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Battery Work for Fedora 28, Spec Change Statistics

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  • Improving Linux battery life, enabling PSR by default, testers wanted

    As you've probably read already I'm working on improving Linux laptop battery live, previously I've talked about enabling SATA link powermanagement by default. This is now enabled in rawhide / Fedora 28 since January 1st and so far no issues have been reported. This is really good news as this leads to significantly better idle power consumption (1 - 1.5W lower) on laptops with sata disks. Fedora 28 will also enable HDA codec autosuspend and autosuspend for USB Bluetooth controllers, for another (aprox) 0.8W gain.

  • Fedora 28 Will Hopefully Enable Intel PSR To Further Conserve Laptop Power

    Red Hat developer Hans de Goede has recently been on a mission to improve Linux battery life on Fedora. Now that SATA link power management is better handled and other tweaks, his latest target is on getting Intel's Panel Self Refresh (PSR) support enabled.

    Panel Self Refresh has been available for years but isn't enabled by default since for some hardware it can run into issues. PSR is part of the Embedded DisplayPort standard (eDP) for conserving power by being able to refresh the screen pixels directly when the screen's contents is not changing. PSR is supported by laptops/ultrabooks with eDP-based panels for the past several years, but again some quirky hardware can have issues with this functionality enabled.

  • Spec change statistics

    Over the last couple of days I took a look at all the spec files in Fedora. I wanted to find out how many packages have not been updated by someone else than release engineering for mass-rebuilds.

Red Hat News

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  • MYCOM OSI collaborates with Red Hat for telco cloud assurance

    MYCOM OSI, the leading independent provider of Assurance, Automation and Analytics solutions to the world’s largest communications service providers (CSPs), has announced a collaboration with Red Hat, the world's leading provider of open source solutions, to assure and manage telco clouds.

  • Red Hat explains its $250 million purchase of a hot Google-backed startup

    On Tuesday, Red Hat announced the $250 million purchase of CoreOS, a hot startup that competed in the market for "software containers," a trendy developer technology.

    Since its founding in 2013, CoreOS raised $48 million in venture capital — likely making this a solid exit for its high-profile bunch of Silicon Valley investors, including Kleiner Perkins, Intel Capital, Y Combinator, and GV (formerly Google Ventures).

  • Red Hat Buys CoreOS for $250M to Expand Its Kubernetes and Containers Leadership

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, announced that it would acquire CoreOS, Inc., a company known for providing the Container Linux operating system (formerly CoreOS Linux), Tectonic for Kubernetes, and Quay Enterprise container registry, for the price of $250 million USD.

    CoreOS joining Red Hat means automated operations are coming to all. In other words, both companies will work together to expand Kubernetes, the open-source system for automating scaling, deployment, and management of containerized applications in business environments, as well as to innovate in containers and distributed systems.

  • Hot Tickers: Fidelity National Information Services, Inc. (FIS), Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)

Red Hat News: More on CoreOS, Upcoming Results (March), Mycom OSI and More

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Red Hat is Buying CoreOS and More News

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Video Acceleration in Fedora 28 and the Rotting of MPEG Due to Software Patents

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  • Fedora 28 Planning For VA-API 1.0 Support

    The latest work by Fedora developers on feature work for Fedora 28 is shipping with VA-API 1.0 support for updated capabilities around the Video Acceleration API.

    The VA-API 1.0.0 API/ABI is provided by the libva 2.0 video acceleration library. Libva 2.0 was released last October with H.264 FEI support in its API, deprecating older parts of the API, fixing a race condition with the Wayland support, renaming some parts of the API, improving the logging capabilities, and various other changes. Libva 2.0 broke API/ABI compatibility with older versions of this Intel-developed Video Acceleration API.

  • A crisis, the causes and a solution [Ed: LWN says "this blog posting from Leonardo Chiariglione, the founder and chair of MPEG, on how (in his view) the group is being destroyed by free codecs and patent trolls."]

    Because there are rumours spreading about a presumed “MPEG-Video collapse” and Brownian motion-like initiatives trying to remedy – in some cases by the very people who have contributed to creating the “crisis”.


    In its 30 years of operation MPEG has created digital media standards that have enabled the birth and continue promoting the growth of digital media products, services and applications. Here are a few, out of close to 180 standards: MP3 for digital music (1992), MPEG-2 for digital television (1994), MPEG-4 Visual for video on internet (1998), MP4 file format for mobile handsets (2001), AVC for reduced bitrate video (2003), DASH for internet streaming (2013), MMT for IP broadcasting (2013) and more. In other words, MPEG standards have had and keep on having an impact on the lives of billions of people.


    In 2013 MPEG approved the HEVC standard which provides the same quality as AVC at half the bitrate. The licensing situation is depicted by the picture below (courtesy of Jonathan Samuelsson of Divideon): there are 3 patent pools, one of which has not published their licence and a significant number of patent holders that have not joined any pool (and not published their licences either).

     I saw the threat coming and one year ago I tried to bring the matter to the attention of the higher layers in ISO. My attempts were thwarted by a handful of NPEs.

    Alliance for Open Media (AOM) has occupied the void created by MPEG’s outdated video compression standard (AVC), absence of competitive Options 1 standards (IVC) and unusable modern standard (HEVC). AOM’s AV1 codec, due to be released soon, is claimed to perform better than HEVC and will be offered royalty free.


