hat
  • Red Hat (RHT) PT Lowered to $177 at BMO Capital

Red Hat News and More on the Negative Results

Filed under
Red Hat

Red Hat News and Disappointing Quarter, Buybacks Initiated

Filed under
Red Hat

Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel Release

Filed under
Red Hat
Security
  • Announcing the general availability of the Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel Release 5

    The Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel Release 5 (UEK R5) is a heavily tested and optimized operating system kernel for Oracle Linux 7 Update 5 and later on 64-bit Intel (x86_64) and ARM (aarch64) architectures. It is based on the mainline Linux kernel version 4.14 LTS. This release also updates drivers and includes bug and security fixes.

  • Oracle's Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel R5 Now Officially Ready For x86_64 & AArch64

    Oracle has promoted its Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel Release 5 to general availability for x86_64 and ARM64 (AArch64) architectures.

    Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel Release is their downstream of the Linux kernel that they sprinkle with extra features for security, performance, and extra features. The Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel is paired with Oracle Linux, the company's downstream of Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

Red Hat: Kubernetes, 'Cloud', and GlusterFS 4.1.0 Release

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Kubernetes StatefulSet In Action

    Recently, I stumbled upon a StackOverflow question around StatefulSets which made me wonder how well understood they are at large. So I decided to put together a simple stateful app that can be used to experiment with a StatefulSet. In this blog post we will have a closer look at this app and see it in action.

    If you’re not familiar with StatefulSets, now is a good time for a refresher, consulting the official docs concerning their usage and guarantees they provide.

  • The road to cloud-native applications

    As many organizations do not have the luxury of completely rebuilding their technology foundation or immediately adopting new practices and mindsets, they can embrace gradual yet fundamental shifts in culture, processes, and technology to help support greater velocity and agility. With software increasingly key to how users engage with businesses and how businesses can innovate to stay competitive, organizations should adapt to the new demands of the Digital Economy, such as speeding up application development and delivery. The cloud-native approach describes a way of modernizing existing applications and building new applications based on cloud principles, using services and adopting processes optimized for the agility and automation of cloud computing.

  • GlusterFS 4.1 Released With Performance Monitoring Improvements

    GlusterFS. the network-attached storage file-system focused on cloud computing and more that is developed by Red Hat, is up to version 4.1 as its newest release.

  • Announcing GlusterFS release 4.1.0 (Long Term Maintenance)

    The Gluster community is pleased to announce the release of 4.1, our latest long term supported release.

  • Release notes for Gluster 4.1.0

    This is a major release that includes a range of features enhancing management, performance, monitoring, and providing newer functionality like thin arbiters, cloud archival, time consistency. It also contains several bug fixes.

Red Hat News and Upcoming Results

Filed under
Red Hat

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

KDE: Qt, Plasma, QML, Usability & Productivity

  • Qt 5.11.1 and Plasma 5.13.1 in ktown ‘testing’ repository
    A couple of days ago I recompiled ‘poppler’ and the packages in ‘ktown’ that depend on it, and uploaded them into the repository as promised in my previous post. I did that because Slackware-current updated its own poppler package and mine needs to be kept in sync to prevent breakage in other parts of your Slackware computer. I hear you wonder, what is the difference between the Slackware poppler package and this ‘ktown’ package? Simple: my ‘poppler’ package contains support for Qt5 (in addition to the QT4 support in the original package) and that is required by other packages in the ‘ktown’ repository.
  • Sixth week of coding phase, GSoC'18
    The Menus API enables the QML Plugin to add an action, separator or menu to the WebView context menu. This API is not similar to the WebExtensions Menus API but is rather Falkonish!
  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 24
    See all the names of people who worked hard to make the computing world a better place? That could be you next week! Getting involved isn’t all that tough, and there’s lots of support available.

Programming: Python Maths Tools and Java SE

  • Essential Free Python Maths Tools
    Python is a very popular general purpose programming language — with good reason. It’s object oriented, semantically structured, extremely versatile, and well supported. Scientists favour Python because it’s easy to use and learn, offers a good set of built-in features, and is highly extensible. Python’s readability makes it an excellent first programming language. The Python Standard Library (PSL) is the the standard library that’s distributed with Python. The library comes with, among other things, modules that carry out many mathematical operations. The math module is one of the core modules in PSL which performs mathematical operations. The module gives access to the underlying C library functions for floating point math.
  • Oracle's new Java SE subs: Code and support for $25/processor/month
    Oracle’s put a price on Java SE and support: $25 per processor per month, and $2.50 per user per month on the desktop, or less if you buy lots for a long time. Big Red’s called this a Java SE Subscription and pitched it as “a commonly used model, popular with Linux distributions”. The company also reckons the new deal is better than a perpetual licence, because they involve “an up-front cost plus additional annual support and maintenance fees.”

Linux 4.18 RC2 Released From China

  • Linux 4.18-rc2
    Another week, another -rc. I'm still traveling - now in China - but at least I'm doing this rc Sunday _evening_ local time rather than _morning_. And next rc I'll be back home and over rmy jetlag (knock wood) so everything should be back to the traditional schedule. Anyway, it's early in the rc series yet, but things look fairly normal. About a third of the patch is drivers (drm and s390 stand out, but here's networking and block updates too, and misc noise all over). We also had some of the core dma files move from drivers/base/dma-* (and lib/dma-*) to kernel/dma/*. We sometimes do code movement (and other "renaming" things) after the merge window simply because it tends to be less disruptive that way. Another 20% is under "tools" - mainly due to some selftest updates for rseq, but there's some turbostat and perf tooling work too. We also had some noticeable filesystem updates, particularly to cifs. I'm going to point those out, because some of them probably shouldn't have been in rc2. They were "fixes" not in the "regressions" sense, but in the "missing features" sense. So please, people, the "fixes" during the rc series really should be things that are _regressions_. If it used to work, and it no longer does, then fixing that is a good and proper fix. Or if something oopses or has a security implication, then the fix for that is a real fix. But if it's something that has never worked, even if it "fixes" some behavior, then it's new development, and that should come in during the merge window. Just because you think it's a "fix" doesn't mean that it really is one, at least in the "during the rc series" sense. Anyway, with that small rant out of the way, the rest is mostly arch updates (x86, powerpc, arm64, mips), and core networking. Go forth and test. Things look fairly sane, it's not really all that scary. Shortlog appended for people who want to scan through what changed. Linus
  • Linux 4.18-rc2 Released With A Normal Week's Worth Of Changes
    Due to traveling in China, Linus Torvalds has released the Linux 4.18-rc2 kernel a half-day ahead of schedule, but overall things are looking good for Linux 4.18.