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Fedora council elections canceled

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Red Hat

The Fedora Project's currently underway elections for the Fedora Council, FESCo, and the Mindshare committee have been canceled due to some glitches in making the interview material available. The project plans to get its act together and retry the elections in early January.

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Fedora 27 Gnome - Downhill and down

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Red Hat
Reviews

Fedora 27 is another in a long string of passionless, apathetic, badly stitched autumn releases that just make the Linux desktop look ever sadder and less relevant than ever before. Tons of hardware problems, crashes, bleak and useless UI, fonts and color problems, broken Samba. On the upside, media and smartphone support is good, performance is reasonable for an ancient box, and Nvidia drivers setup was elegant.

But remember, this is 2017. You need tons of extra, unofficial software just to make the desktop usable, there are so many inconsistencies it drives me mad, and if you just compare across the board, there's literally NOTHING in common with any which distro. For me, Fedora 24/25 was the highlight of this system, a brief glimmer of hope. If you feel the need, go ahead, but I'd say skip, wait, cry. Grade 2/10. On to the next tribulation.

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Red Hat News

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Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

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Fedora and Red Hat Leftovers

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  • Make Firefox Quantum look native in Fedora 27

    Client side decoration allows the application to use its own decorations. Traditionally the window manager is in charge of providing the title bar, close button, border, re-size grips, and so on. These graphical elements are called decorations. With client side decoration, an application can tell the window manager, “No thank you, I don’t want decorations.”

  • Red Hat Plans To Deploy Next-Gen Stratis Storage For Fedora 28

    Stratis is still at a pre-1.0 development stage and isn't expected to be feature complete at least well into 2018, but the hope is getting it early in Fedora will help mature it faster and see its community interest and adoption.

    More details on the Stratis Storage proposal for Fedora 28 can be found on the Fedora Wiki. More details on the Stratis project itself can be found via GitHub.

  • It’s time to modernize: Your UNIX alternative with Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Microsoft Azure

    A large Red Hat customer transitioned from a high-end RISC server to Red Hat Enterprise Linux on x86 and was able to recoup the cost of the project in just over three months. This is without factoring in real estate, depreciation of hardware, and power/cooling. In parallel, they were able to decrease their risk profile: according to one of Red Hat’s chief technologists who has advised many customers on their Linux migration strategy, spares for some RISC vendors have become increasingly difficult to acquire. Some customers readily admit that online auctions have become their primary source for spares. This is troubling on many levels. Factor in the price/performance ratio of RISC vs. x86 and the choice to migrate can become even more appealing.

  • Recent Institutional Activity: New York REIT, Inc. (NYRT), Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • Project Future Performance Before Investment – Red Hat, Inc., (NYSE: RHT)

Red Hat News Leftovers

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Red Hat and Fedora News

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Red Hat and Fedora Picks

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Fedora and Red Hat Financial News

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Latest KDE and Kubuntu

  • KDE Frameworks 5.41.0 Released with More Than 120 Improvements and Bugfixes
    The KDE Project released today a new version of its open-source KDE Frameworks software stack, a collection of over 70 add-on libraries to the Qt application framework, for GNU/Linux distributions. Each month, KDE releases a new KDE Frameworks build, and version 5.41.0 is now available for December 2017, bringing a month's worth of improvements, bug and security fixes, as well as updated translations.
  • KDE Frameworks 5.41 Released Ahead Of KDE Applications 17.12
    KDE Frameworks 5.41 is now available as the latest monthly update to this collection of add-on libraries complementing Qt5. KDE Frameworks 5.41 has a number of fixes including some crash fixes, updated translations, improvements to Kirigami, support for the idle inhibit manager protocol in KWayland, many Plasma Framework changes, and other updates.
  • Release of KDE Frameworks 5.41.0
    December 10, 2017. KDE today announces the release of KDE Frameworks 5.41.0. KDE Frameworks are 70 addon libraries to Qt which provide a wide variety of commonly needed functionality in mature, peer reviewed and well tested libraries with friendly licensing terms. For an introduction see the Frameworks 5.0 release announcement.
  • [Kubuntu] Testing a switch to default Breeze-Dark Plasma theme in Bionic daily isos and default settings
    Today’s daily ISO for Bionic Beaver 18.04 sees an experimental switch to the Breeze-Dark Plasma theme by default. Users running 18.04 development version who have not deliberately opted to use Breeze/Breeze-Light in their systemsettings will also see the change after upgrading packages. Users can easily revert back to the Breeze/Breeze-Light Plasma themes by changing this in systemsettings.

Games: Kim, ASTROKILL, Hearthlands and More

The Best Linux Laptop: A Buyer’s Guide with Picks from an RHCE

If you don’t posses the right knowledge & the experience, then finding the best Linux laptop can be a daunting task. And thus you can easily end-up with something that looks great, features great performance, but struggles to cope with ‘Linux’, shame! So, as a RedHat Certified Engineer, the author & the webmaster of this blog, and as a ‘Linux’ user with 14+ years of experience, I used all my knowledge to recommend to you a couple of laptops that I personally guarantee will let you run ‘Linux’ with ease. After 20+ hours of research (carefully looking through the hardware details & reading user feedback) I chose Dell XP S9360-3591-SLV, at the top of the line. If you want a laptop that’s equipped with modern features & excellent performance that ‘just works’ with Linux, then this is your best pick. It’s well built (aluminium chassis), lightweight (2.7 lb), features powerful hardware, long battery life, includes an excellent 13.3 inch Gorilla Glass touchscreen with 3200×1800 QHD resolution which should give you excellently sharp images without making anything too small & difficult to read, a good & roomy track-pad (earlier versions had a few issues with it, but now they seem to be gone) with rubber-like palm rest area and a good keyboard (the key travel is not deep, but it’s a very think laptop so…) with Backlit, two USB 3.0 ports. Most importantly, two of the most common elements of a laptop that can give ‘Linux’ user a headache, the wireless adapter & the GPU (yes the Intel HD Graphics 620 can play 4K videos at 60fps), they are both super compatible with ‘Linux’ on this Dell. Read more