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Red Hat

HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.11 Supports openSUSE Leap 42.2 and Fedora 25

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Linux
Red Hat
SUSE

Today, November 28, 2016, the developers behind the HP Linux Imaging and Printing (HPLIP) software, an open source print, scan and fax driver solution for HP printers and scanners on Linux-based operating systems, announced the release of HPLIP 3.16.11.

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Red Hat and Fedora

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Red Hat

Jose Bonilla: How do you Fedora?

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Red Hat

Bonilla first got involved in the Fedora community when he was studying for the RHCSA (Red Hat Certified System Administrator) exam. He felt using Fedora was the best way to prepare for the exam. “One criteria I use when choosing any open sourced software is to examine the community.” Jose looks at the number of users, forums, blog posts, and issue resolution all as part of the community. The Fedora community exceeds all his expectations.

Jose would like to see more development of Cockpit. “I feel that web-based server administration tools are the future and perhaps the gateway for new interest in Linux administration.” Bonilla did not credit any single person for influencing his decision to contribute to Fedora. It was a “multitude of people and their stances,” he said. Bonilla commented that his “goal is to convince people, by example, that open source projects such as the Fedora Project are important and viable solutions to anyone’s computing needs.”

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Red Hat Developer Toolset 6 released

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Development
Red Hat

On the one hand, businesses want the most stable operating systems. That's why Red Hat has Red Hat Enterpise Linux (RHEL). On the other, developers want the newest and fastest development tools. That's why Red Hat also puts out the community Fedora Linux distribution. But what if you want both? Red Hat has you covered with Red Hat Developer Toolset 6.

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Red Hat and Fedora

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Red Hat

Red Hat and Fedora

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Red Hat

Red Hat and Fedora

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Red Hat

Fedora News

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Red Hat
  • FUDCon Phnom Penh 2016 – day 0

    After a long trip through Venice, Dubai and Saigon I finally arrived to Phnom Penh and the first thought I had was: wow, so hot and humid, that will be fun! At the exit of the airport a Tuk Tuk driver was waiting for me with a nice Fedora banner. He took my luggage and ten seconds later were in the middle of Phnom Penh’s rush hour. I think there is not really a word for it, you need to see the traffic with your eyes to understand that. Although I’m italian and I was several times to Naples and other cities of South Italy, it is nothing compared to Phnom Penh.

  • SQL Server in a Fedora Docker Container
  • Big multimedia repository update (CUDA enablements, rebases, new software)
  • Factory 2, Sprint 4 Report

    Work continues on Factory 2.0...

    Recall that we have 1000 different problems we're trying to solve, but we're attempting to focus on an isolated subset for now: problems we've picked so that their solutions can enable higher-level problem solving in the coming months.

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More in Tux Machines

Kernel Space/Linux

Red Hat News

openSUSE Tumbleweed: A Linux distribution on the leading edge

So, to summarize: openSUSE Tumbleweed is a good, solid, stable Linux distribution with a wide range of desktops available. It is not anything particularly exotic or unstable, and it does not require an unusual amount of Linux expertise to install and use on an everyday system. To make a very simple comparison, in my experience installing and using Tumbleweed is much less difficult and much less risky than using the Debian "testing" distribution, and it is kept much (much much) more up to date than openSUSE Leap, Debian "stable", Linux Mint or Ubuntu. I don't say that to demean any of those other distributions. As I said at the end of my recent post about point-release vs. rolling-release distributions, if your hardware is fully supported by one of those point-release distributions, and you are satisfied with the applications included in them, then they are certainly a good choice. But if you like staying on the leading edge, or if you have very new hardware which requires the latest Linux kernel and drivers, or you just want/need the latest version of some application (in my case this would be digiKam), then openSuSE could be just what you want. Read more Also: Google Summer of Code 2017

Graphics in Linux

  • 17 Fresh AMDGPU DC Patches Posted Today
    Seventeen more "DC" display code patches were published today for the AMDGPU DRM driver, but it's still not clear if it will be ready -- or accepted -- for Linux 4.12. AMD developers posted 17 new DC (formerly known as DAL) patches today to provide small fixes for Vega10/GFX9 hardware, various internal code changes, CP2520 DisplayPort compliance, and various small fixes.
  • libinput 1.7.0
  • Libinput 1.7 Released With Support For Lid Switches, Scroll Wheel Improvements
    Peter Hutterer has announced the new release of libinput 1.7.0 as the input handling library most commonly associated with Wayland systems but also with Ubuntu's Mir as well as the X.Org Server via the xf86-input-libinput driver.
  • Nouveau TGSI Shader Cache Enabled In Mesa 17.1 Git
    Building off the work laid by Timothy Arceri and others for enabling a TGSI (and hardware) shader cache in the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver as well as R600g TGSI shader cache due ot the common infrastructure work, the Nouveau driver is now leveraging it to enable the TGSI shader cache for Nouveau Gallium3D drivers.