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Fedora News (Flatpak 0.6.11, Rust, RISC-V)

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Red Hat
  • Flatpak 0.6.11 Linux Universal Binary Format Released with New Features, Fixes

    Alex Larsson from the Flatpak project, the universal binary format that aims to simplify application distribution across multiple GNU/Linux operating systems, announced the release of Flatpak 0.6.11.

    Flatpak 0.6.11 is a small maintenance version that comes approximately one week after the release of the previous one, Flatpak 0.6.10, bringing a new FLATPAK_CHECK_VERSION macro in the libflatpak library to automatically check the installed Flatpak version, a new option to the flatpak-builder command, namely "--show-deps," to allow listing of all the files on which the manifest depends.

    The list of changes continues with support for using dashes in application IDs, but app developers are being informed by Alex Larsson that to make them work with symbolic icon names, the IDs may not end with the "-symbolic" name attached. Also, it looks like PTYs are now correctly handled by the HostCommand component, which now outputs the correct PID instead of a bogus one.

  • Rust meets Fedora

    Rust is a system programming language which runs blazingly fast, and prevents almost all crashes, segfaults, and data races. You might wonder exactly why yet another programming language is useful, since there are already so many of them. This article aims to explain why.

  • Fedora / RISC-V stage4 autobuilder is up and running

Red Hat and Fedora

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Red Hat
  • Red Hat Inc. (RHT) Shares Sold by Strs Ohio
  • Smith Asset Management Group LP Has $70,571,000 Stake in Red Hat Inc. (RHT)
  • Fedora Media Writer Test Day – 2016-09-20

    The idea is the new tool will be sufficiently capable, reliable, and cross-platform to be the primary download for Fedora Workstation 25. The main ‘flow’ of the Workstation download page will run through the tool instead of giving you a download link to the ISO file and various instructions for using it in different ways. This would be a pretty big change, and of course, it would be a bad idea to do it if the tool isn’t ready.

    So this is an important Test Day! We’ll be testing the new version (Fedora, Windows, and macOS) of the tool to see whether it’s working well enough and catch any remaining issues. It’s also pretty easy to join in. All you’ll need is a USB stick you don’t mind overwriting and a system (or ideally more than one!) you can test booting the stick on (but you don’t need to make any permanent changes to it).

Red Hat News

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Red Hat
  • International Business Machines Corp. & Red Hat Inc Expand Collaboration on Enhancing Hybrid Cloud

    Both hardware and software businesses are poised on making the lives of their consumers easier through further extension of their partnership to provide better solutions

  • Red Hat Prepares for OpenStack Newton Improvements

    The next major milestone release of OpenStack, dubbed "Newton," is currently scheduled to debut the week of October 3. While the release is not yet finalized, product teams at Red Hat already have a grip on what they see as the big improvements that OpenStack Newton will bring.

  • Herzog dons a Red Hat in a private Cloud

    HTI chose to build its new PTC system on a “private Cloud” powered by Red Hat Enterprise Linux and managed by Red Hat Satellite and Red Hat CloudForms. The Enterprise Linux platform “allows for easier scaling for IoT (Internet of Things)-type network deployments and helps minimize the hosting footprint in Herzog’s datacenter, thanks to the flexible, stable foundation that it provides,” HTI said. Red Hat CloudForms, an “open hybrid Cloud management platform,” has helped Herzog transform its existing virtualized infrastructure into a private Cloud, through its on-demand scaling functionality. Red Hat Satellite helps Herzog maintain greater platform security and compliance with various regulatory standards, as well as manage its software lifecycle from testing through production. Herzog also worked with Red Hat Consulting to help bring its new offering to market.

  • How to partner with external marketing agencies

    A community-powered approach to working with the broad ecosystem of marketing agencies—to which more and more firms are turning these days—can produce new and inspiring results.

    I've seen it myself since I began leading marketing at Red Hat, especially during something we call our annual agency workshop. The workshop is our opportunity to strengthen the relationships, values, and shared knowledge that bind our community of marketing firms together.

  • What to Expect When Red Hat (RHT) Posts Q2 Results
  • Red Hat (RHT) Q2 Earnings: What's in the Cards this Time?
  • Red Hat Earnings On Tap: Margin Expansion Key

Fedora: The Latest

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Red Hat
  • AsciiBind all the things!

    I have finally finished a, probably way too long, proposal for implementing a new Fedora Docs publishing toolchain using AsciiBinder.

    The proposal, also published using AsciiBinder, suggests that we definitively adopt AsciiDoc and convert our DocBook sources to it without delay. Further we should begin publishing with AsciiBinder, ideally by Fedora 26.

  • What is the Fedora Code of Conduct?

    We all live in a society. Every society has customs, values, and mores. This is how homo sapiens are different from other species. Since our childhood, in school, then college, and then at work, we follow a shared set of social values. This shared set of values creates a peaceful world. In the open source world, we strive for values that lead to us all being welcoming, generous, and thoughtful. We may differ in opinions or sometimes disagree with each other, but we try to keep the conversation focused on the ideas under discussion, not the person in the discussion.

