Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Red Hat

Fedora: The Latest

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Behind the new Fedora Developer Portal

    Are you looking for projects that could use your help? Fedora Developer Portal is a great project to start with, even if you’ve never contributed before. One of the easiest ways to contribute, but still valuable, is tell the authors what’s missing. More about contributing is under the “Call for your help” header below.

    The main purpose of the portal is to serve developers (surprise!). The Fedora Developer Portal team recently released a new version, and their goal is clear: to create the Fedora equivalent of a site like developer.ubuntu.com or developer.apple.com. In just a year, the portal has come a very long way. In this article we talk to Petr Hracek and Adam Samalik, Red Hat engineers who work on this site among other things.

  • Fedora and Flock on Telegram

    The Fedora community is growing on Telegram. The group chat which I originally created for Flock 2015 and which was later changed to become a general group chat for Fedora users has grown into the size of >300 people.

    We also started a Fedora News Channel as a sort of experiment because it’s increasingly difficult to use social networks such as Facebook for spreading the word for free and IM networks may be the new way to get information to users. The channel is currently followed by 294 users, but some messages get three times as many hits because they’re delivered to every subscribed user and they may be share them further. Compare it to Facebook where our messages reach 10% of subscribed users at average.

  • ‘Package XXX is not signed’ error during upgrade to Fedora 24
  • How to upgrade from fedora 23 to fedora 24

    Fedora Project, proudly announced the release of Fedora 24 version, Now it is available to Download and Install it on your machines. we can Download fedora 24 from their official site.

  • Notes on a couple of FreeIPA bugs: host group sudo rules and failure to start with recent pki-core on older, upgraded installs

    So I’ve had a couple of issues with my personal FreeIPA deployment in the last couple of months that I never managed to dig into properly because of work on Fedora 24. But now F24 is done, I had time to figure them out, finally.

  • Fedora 24 released on all architectures simultaneously!!

    So for the first time ever we’ve released Fedora 24 across both primary and alternate architectures pretty much simultaneously! That’s the three primary architectures, x86_64, ARMv7 and i686, plus the alternate architectures of aarch64, ppc64, ppc64le and s390x. This is the first time we’ve ever released SEVEN architectures on the same day!

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat

Fedora: The Latest

Filed under
Red Hat

Fedora 24 Workstation Review: All Work and Very Little Play

Filed under
Red Hat
Reviews

Fedora 24 brings with it a number of technical improvements, software upgrades, and under the hood. It’s clear that the Fedora developers have been working closely with upstream sources to tightly integrate advances in everything from the kernel to GNOME, Systemd, NetworkManager, and GCC6 which have all been forged into a powerful core. However, that’s about where it ends.

When it comes to a being a full fledged desktop distribution, Fedora 24 falls a bit short, and that’s mostly due to the Fedora project’s limited repositories.

Read more

Also: Fedora 24 Released With New Features, Download ISO Files Here

Review of Fedora 24

Filed under
Red Hat
Reviews

We run out of time to have a play around and do any kind of serious testing of the Boxes application. But we have been reading about it and understand it is a virtual machine package, designed to run sandboxed virtual machines. Yes, similar to Oracle VM VirtualBox. We intend to look more into the Boxes feature a little later down the track. So we will bring you more information on it soon.

Read more

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

Flatpak vs. snap wars

Filed under
Red Hat
Ubuntu
  • Linux’s RPM/deb split could be replaced by Flatpak vs. snap

    Ubuntu's "snap" applications recently went cross-platform, having been ported to other Linux distros including Debian, Arch, Fedora, and Gentoo. The goal is to simplify packaging of applications. Instead of building a deb package for Ubuntu and an RPM for Fedora, a developer could package the application as a snap and have it installed on just about any Linux distribution.

