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Red Hat

Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Kubernetes on Metal with OpenShift

    My first concert was in the mid-80s, when AC/DC came to the Providence Civic Center in Rhode Island, and it was glorious. Music fans who grew up in the 80s will fondly remember the birth of MTV, the emergence of the King of Pop and the heyday of rock-n-roll’s heavy metal gone mainstream era, when long hair and guitar riffs both flowed freely. So recently when Def Leppard joined Journey at Fenway Park in Boston for their 2018 joint tour, I knew I had to be there.

    Metal also dominated the datacenter in the 80s and 90s, as mainframes and minicomputers made way for bare-metal servers running enterprise applications on UNIX and, soon after, open source Linux operating systems powered by Red Hat. Just like heavy metal eventually made way for the angst-filled grunge rock era of the 90s, so too did application provisioning on bare metal make way for the era of virtualization driven by VMWare – with subsequent VM sprawl and costly ELAs creating much angst to this day for many IT organizations.

  • Security Technologies: Stack Smashing Protection (StackGuard)

    In our previous blog, we saw how arbitrary code execution resulting from stack-buffer overflows can be partly mitigated by marking segments of memory as non-executable, a technology known as Execshield. However stack-buffer overflow exploits can still effectively overwrite the function return address, which leads to several interesting exploitation techniques like ret2libc, ret2gets, and ret2plt. With all of these methods, the function return address is overwritten and attacker controlled code is executed when the program control transfers to overwritten address on the stack.

  • Keeping both of your OpenShift Container Platforms Highly Available with Keepalived and HAproxy

    Until Kubernetes Federation hits the prime time, a number of solutions have sprung up as stop gaps to address geographically dispersing multiple cluster endpoints: stretch clusters and multiple clusters across multiple datacenters. The following article discusses how to configure Keepalived for maximum uptime of HAproxy with multiple cluster endpoints. In the following documentation an HAproxy and Keepalived configuration will be discussed in detail to load balance to the cluster(s) endpoints.

    In a production environment a Global server load balancing (GSLB) or Global Traffic Manager (GTM) would be used to give a differing IP address based on the originating location of the request. This would help to ensure traffic from Virginia or New York would get the closest location to the originating request.

  • How to integrate A-MQ 6.3 on Red Hat JBoss EAP 7
  • The Open Brand Project | The helpful guy in the red hat.

    A big part of the Red Hat Open Brand Project has been looking back at our past and examining our roots. It is important that we imbue the new symbol with as much shared meaning from our history and culture as possible. To represent ourselves, we have to understand our origins.

    Before there was Shadowman, before there was a red fedora, before we were an enterprise technology company, and before we helped make open source a driving force of technology innovation, we had our name.

  • October 19th Options Now Available For Red Hat (RHT)
  • Decentralize common Fedora apps with Cjdns

    Are you worried about a few huge corporations controlling the web? Don’t like censorship on centralized social media sites like facebook and twitter? You need to decentralize! The internet was designed to be decentralized. Many common activities, from social media to email to voice calls, don’t actually require a centralized service.

    The basic requirement for any peer to peer application is that the peers be able to reach each other. This is impossible today for most people using IP4 behind NAT (as with most household routers). The IP4 address space was exhausted over a decade ago. Most people are in “IP4 NAT Jail.”

    Your device is assigned a private IP, and translated to the public IP by the router. Without port forwarding to a specific private IP, incoming TCP connections or UDP sessions can’t tell where to forward to, and are dropped. As a result, nothing can connect to your device. You must connect to various public servers to do anything. IP4 NAT Jail forces centralization.

Release 1.0.0 of Flatpak

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Red Hat
Software
  • Release 1.0.0

    Flatpak 1.0 is the first version in a new stable release series. This
    new 1.x series is the successor to the 0.10.x series, which was first
    introduced in October 2017. 1.0 is the new standard Flatpak version,
    and distributions are recommended to update to it as soon as possible.

    The following release notes describe the major changes since
    0.10.0. For a complete overview of Flatpak, please see
    docs.flatpak.org.

  • Linux Application Sandboxing And Distribution Framework Flatpak Reaches Version 1.0 Stable

    Flatpak, the Linux application sandboxing and distribution framework, has reached version 1.0 stable. Compared to the previous stable series (0.10.x), the new version should have faster installation and updates, it allows marking applications as end-of-life, and it asks the user to confirm app permissions at install time, among other improvements.

    Flatpak is a software utility for software deployment, package management, and application virtualization for Linux. Applications built with Flatpak can run on almost any Linux distribution. Flatpak applications run in a sandbox environment in which the applications are isolated from the rest of the system, and require permission from the user to access the user's files or access hardware devices.