    Fedora is an excellent example of an open source society where contributors respect each other and have healthy discussions, whether they agree or disagree on all topics. This is a sign of a healthy community. Fedora is a big project with contributors and users from different parts of the world . This creates a diverse community of different skills, languages, ages, colors, cultural values, and more. Although it is rare in Fedora, sometimes miscommunication happens and this can result in situations where the discussion moves from the idea to the person.

  • Wheee, another addition.

    I’m thrilled to announce that Jeremy Cline has joined the Fedora Engineering team, effective today. Like our other recent immigrant, Randy Barlow, Jeremy was previously a member of Red Hat’s Pulp team.

Red Hat News

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Red Hat
  • Red Hat’s new installer lets you spin up a private cloud in just 4 hours

    Red Hat Inc. wants to help organizations deploy private clouds faster, and to that end has just unveiled a new tool called the QuickStart Cloud Installer (QCI) that should make it possible. The new installer comes just one week after the company rolled out Red Hat OpenStack Platform 9, based on the OpenStack Mitaka release.

    Red Hat’s new installer differs from previous installation tools the company has released in that it’s an all-in-one solution for installing various technologies from its product suite, including CloudForms, OpenShift and Red Hat Virtualization as well as OpenStack. Based on Red Hat’s Satellite system management technology, QCI allows users to create a fully functional private cloud environment in less than four hours, the company claims.

  • Understanding evdev

    evdev is a Linux-only generic protocol that the kernel uses to forward information and events about input devices to userspace. It's not just for mice and keyboards but any device that has any sort of axis, key or button, including things like webcams and remote controls. Each device is represented as a device node in the form of /dev/input/event0, with the trailing number increasing as you add more devices. The node numbers are re-used after you unplug a device, so don't hardcode the device node into a script. The device nodes are also only readable by root, thus you need to run any debugging tools as root too.

  • A Detailed Look At The Evdev Protocol
  • Chapeau 24 "Cancellara" Distribution Is Now in Beta, Based on Fedora 24 Linux OS

    Just a few days after informing the community about the plans for the upcoming Chapeau 24 "Cancellara" GNU/Linux distribution, developer Vince Pooley is now releasing the first Beta milestone into the wild.

    Yes, you're reading it right, a first Beta of Chapeau 24 "Cancellara" is now available for download so you can get an early taste of those awesome new features that we revealed for our readers in an initial report. And, as expected, the development release is based on the Fedora 24 operating system and ships with Linux 4.7 kernel.

Ayoub Elyasir: How Do You Fedora?

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Red Hat
Interviews

Ayoub Elyasir was born and raised in Tripoli, Libya. He currently works as a data engineer at Almadar. He says he’s passionate about “humanity, technology, open source, literature and poetry,” and enjoys swimming, body building and reading. Ayoub includes Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak as childhood heroes. His favorite food is grilled chicken and hummus.

Ayoub started using Linux years ago. In fact, he told us, “My migration to Linux dates back to 2008 with openSUSE 11.” Ayoub started to use Linux as a curiosity. However, today he uses Linux and open source products completely. He gradually shifted from KDE and openSUSE to Fedora with GNOME.

Read more

Igor Ljubuncic Explores CentOS

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Red Hat
  • The hunt for the perfect CentOS theme

    Here we are, at the end of this article. It serve no purpose really. But it shows that CentOS can be as relevant, stylish, slick, and modern as any other distro. Which is even more amazing when you take into account its age, its relative conservatism, the fact it will be supported for another bunch of years, and that it still competes well and true with all the latest and greatest home distros, with infinitely more stability.

    Just remember this is a server distribution, and its purpose in life is to run code and make money and whatnot. It's not there to entertain your laptop, and yet it can do that pretty well. Everything you need Linux wise is there. Including some fireworks. Maybe this article serves no higher goal, but perhaps you are ever so slightly delighted and entertained. If you have any suggestions on how CentOS can be made even more elegant, please drop me a nice and friendly line. Meanwhile, I'm off to do some more CentOS testing, maybe even on the G50 box. Stay tuned.

    Oh, one more thing. We have only just begun. If you think this is the sum of all pretty, then I have a few surprises up my sleeve - wizard's sleeve, Borat style. You will need to exercise patience for a few more days or weeks, and then I shall reveal unto you. But it will be good. I guarantee that. Now, for real, stay tuned.

  • How to tame and pimp Xfce on CentOS 7

    There you go. This is the ordeal that I had to undergo to finally have a fully working Xfce desktop in CentOS 7.2, loaded with all the right goodies, like software, codecs, and support for my gadgets, plus the necessary aesthetics. Most people take this kind of work for granted, and expect results from distro developers and distributions, which is perfectly legitimate. So if you find this unnecessary, I totally agree with you.

    Except, CentOS is a server distro, and it brings its special perks to the desktop, for the price of some extra work on your behalf. Moreover, you won't need to be repeating yourself, and you won't be plagued with regressions, so your effort won't be wasted. In the end, it comes down to ROI. For me, the technical bits culminate in some expected look & feel tweakology, a new menu, sound and audio changes, and a few other bits and pieces. Much simpler and shorter after you've done this once and know what to expect. Perhaps then, this little exercise won't be an ordeal for you, but a pleasurable little escapade and a long-term investment. I hope you enjoy it.

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