    The work of patent pools would be greatly simplified because they could define profiles with technologies that are “available” because they would know who owns which tools. Users could switch on tools once they become usable, e.g. because the relevant owner has joined a patent pool.

    These are just examples of how the MPEG standard development process can be adapted to better match the needs of entities developing licences and without becoming part – God forbid – of a licence definition process.


    Companies will slash their video compression technology investments, thousands of jobs will go and millions of USD of funding to universities will be cut. A successful “access technology at no cost” model will spread to other fields.

    So don’t expect that in the future you will see the progress in video compression technology that we have seen in the past 30 years.

Red Hat: Southeast Asia, Colin Garro's Departure and Financial News

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Red Hat News

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Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat and Fedora-based Qubes

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More in Tux Machines

SwagArch 18.02 - U Got Swag?

SwagArch sounds like an interesting concept. The aesthetic side of things is reasonable, although brown as a color and a dark theme make for a tricky choice. The fonts are pretty good overall. But the visual element is the least of the distro's problems. SwagArch 18.02 didn't deliver the basics, and that's what made Dedoimedo sad. Network support plus the clock issue, horrible package management and broken programs, those are things that must work perfectly. Without them, the system has no value. So you do get multimedia support and a few unique apps, however that cannot balance out all the woes and problems that I encountered. All in all, Swag needs a lot more work. Also, it will have a tough time competing with Manjaro and Antergos, which are already established and fairly robust Arch spins. Lastly, it needs to narrow down its focus. The overall integration of elements is pretty weak. Eclectic, jumbled, not really tested. 2/10 for now. Let's see how it evolves. Read more

How Open Source Approach is Impacting Science

Dive into the exciting world of Innovative Science to explore and find out about how the Linux-based Operating System and Open Source are playing a significant role in the major scientific breakthroughs that are taking place in our daily lives. Read more

Programming: Developer Survey, Code That Unmasks, Retaining Newcomers

  • Developers love trendy new languages but earn more with functional programming
    Developer Q&A site Stack Overflow performs an annual survey to find out more about the programmer community, and the latest set of results has just been published.
  • FYI: AI tools can unmask anonymous coders from their binary executables [Ed: Just a kind reminder that if you are e using Microsoft's tools compile source code, there will be surveillance and telemetry in your compiled code]
    Programmers can be potentially identified from the low-level machine-code instructions in their software executables by AI-powered tools. That's according to boffins from Princeton University, Shiftleft, Drexel University, Sophos, and Braunschweig University of Technology, who have described how stylometry can be applied to binary files. That's kinda bad news for people who wish to develop software, such as privacy-protecting apps, anonymously, as this technology can be used to potentially unmask them. It's also kinda good news for crimefighters trying to identify malware authors.
  • How to avoid humiliating newcomers: A guide for advanced developers
    Every year in New York City, a few thousand young men come to town, dress up like Santa Claus, and do a pub crawl. One year during this SantaCon event, I was walking on the sidewalk and minding my own business, when I saw an extraordinary scene. There was a man dressed up in a red hat and red jacket, and he was talking to a homeless man who was sitting in a wheelchair. The homeless man asked Santa Claus, "Can you spare some change?" Santa dug into his pocket and brought out a $5 bill. He hesitated, then gave it to the homeless man. The homeless man put the bill in his pocket. In an instant, something went wrong. Santa yelled at the homeless man, "I gave you $5. I wanted to give you one dollar, but five is the smallest I had, so you oughtta be grateful. This is your lucky day, man. You should at least say thank you!" [...] I still get angry at people on the internet. It happened to me recently, when someone posted a comment on a video I published about Python co-routines. It had taken me months of research and preparation to create this video, and then a newcomer commented, "I want to master python what should I do."

Software: 5 Online Backup Solutions, Lector, Roundcube

  • 5 Online Backup Solutions for Ubuntu Linux
    As the digital age progresses, the amount of data we produce each year is snowballing. There was a time when we could fit all of our personal digital data on a few floppy disks, but many of us now have hundreds of gigabytes, or even terabytes, of photos, videos, music, and documents that we need to backup and protect. Backing up our data locally is essential, but any good backup plan should also include off-site backups. “The Cloud” has promised us unlimited, cheap storage where we can save our ever-growing data. Online cloud backups should be a part of your overall backup plan, but it’s crucial that your data is secure, encrypted, and backed up automatically. Here are a few online backup tools that aim to make cloud backups easy for desktop Linux users.
  • This Qt eBook App for Linux is a Real Page Turner
    Lector a new open-source Qt-based ebook app for Linux desktops. It supports most common DRM-free ebook files, including EPUB, MOBI, and AZW, as well as comic book files in the CBZ or CBR format. In both visuals and in features Lector is something of a page-turner; a desktop ebook reader you can absolutely judge by its cover. So join me as I take a closer look at its features.
  • Roundcube fr_FEM locale 1.3.5
    Roundcube 1.3.5 was released today and with it, I've released version 1.3.5 of my fr_FEM (French gender-neutral) locale. This latest version is actually the first one that can be used with a production version of Roundcube: the first versions I released were based on the latest commit in the master branch at the time instead of an actual release. Not sure why I did that.