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Red Hat

Introducing Red Hat Quay

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Red Hat

Embracing container orchestration has many implications for an enterprises’ technology stack. An image registry becomes a critical component of the deployment pipeline. Red Hat Quay is a mature enterprise-centric container image registry which has a rich history of meeting the needs of cloud native technologists.

When Red Hat acquired CoreOS earlier this year, we were looking to amplify our leadership in enterprise container-based solutions. CoreOS at the time had two primary products, Tectonic and Quay. Quay was added directly into Red Hat’s portfolio of products and renamed Red Hat Quay.

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Also: FPgM report: 2018–38

Red Hat: Kevin M. Murai, Microsoft Puff Pieces, Red Hat CEO Optimistic About OpenShift 4.0 as RHEL Lags

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Red Hat

Fedora: Fedora 29 Beta Soon, Fedora Is Looking For Help Testing Their New Silverblue, Fedora at Software Freedom Day

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  • Fedora 29 Beta Will Be Released Next Week

    After slipping last week, the highly anticipated Fedora 29 beta release will set sail next week.

    At Thursday's meeting on the state of the Fedora 29 beta bugs, it was decided that the beta is ready to ship. After five release candidates of the beta, the blocker bugs around installation problems, some GNOME bugs, and other blockers have been resolved.

  • Fedora Is Looking For Help Testing Their New Silverblue

    Fedora is hosting a test day today for testing their new Silverblue spin, formerly known as Fedora Atomic Workstation.

    With the Fedora 29 release due out in about one month it will be their first under the new Silverblue branding. Fedora Silverblue should be pretty much usable today, but by Fedora 30 next spring they are aiming for it to be in great shape.

    Silverblue sets up Fedora to excel at container-based computing, rely upon Flatpaks for desktop applications, support a variety of technologies and workflows via GNOME Software, and other modern approaches to OS development and software deployment.

  • Software Freedom Day – SFD

    Software Freedom Day (SFD) is a Technology Event held annually worldwide to promote and disseminate the benefits of Free Software, its Philosophy and related Technologies.

    On September 15th, I was invited to give a talk about Fedora, this event that took place at the National University of San Luis Gonzaga, Ica.

Red Hat: News and Financial Results

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Q&A—Red Hat's Brian Gracely on open source and doubling down on Kubernetes

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Red Hat
OSS
Security

I think a couple of things. I think in general, in terms of filling technology holes and driving new innovation, open source has no problems and no lack of projects right now. In fact, probably the biggest thing we hear from a lot of companies is it's great that there's so much out there, how do we keep up with all of them?

Right now, I think there's a general sentiment from a lot of enterprise companies, telco companies and so-forth that most of innovation that's happening these days are in open source, moreso than it is coming from many vendors. So on one hand, that's a really good thing, a really positive thing.

The flip side of that is, because there's so much going on and there's so many things happening so fast. Open source has never been known for being the people that sit and finish up projects. They've always sort of gotten it to a good solid point that does 80% of what you want it to do, or it works well enough but there's not great interfaces and things on it.

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Red Hat's "DevOps" Hype Again and Analysis of last Night's Financial Results

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Red Hat: PodCTL, Security Embargos at Red Hat and Energy Sector

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Red Hat
  • [Podcast] PodCTL #50 – Listener Mailbag Questions

    As the community around PodCTL has grown (~8000 weekly listeners) we’ve constantly asked them to give us feedback on topics to discuss and areas where they want to learn. This week we discussed and answered a number of questions about big data and analytics, application deployments, routing security, and storage deployment models.

  • Security Embargos at Red Hat

    The software security industry uses the term Embargo to describe the period of time that a security flaw is known privately, prior to a deadline, after which time the details become known to the public. There are no concrete rules for handling embargoed security flaws, but Red Hat uses some industry standard guidelines on how we handle them.

    When an issue is under embargo, Red Hat cannot share information about that issue prior to it becoming public after an agreed upon deadline. It is likely that any software project will have to deal with an embargoed security flaw at some point, and this is often the case for Red Hat.