  • Canonical changes the game by announcing universal snap packages

    Every so often, I get to sit in on a phone call, video chat, or conversation that absolutely blows my mind. Tuesday, June 14 was one such occasion. I was invited to hear Mark Shuttleworth (founder of Canonical, which produces Ubuntu Linux) discuss a major announcement. Naturally, I assumed the announcement had something to do with Ubuntu Touch (maybe they'd found a major US carrier for the Ubuntu Phone). Little did I know the announcement would be so profoundly game changing.

Flatpak and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
  • What’s new in Fedora 24 Workstation

    Fedora 24 Workstation is the latest release of our free, leading-edge operating system. You can download it from the official website here. There are several new and noteworthy changes in Fedora Workstation.

  • New Documentation Site

    The Pulp team is happy to announce the availability of a new documentation site for Pulp and its plugins: https://docs.pulpproject.org/

  • Upgrading Fedora 23 Workstation to Fedora 24

    Fedora 24 just became available and is officially released. You’ll likely want to upgrade your system. If you’ve upgraded from past Fedora releases, you may be familiar with the dnf upgrade plugin. This method is the recommended and supported way to upgrade from Fedora 23 to Fedora 24. Using this plugin will make your upgrade to Fedora 24 simple and easy. Note also that shortly after the release of Fedora 24, you will also be able to update to Fedora 24 Workstation using the Software app.

  • Announcing Flatpak – Next Generation Linux Applications

    The Linux desktop has long been held back by platform fragmentation. This has been a burden on developers, and creates a high barrier to entry for third party application developers. Flatpak aims to change all that. From the very start its primary goal has been to allow the same application to run across a myriad of Linux distributions and operating systems. In doing so, it greatly increases the number of users that application developers can easily reach.

  • Flatpak brings standalone apps to Linux

    The development team behind Flatpak has just announced the general availability of the Flatpak desktop application framework. Flatpak (which was also known during development as xdg-app) provides the ability for an application — bundled as a Flatpak — to be installed and run easily and consistently on many different Linux distributions. Applications bundled as Flatpaks also have the ability to be sandboxed for security, isolating them from your operating system, and other applications. Check out the Flatpak website, and the press release for more information on the tech that makes up the Flatpak framework.

  • Announcing Flatpak
  • Fedora Workstation 24 is out and Flatpak is now officially launched!

    This is a very exciting day for me as two major projects I am deeply involved with are having a major launch. First of all Fedora Workstation 24 is out which crosses a few critical milestones for us. Maybe most visible is that this is the first time you can use the new graphical update mechanism in GNOME Software to take you from Fedora Workstation 23 to Fedora Workstation 24. This means that when you open GNOME Software it will show you an option to do a system upgrade to Fedora Workstation 24. We been testing and doing a lot of QA work around this feature so my expectation is that it will provide a smooth upgrade experience for you.

Fedora: The Latest Release and More

Filed under
Red Hat
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Canonical Releases Snapcraft 2.12 Snaps Creator with New Parts Ecosystem, More

Today, June 29, 2016, Canonical has had the great pleasure of announcing the release of the highly anticipated Snapcraft 2.12 Snappy creator tool for the Ubuntu Linux operating system. Read more

AMDGPU-PRO Driver 16.30 Officially Released with Support for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

Today, June 29, 2016, AMD released the final version of the AMDGPU-Pro 16.30 graphics driver for GNU/Linux operating systems, bringing support for new technologies like the Vulkan API. Read more

Red Hat News

Peppermint 7 Released

Peppermint 7 launched a few days ago. Peppermint is a lightweight Ubuntu-based Linux distribution with an emphasis on speed and simplicity. Although the name is similar to Linux Mint, the projects aren't directly related. Peppermint originally was envisioned as a "spicier" alternative to Mint—whatever that means! Many distros come with a wide assortment of feature-rich applications, and that's great for power users who need those apps. But older machines can struggle to cope with those demanding distros. Peppermint solves the problem by offering a carefully curated suite of web apps that perform tasks traditionally handled by native apps. It's an approach that will be familiar to any Chromebook users reading this article. Read more