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Red Hat

Fedora Wallpaper

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Red Hat

For some a computer wallpaper is not thought about and the default wallpaper stays for the live of their computer, others they like to pick a soothing scene of peace and serenity. At time I like The Serenity, but I usually like to rotate my wallpaper on a semi-monthly basis. While search the web for a new wallpaper I stumbled across a Legends of Zelda Logo wallpaper that I liked the look of. Not a fan of the Legend of Zelda I wanted to do something similar for Fedora.

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Day in the life of a Fedora Packager

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Red Hat

Ever wondered what it’s like being involved with the Fedora Project? There are many different roles and types of people that help make Fedora what it is. One common form of contributing is packaging. This is when someone takes software, “packages” it in the RPM format, and publishes the RPM to the Fedora repositories. There’s some steps along the way to being a packager. In this article, Fedora packager James Hogarth, responsible for ownCloud, Certbot (formerly LetsEncrypt), and more, details a day in the life of what it’s like being a Fedora Packager.

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Red Hat and Fedora

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Red Hat

BaruwaOS 6.8 Supports Let's Encrypt, It's Based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.8

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OS
Red Hat

The team of developers behind the Red Hat Enterprise Linux-based Baruwa Enterprise Edition commercial operating system, popularly known as BaruwaOS, announced the general availability of BaruwaOS 6.8.

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Red Hat releases Open Decision Framework

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Red Hat

Red Hat has announced the release of a community version of the Open Decision Framework, the company’s collection of its own best practices for making decisions and leading projects.

The framework, according to the vendor, can help decision-makers communicate transparently, seek out diverse perspectives, collaborate more effectively across distributed teams, and limit unanticipated impacts of business projects and decisions.

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Huawei Announces Collaboration with Red Hat to Offer Carrier-grade SDN Solutions

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Red Hat

The FINANCIAL -- Huawei announces completion of SDN Agile Controller certification with Red Hat OpenStack Platform 7 at Huawei’s Beijing SDN Open Lab. This marks the first time Huawei’s SDN controller has been certified for interoperability with a mainstream cloud platform. It is an important step for Huawei’s SDN Integration service in building a multi-vendor certification, construct open, cooperative SDN ecosystem.

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Fedora 24 to Ship with Linux Kernel 4.5.7, Will Be Rebased Later on Linux 4.6

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Red Hat

If you're reading the news lately, you should be aware of the fact that the Fedora 24 Linux operating system has been delayed a fourth time, and it now looks like it hits the streets on June 21, 2016.

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Red Hat and Fedora

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Red Hat
  • Setting up Vagrant for testing Ansible

    As part of my Google Summer of Code project proposal for the Fedora Project, I’ve spent a lot of time learning about the ins and outs of Ansible. Ansible is a handy task and configuration automation utility. In the Fedora Project, Ansible is used extensively in Fedora’s infrastructure. But if you’re first starting to learn Ansible, it might be tricky to test and play with it if you don’t have production or development servers you can use. This is where Vagrant comes in.

  • Some tools for working with Docker images

    For developing complex, real-world Docker images, there are a number of tools that can make life easier.

  • Stocks inside Investors Spotlight: ServiceSource International, Inc. (NASDAQ:SREV) , Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Blue-chip stocks of the day: Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) Rating Reiterated by Oppenheimer
  • Fedora 24 delay, and more openQA work

    You probably read a more sensationalized version of this on Phoronix already, but we had the Fedora 24 go/no-go meeting today and decided to slip for a week. The sole reason for this was this blocker bug, which is to do with booting Windows from the Fedora boot menu on a UEFI system, wasn’t fixed in time. If you don’t need to do that, you could frankly go ahead and grab a Fedora 24 nightly and use it. It’ll be fine. Go ahead, have a ball.

  • Contributing to Fedora Quality Assurance

    Every day, people from all over the world work together to create and support new releases of Fedora. One of the many important tasks is QA, or quality assurance. The QA sub-project in Fedora helps test software updates and new versions of Fedora. This includes testing in Rawhide, the “constantly changing” branch of Fedora development, as well as the alpha and beta releases.

  • Getting started with Fedora QA (Part 1)

    This article is a part of a series introducing what the Fedora Quality Assurance (QA) team is, what they do, and how you can get involved. If you’ve wanted to get involved with contributing to Fedora and testing is interesting to you, this series explains what it is and how you can get started.