  • Transforming oil & gas: Exploration and production will reap the rewards

    Through advanced technologies based on open standards, Red Hat deliver solutions that can support oil and gas companies as they modernize their IT infrastructures and build a framework to meet market and technology challenges. Taking advantage of modern, open architectures can help oil and gas providers attract new customers and provide entry into markets where these kinds of services were technologically impossible a decade ago.

Fedora be pretty - The ultimate customization guide

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Red Hat

I am quite pleased with the final result of this transformation. But it also requires a lot of non-standard changes, which is a shame, because none of what I did, subjective taste elements aside, is super complicated. Imagine a Fedora, or for that any which distro, that has everything really nicely tailored for max. efficiency, ergonomics, productivity, and fun.

My journey encompasses the use of third-party repos, extra software, Gnome Tweak Tool, about a dozen extensions, new themes, icons, and fonts, the use of a dock, plus some extra visual polish. In the end, though, Fedora 28 looks and behaves the part. This is something I could happily show to other people, and I am convinced they would be inclined to try it. Well, there you go. The guide. Hopefully, you'll find it useful, and perhaps it may even hype up your enthusiasm for Linux. In these dreary times, an injection of fanboyese is quite needed. Take care.

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Red Hat Reports Results, Shares Collapse

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Red Hat: Boston, US Government, OpenShift Route, VirtualBox and More

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  • BU Spark! teams up with Red Hat, hosts software design workshop

    Students traveled across Boston to its Fort Point neighborhood to attend a BU Spark! workshop about interaction design Friday. There they delved into interaction design and explored how to develop user-friendly software.

    BU Spark! and Red Hat Inc. hosted the Interaction Design Bootcamp jointly at Red Hat’s Boston office. BU students and Spark! Interaction design fellows attended.

    Red Hat is a software company that specializes in information technology and has a research relationship with Boston University that includes educational elements. The programs taught by Red Hat focus on user experience design, one of Red Hat’s specializations, according to their website.

  • Open source can spark innovative business transformation in government, Red Hat leaders say

    The federal government, largely hamstrung by legacy systems, is in need of a major digital transformation. Open source technology can be the spark that sets off that revolution, leaders from open-source software company Red Hat said Tuesday.

    “The types of technologies that you choose matter,” said Mike Walker, global director of Open Innovation Labs at Red Hat. “It will influence the way your business operates and open new doors to new business process, and ultimately allow you to become a software company that can achieve some of those innovations and reductions in cost and time.”

  • Kubernetes Ingress vs OpenShift Route

    Although pods and services have their own IP addresses on Kubernetes, these IP addresses are only reachable within the Kubernetes cluster and not accessible to the outside clients. The Ingress object in Kubernetes, although still in beta, is designed to signal the Kubernetes platform that a certain service needs to be accessible to the outside world and it contains the configuration needed such as an externally-reachable URL, SSL, and more.

    Creating an ingress object should not have any effects on its own and requires an ingress controller on the Kubernetes platform in order to fulfill the configurations defined by the ingress object.

    Here at Red Hat, we saw the need for enabling external access to services before the introduction of ingress objects in Kubernetes, and created a concept called Route for the same purpose (with additional capabilities such as splitting traffic between multiple backends, sticky sessions, etc). Red Hat is one of the top contributors to the Kubernetes community and contributed the design principles behind Routes to the community which heavily influenced the Ingress design.

  • VirtualBox DRM/KMS Driver Proceeding With Atomic Mode-Setting Support

    The "vboxvideo" DRM/KMS driver for use by VirtualBox guest virtual machines that has been part of the mainline Linux kernel the past several cycles will soon see atomic mode-setting support.

    Hans de Goede of Red Hat, who has been stewarding this driver into the Linux kernel after Oracle has failed to do so, is tackling the atomic mode-setting as his latest advancement to this driver important for a VirtualBox desktop VM experience. Published today were initial patches preparing the move to atomic mode-setting but not yet the full migration to this modern display API that offers numerous benefits.