  • Flatpak Linux App Sandboxing Hits 1.0 Milestone After Three Years in Development

    The Flatpak Linux application sandboxing and distribution framework, formerly XDG-App, used for building and distributing conternized apps on Linux desktops, has hit today the 1.0 milestone.

    After being in development for more than three years, the widely-used Flatpak Linux application sandboxing and distribution framework has finally reached the 1.0 version, which means that it's mature enough to be deployed and used in production environments for distributing and running Linux apps.

    "Flatpak 1.0 is the first version in a new stable release series. This new 1.x series is the successor to the 0.10.x series, which was first introduced in October 2017. 1.0 is the new standard Flatpak version, and distributions are recommended to update to it as soon as possible," said developer Alexander Larsson.

  • Flatpak 1.0 Released For Delivering The Best Linux App Sandboxing

Red Hat and Fedora News

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Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Red Hat Advances Container Storage

    Red Hat has moved to make storage a standard element of a container platform with the release of version 3.1 of Red Hat OpenShift Container Storage (OCS), previously known as Red Hat Container Native Storage.

    Irshad Raihan, senior manager for product marketing for Red Hat Storage, says Red Hat decided to rebrand its container storage offering to better reflect its tight integration with the Red Hat OpenShift platform. In addition, the term “container native” continues to lose relevance given all the different flavors of container storage that now exist, adds Raihan.

    The latest version of the container storage software from Red Hat adds arbiter volume support to enable high availability with efficient storage utilization and better performance, enhanced storage monitoring and configuration via the Red Hat implementation of the Prometheus container monitoring framework, and block-backed persistent volumes (PVs) that can be applied to both general application workloads and Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform (OCP) infrastructure workloads. Support for PVs is especially critical because to in the case of Red Hat OCS organizations can deploy more than 1,000 PVs per cluster, which helps to reduce cluster sprawl within the IT environment, says Raihan.

  • Is Red Hat Inc’s (NYSE:RHT) ROE Of 20.72% Sustainable?
  • FPgM report: 2018-33

Lennart Jern: How Do You Fedora?

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Red Hat
Interviews

Lennart Jern is a Swedish-speaking Finn, who has been living in Umeå, Sweden, for about three years. He was born and raised in southern Finland where he obtained his master’s degree in applied mathematics. His time at university exposed Lennart’s true passion. “While at the university, I realized that computer science was really what I wanted to work with.” In order to follow his dream of working in computer science he moved to Sweden with his wife to pursue a master’s program in computer science. After a short while he had learned enough to land a job with a local startup. “I’m working with cloud/distributed systems, specifically with tools like kubernetes and OpenShift.”

Lennart’s first contact with Linux was in 2006. Some of the computers in his high school were running OpenSuse. He installed Ubuntu’s Hardy Heron in 2008 and has been using Linux ever since.

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Red Hat News/Leftovers

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Red Hat and Flock

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CentOS Linux 7.5 Operating System Is Now Available for IBM POWER9 Architecture

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Red Hat

Released back in May 2018, CentOS Linux 7.5 is based on the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.5 operating system and supported 32-bit (i386), 64-bit (x86_64), ARM64 (AArch64), PowerPC 64-bit Little Endian (PPC64el), PowerPC 64-bit (PPC64), and ARMhf architectures. However, the initial release only supported IBM POWER8 processors, but it's now available for IBM POWER9 processors too.

"I am pleased to announce the general availability of CentOS Linux 7 (1804) for POWER9 processors (ppc64le - powerpc 64-bit little endian). This release is derived from Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.5 ALT," said James O'Connor. "Note this release is 99% equivalent to the existing CentOS 7 Linux 7 (1804) for POWER8 processors (ppc64le - powerpc 64-bit little endian)."

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Ubuntu, Debian, RHEL, and CentOS Linux Now Patched Against "Foreshadow" Attacks

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Red Hat
Security
Debian
Ubuntu

Both Canonical and Red Hat emailed us with regards to the L1 Terminal Fault security vulnerability, which are documented as CVE-2018-3620 for operating systems and System Management Mode (SMM), CVE-2018-3646 for impacts to virtualization, as well as CVE-2018-3615 for Intel Software Guard Extensions (Intel SGX). They affect all Linux-based operating system and machines with Intel CPUs.

"It was discovered that memory present in the L1 data cache of an Intel CPU core may be exposed to a malicious process that is executing on the CPU core. This vulnerability is also known as L1 Terminal Fault (L1TF). A local attacker in a guest virtual machine could use this to expose sensitive information (memory from other guests or the host OS)," reads the Ubuntu security advisory.

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Red Hat News

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