  • Sources for Openly-Licensed Content
  • 32nd Chaos Communication Congress (32C3)

    At the end of last year Zacharias and Jacob joined me in representing Fedora at the 32nd Chaos Communication Congress in Hamurg, Germany. It was the first Fedora Event that I organized as Fedora Ambassador, therefore I was quite nervous. Until I arrived at the hotel it was unclear whether I will have any swag to decorate the assembly (there are no classic booths at the Congress), but I also packed some blue sweets, chocolate and Aachener Printen to lure visitors to our assembly. Luckily as you can see on the picture, additional swag also arrived in time.

  • python-bugzilla API changes in git

Red Hat News

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Red Hat
  • Container and Microservices Myths: The Red Hat Perspective

    What are containers and microservices? What are they not? These are questions that Lars Herrmann, general manager of Integrated Solutions Business Unit at Red Hat, answered recently for The VAR Guy in comments about popular container misconceptions and myths.

  • An open process for discovering your core values

    I'd read The Open Organization (and many other articles along the way) as I tried to navigate the path forward, discover my authentic leadership and management style within this (still very foreign) context, and lead change in a non-threatening manner. I'd adopted and promoted "All Hill" language and events to help break down siloes. We'd engaged in an All Hill "strategic visioning" process that was faculty/staff-centric, rather than being led by the board, and that resulted in some new relationships, dialogue, and common language. We had hired, retired, or exited many faculty and staff, resulting in an organization that was suddenly fairly evenly split—almost exactly one third newer personnel, one third in the three-to-ten-year range, and one third employees who had been at the school more than a decade (half for more than 20 years). And we were still very, very far from being an "open organization."

  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) Fundamental Star Rating Report
  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) Price Target and Share Rating Check
  • Ruling stocks in today’s market: Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
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University fuels NextCloud's improved monitoring

Encouraged by a potential customer - a large, German university - the German start-up company NextCloud has improved the resource monitoring capabilities of its eponymous cloud services solution, which it makes available as open source software. The improved monitoring should help users scale their implementation, decide how to balance work loads and alerting them to potential capacity issues. NextCloud’s monitoring capabilities can easily be combined with OpenNMS, an open source network monitoring and management solution. Read more

Linux Kernel Developers on 25 Years of Linux

One of the key accomplishments of Linux over the past 25 years has been the “professionalization” of open source. What started as a small passion project for creator Linus Torvalds in 1991, now runs most of modern society -- creating billions of dollars in economic value and bringing companies from diverse industries across the world to work on the technology together. Hundreds of companies employ thousands of developers to contribute code to the Linux kernel. It’s a common codebase that they have built diverse products and businesses on and that they therefore have a vested interest in maintaining and improving over the long term. The legacy of Linux, in other words, is a whole new way of doing business that’s based on collaboration, said Jim Zemlin, Executive Director of The Linux Foundation said this week in his keynote at LinuxCon in Toronto. Read more

Car manufacturers cooperate to build the car of the future

Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) is a project of the Linux Foundation dedicated to creating open source software solutions for the automobile industry. It also leverages the ten billion dollar investment in the Linux kernel. The work of the AGL project enables software developers to keep pace with the demands of customers and manufacturers in this rapidly changing space, while encouraging collaboration. Walt Miner is the community manager for Automotive Grade Linux, and he spoke at LinuxCon in Toronto recently on how Automotive Grade Linux is changing the way automotive manufacturers develop software. He worked for Motorola Automotive, Continental Automotive, and Montevista Automotive program, and saw lots of original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) like Ford, Honda, Jaguar Land Rover, Mazda, Mitsubishi, Nissan, Subaru and Toyota in action over the years. Read more

Torvalds at LinuxCon: The Highlights and the Lowlights

On Wednesday, when Linus Torvalds was interviewed as the opening keynote of the day at LinuxCon 2016, Linux was a day short of its 25th birthday. Interviewer Dirk Hohndel of VMware pointed out that in the famous announcement of the operating system posted by Torvalds 25 years earlier, he had said that the OS “wasn’t portable,” yet today it supports more hardware architectures than any other operating system. Torvalds also wrote, “it probably never will support anything other than AT-harddisks.” Read more