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Red Hat

Bringing new security features to Docker

Filed under
Red Hat
Server
Security

In the first of this series on Docker security, I wrote "containers do not contain." In this second article, I'll cover why and what we're doing about it.

Docker, Red Hat, and the open source community are working together to make Docker more secure. When I look at security containers, I am looking to protect the host from the processes within the container, and I'm also looking to protect containers from each other. With Docker we are using the layered security approach, which is "the practice of combining multiple mitigating security controls to protect resources and data."

Basically, we want to put in as many security barriers as possible to prevent a break out. If a privileged process can break out of one containment mechanism, we want to block them with the next. With Docker, we want to take advantage of as many security mechanisms of Linux as possible.

Luckily, with Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 7, we get a plethora of security features.

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Red Hat: Open source "more secure" than proprietary

Filed under
Red Hat
Security

Open source technologies are "more secure" than software that is developed in a proprietary way, Red Hat's JBoss middleware business unit general manager, Mike Piech, said in a meeting with journalists.

On the one hand, open source software code is freely available, which means that hackers will see how to hack it. But, on the other, there is also a vast community of people working to maintain open source software security.

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Open source not just software at Red Hat

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Red Hat

My internship at Red Hat has not only advanced my knowledge and skills of Linux but also about the concept of open source. When I first started experimenting with Linux, I downloaded a copy of a Debian ISO to share a partition on my Windows machine. While researching Linux, the phrase "open source" would often appear on blogs, articles, and on quick "how-to" YouTube tutorials. I would soon come to realize what that term really meant.

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Also: Red Hat Named As One of World’s Most Innovative Companies

And: Red Hat to Webcast Results for Second Quarter Fiscal Year 2015

[GNU IceCat] browser is (finally) on Fedora

Filed under
GNU
Red Hat

GNU Icecat will be available on Fedora updates-testing repositories for some days. That’s right time to test harshly this new web browser (really it’s not so new considering it’s a fork of Firefox) and leave a positive/negative karma or open a bug.

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boycott systemd

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat

systemd0 is a replacement for the sysvinit daemon used in GNU/Linux and Unix systems, originally authored by Lennart Poettering of Red Hat. It represents a monumental increase in complexity, an abhorrent and violent slap in the face to the Unix philosophy, and its inherent domineering and viral nature turns it into something akin to a "second kernel" that is spreading all across the Linux ecosystem.

This site aims to serve as a rundown and a wake-up call to take a stand against the widespread proliferation of systemd, to detail why it is harmful, and to persuade users to reject its use.

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Testing Fedora 21 fitness for world population with Internationalization

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Red Hat

Fedora is a global Linux distribution, as soon as we say the word “Global”, immediately internationalization (i18n) and localization(l10n) become a utmost important part of the distribution.

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Making Fedora work better [For me]

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Red Hat

I’ve been talking to my fellow Fedora user, James [who happens to be my boss] and he’s told me a few extensions that are available for gnome 3 that make things a little better, and to be honest I like them lots.

First of all you need to go here – https://extensions.gnome.org/ [use firefox]

The first couple I have install is

Applications Menu
No Topleft Hot Corner

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Did Red Hat’s CTO Walk – Or Was He Pushed?

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Red Hat

He went on to say that some within Red Hat speculate that tensions between Stevens and Paul Cormier, Red Hat’s president of products and technologies, might be responsible, although there doesn’t appear to have been any current argument between the two. Cormier will take over Stevens’ duties until a replacement is found.

Vaughan-Nichols also said that others at Red Hat had opined that Stevens might’ve left because he’d risen as high as he could within the company and with no new advancement opportunities open to him, he’d decided to move on. If this was the case, why did he leave so abruptly?

Stevens had been at Red Hat for nearly ten years. If he was leaving merely because “I’ve done all I can here and it’s time to seek my fortune elsewhere,” we’d expect him to work out some kind of notice and stay on the job long enough for Red Hat to find a suitable replacement. Turning in a resignation that’s effective immediately is not the ideal way to walk out the door for the last time. It smells of burning bridges.

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Reasons for Red Hat CTO departure still a mystery

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Red Hat

No one's saying why long-time Red Hat CTO Brian Stevens left the company, but it seems clear he left from his own desire for a bigger, better job elsewhere.

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More: Brian Stevens, Red Hat CTO, Steps Down Unexpectedly

Red Hat CTO Brian Stevens Resigns

DNF Makes It A Step Closer To Replacing Yum On Fedora

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Red Hat

DNF 0.6.1 was released today and this updated open-source package manager picked up a few more features as it's still in pursuit of replacing Yum on Fedora systems.

The DNF 0.6.1 release adds full support for the history redo command with integration for the repository-packages commands. DNF 0.6.1 also adds new configuration options pertaining to GPG keys/checking and there's many bug-fixes.

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RPM 4.12 Brings New Switches, New Rpm2Archive Utility

RPM 4.12 has been released as the latest version of the RPM Package Manager. This most recent upgrade brings a fair amount of additions, bug-fixes, API changes, binding improvements,a new plug-in system, and more. First up, RPM 4.12 brings a host of new command-line switches: --nopretrans, --noposttrans, --noplugins, --reinstall, --exportdb, --importdb, --recommends, --suggests, --supplements, and --enhances. RPM 4.12 also brings a rpm2archive utility for converting RPM payloads into tar archives. Read more

Qt Creator 3.2.1 released

We are happy to announce Qt Creator 3.2.1. This release contains a range of bugfixes, including fixes for: a freeze when using the current project or the all projects locator filters via keyboard shortcut a deployment error in the OS X packages which led to the Clang code model plugin not loading a crash when opening the context menu on C++ macro parameters For a full list of fixes, please see our change log. Read more

GNOME Control Center 3.14 RC1 Corrects Lots of Potential Crashes

GNOME Control Center, GNOME's main interface for the configuration of various aspects of your desktop, has been updated to version 3.14 RC1, along with a lot of the packages from the GNOME stack. Read more

Rust Developers Planning For The Rust 1.0 Language

Rust, the general purpose, safe, and concurrent programming language developed by Mozilla Research, is starting to assemble their vision of Rust 1.0. A new post on the Rust Programming Language Blog is laying out the path to Rust 1.0. The developers hope to move to Rust 1.0 soon with a beta coming out hopefully by the end of the year and the official release to follow. This Rust 1.0 milestone is to signify the Rust design "feeling right" and a promise to maintain backwards compatibility for future 1.x releases. Read more