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Red Hat

CentOS 7.3 (1611) Linux Distro Officially Released for ARM64/AArch64 Machines

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Red Hat

CentOS developer Jim Perrin reports on January 4, 2017, the release and general availability of the CentOS Linux 7.3 (1611) operating system for AArch64/ARM64 machines.

CentOS Linux 7.3 (1611) is based on the freely distributed sources of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.3. Coming three weeks after Karanbir Singh's announcement of CentOS Linux 7.3 (1611) on x86_64 (64-bit) hardware, as well as Fabian Arrotin's release for the CentOS userland 7.3 (1611) on ARMhf platforms, the latest version of the server-oriented operating system can now be used on AArch64 (ARM64) machines, too.

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Red Hat needs to get real about the cloud

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Red Hat
Server

Serving enterprise datacenters won't sustain Red Hat. OpenShift and what it represents may be crucial to the company's long-term survival

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Red Hat and Fedora

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Red Hat

Jona Azizaj: How Do You Fedora?

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Red Hat
Interviews

Jona Azizaj is currently pursuing a bachelor degree in Business Informatics at the University of Tirana. She is also on the board of Open Labs Hackerspace. Open Labs Hackerspace promotes free/libre open source culture in Albania. She is also a co-organizer of Open Source Conference Albania (OSCAL). Azizaj is part of the Fedora Project and the first Fedora Ambassador in Albania.

The first time Azizaj heard about Linux was when she went to university. “At first I used Ubuntu because that’s what our teachers suggested, but after OSCAL I switched to Fedora just to see if it met my needs,” Azizaj says. “I was really satisfied with Fedora as an operating system and the community. That’s why I am still using it.” She has been using Linux for the last four years.

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Red Hat News

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Red Hat
  • Avoid echo chambers and make open decisions

    The Open Decision Framework (a model for applying open source principles to business decisions) is nuanced. On the one hand, it's a set of guidelines you can use to operate in a more open manner when you're making decisions that affect others. On the other hand, more holistically, it represents the essence of the culture described in Jim Whitehurst's The Open Organization. Usually, making open decisions isn't as easy as following a recipe. Every situation is unique, and given the pace of activity in a typical, busy work day, it takes a concerted effort to check your actions against a set of principles--even if you are well steeped in them.

  • Industry Spotlight: Red Hat Powers the API Economy

    APIs are the building blocks of today’s digital economy. Businesses are using them to fuel innovation between departments and to share company data and content with customers or partners at scale. They’re also using APIs to drive new revenue streams and to enable cross-enterprise agility. Although more organizations are building APIs with the goal of driving more value from their digital assets, many of those companies have trouble managing their APIs effectively, especially at scale. Red Hat brings order to API chaos so software teams can spend more time creating tangible business value.

    “You can’t just create an API and think you’re done with it,” said Sameer Parulkar, product marketing manager, Enterprise Middleware, at Red Hat, Inc. “You may create an API for a particular purpose today, but what about when requirements change tomorrow? How will you manage and secure that API? You need a scalable, enterprise-class way of doing all that.”

  • What Are the Numbers Saying About: Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • What are analysts Suggestions on: Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Today’s Top Gainers in the Market Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) from Technology

Red Hat and Fedora

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Red Hat

Red Hat and Fedora

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Red Hat

A Look at Fedora 25 and Fedora 26

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Red Hat
  • What’s missing in every installation of a Fedora 25 desktop?

    If you’re running any desktop flavor of Fedora 25, congratulations! You’re using one of the better-designed desktop Linux distributions.

    However, “better-designed” does not necessarily mean that everything is in place, for in the case of Fedora 25, it certainly is not. Most important components you expect to see on a modern desktop operating system, like a firewall application, are in place. But a few are not.

    Take, for example, that firewall I referenced above. It’s called FirewallD on Fedora, and the system gives you three means by which to interact with it: From the command line, from a graphical interface called firewall-config, and from an applet, aptly called firewall-applet The first two come pre-installed, but not the third.

  • Fedora 26 will have an LXQt Spin. Here’s what it looks like now

    LXQt is a one of many desktop environments available on the latest edition of Fedora 25. However, unlike the GNOME 3, KDE, Cinnamon, MATE and Xfce desktop environments, Fedora LXQt does not have it’s own installation image. In other words, it’s not a Fedora Spin.

    To install a Fedora 25 desktop running the LXQt desktop, you’ll need to install the system using a netinstall or DVD image and select the LXQT desktop package group and related packages from the package selection step.

    Because of an ongoing effort to produce a Fedora LXQt Spin, that process is set to change when Fedora 26 comes along next year.

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Latest Linux For All Release Is Based on Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS and Linux 4.9.5

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