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Red Hat

Red Hat and Fedora-based Qubes

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Red Hat

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.5 Beta now available

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Red Hat

The applications that run the modern enterprise rely upon, in some way, shape, or form, the operating system. Forming the linchpin of business IT, the operating system serves as the foundation for service and application innovation. Today, we’re pleased to announce the latest update to the world’s leading enterprise Linux platform with the beta availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.5.

Powering business applications with greater control, confidence, and freedom, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.5 Beta is designed to provide a consistent foundation across the hybrid cloud and offers key new and enhanced features around security and compliance, platform efficiency, and manageability. Additionally, the latest version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 continues to support alternative architectures, with variants available for IBM Power, IBM System z, and Arm deployments as well as x86.

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Also: Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.5 Reaches Public Beta

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.5 Offers Wayland In Tech Preview Form

Red Hat News

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Red Hat

Exploring Linux containers

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GNU
Linux
Red Hat
Server

They're not quite virtual systems, since they rely on the host OS to operate, nor are they simply applications. Dan Walsh from Red Hat has said that on Linux, "everything is a container," reminding me of the days when people claimed that everything on Unix was a file. But the vision has less to do with the guts of the OS and more to do with explaining how containers work and how they are different than virtual systems in some very interesting and important ways.

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Red Hat Hires From Microsoft; Fedora 27 Release Party at Taipei

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Red Hat and Fedora

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Red Hat
  • Red Hat Satellite: Patch Management Overview and Analysis

    We review Red Hat Satellite, a patch management solution for enterprise Linux systems.

  • Analysts Expect Red Hat Inc (RHT) Will Announce Quarterly Sales of $761.96 Million
  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) Shares Move -0.17%
  • A Modularity rethink for Fedora

    We have covered the Fedora Modularity initiative a time or two over the years but, just as the modular "product" started rolling out, Fedora went back to the drawing board. There were a number of fundamental problems with Modularity as it was to be delivered in the Fedora 27 server edition, so a classic version of the distribution was released instead. But Modularity is far from dead; there is a new plan afoot to deliver it for Fedora 28, which is due in May.

    The problem that Modularity seeks to solve is that different users of the distribution have differing needs for stability versus tracking the bleeding edge. The pain is most often felt in the fast-moving web development world, where frameworks and applications move far more quickly than Fedora as a whole can—even if it could, moving that quickly would be problematic for other types of users. So Modularity was meant to be a way for Fedora users to pick and choose which "modules" (a cohesive set of packages supporting a particular version of, say, Node.js, Django, a web server, or a database management system) are included in their tailored instance of Fedora. The Tumbleweed snapshots feature of the openSUSE rolling distribution is targeted at solving much the same problem.

    Modularity would also facilitate installing multiple different versions of modules so that different applications could each use the versions of the web framework, database, and web server that the application supports. It is, in some ways, an attempt to give users the best of both worlds: the stability of a Fedora release with the availability of modules of older and newer packages, some of which would be supported beyond the typical 13-month lifecycle of a Fedora release. The trick is in how to get there.

Red Hat Corporate News

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Red Hat

Red Hat Patch Warning

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Red Hat
Security
  • We Didn't Pull CPU Microcode Update to Pass the Buck
  • Red Hat Will Revert Spectre Patches After Receiving Reports of Boot Issues

    Red Hat is releasing updates that are reverting previous patches for the Spectre vulnerability (Variant 2, aka CVE-2017-5715) after customers complained that some systems were failing to boot.

    "Red Hat is no longer providing microcode to address Spectre, variant 2, due to instabilities introduced that are causing customer systems to not boot," the company said yesterday.

    "The latest microcode_ctl and linux-firmware packages are reverting these unstable microprocessor firmware changes to versions that were known to be stable and well tested, released prior to the Spectre/Meltdown embargo lift date on Jan 3rd," Red Had added.

Red Hat News

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Red Hat
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KaOS 2017.11 review - Chaotic and unfriendly

KaOS 2017.11 feels like a very buggy product. While I do like the Nvidia setup right from the start, this little gem is offset by pretty much everything else. Most other recent distros rarely had any issues with the LG RD510 laptop - apart from the ATA link reset on wake after suspend, which affects all of them - but KaOS is an exception to that rule with a rather depressing hardware record - Bluetooth, Wireless no-reconnect, smartphone support. And let's not even talk about Samba. The responsiveness was quite bad, Kaptan did not work, and I wasn't enjoying the visual side of things one bit. In fact, I really do not understand the eye-killing choices that go with the default theme. All in all, there are very few redeeming factors to KaOS. If you're looking for something avant-garde, the Arch-based Antergos or Manjaro fit the bill rather well. If you want mainstream, Mint or Ubuntu or whatever. This falls somewhere in between, with nothing amazing in return. 2/10. Perhaps next time. Read more