  • A Roadblock Ahead? – Red Hat, Inc. (RHT), Ingersoll-Rand Plc (IR)
  • Red Hat Shares Have Even Upside-Downside Profile, JPMorgan Says In Downgrade
  • Earnings Preview: Red Hat poised to deliver earnings growth for Q2
  • J.P. Morgan Securities Slams Red Hat Stock With Downgrade Before Earnings
  • Red Hat Inc. (RHT) Moves Lower on Volume Spike for September 18
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Android Leftovers

Elementary OS Juno Beta 2 Released

Elementary OS June beta 2 is now available to download. This second beta build of the Ubuntu-based Linux distribution touts a number of changes over the elementary OS june beta released back in July. Due to the shifting sands on which Juno is built the elementary team advise those planning on testing the release to do so by making a fresh install rather than doing an upgrade from beta 1 or (worse) an older version of elementary OS. Read more

today's howtos

Linux - The beginning of the end

You should never swear at people under you - I use the word under in the hierarchical sense. Colleagues? Well, probably not, although you should never hold back on your opinion. Those above you in the food chain? It's fair game. You risk it to biscuit it. I say, Linus shouldn't have used the language he did in about 55-65% of the cases. In those 55-65% of the cases, he swore at people when he should have focused on swearing at the technical solution. The thing is, people can make bad products but that does not make them bad people. It is important to distinguish this. People often forget this. And yes, sometimes, there is genuine malice. My experience shows that malice usually comes with a smile and lots of sloganeering. The typical corporate setup is an excellent breeding ground for the aspiring ladder climber. Speaking of Linus, it is also vital to remember that the choice of language does not always define people, especially when there are cultural differences - it's their actions. In the remainder of the cases where "bad" language was used (if we judge it based on the approved corporate lingo vocab), the exchange was completely impersonal - or personal from the start on all sides - in which case, it's a different game. The problem is, it's the whole package. You don't selective get to pick a person's attributes. Genius comes with its flaws. If Linus was an extroverted stage speaker who liked to gushy-mushy chitchat and phrase work problems in empty statements full of "inspiring" and "quotable" one-liners, he probably wouldn't be the developer that he is, and we wouldn't have Linux. So was he wrong in some of those cases? Yes. Should he have apologized? Yes, privately, because it's a private matter. Definitely not the way it was done. Not a corporate-approved kangaroo court. The outcome of this story is disturbing. A public, humiliating apology is just as bad. It's part of the wider corporate show, where you say how sorry you are on screen (the actual remorse is irrelevant). Linus might actually be sorry, and he might actually be seeking to improve his communication style - empathy won't be part of that equation, I guarantee that. But this case - and a few similar ones - set a precedence. People will realize, if someone like Linus gets snubbed for voicing his opinion - and that's what it is after all, an opinion, regardless of the choice of words and expletives - how will they be judged if they do something similar. But not just judged. Placed in the (social) media spotlight and asked to dance to a tune of fake humility in order to satisfy the public thirst for theatrics. You are not expected to just feel remorse. You need to do a whole stage grovel. And once the seed of doubt creeps in, people start normalizing. It's a paradox that it's the liberal, democratic societies that are putting so much strain on the freedom of communication and speech. People forget the harsh lessons of the past and the bloody struggles their nations went through to ensure people could freely express themselves. Now, we're seeing a partial reversal. But it's happening. The basket of "not allowed" words is getting bigger by the day. This affects how people talk, how they frame their issues, how they express themselves. This directly affects their work. There is less and less distinction between professional disagreement and personal slight. In fact, people deliberately blur the lines so they can present their business ineptitude as some sort of Dreyfuss witchhunt against their glorious selves. As an ordinary person slaving in an office so you can pay your bills and raise your mediocre children, you may actually not want to say something that may be construed as "offensive" even though it could be a legitimate complaint, related to your actual work. This leads to self-censored, mind-numbing normalization. People just swallow their pride, suppress their problems, focus on the paycheck, and just play the life-draining corporate game. Or they have an early stroke. Read more Also: Google Keeps Pushing ChromeOS and Android Closer Together