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Red Hat

Fedora on ODROID-HC1, Flatpak, and RISC-V

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Red Hat
  • Fedora on ODROID-HC1 mini NAS (ARMv7)

    Hardkernel is a Korean company that makes various embedded ARM based systems, which it calls ODROID.

    One of their products is the ODROID-HC1, a mini NAS designed to take a single 2.5″ SATA drive (HC stands for “Home Cloud”) which comes with 2GB RAM and a Gigabit Ethernet port. There is also a 3.5″ model called the HC2. Both of these are based on the ODROID-XU4, which itself is based on the previous iteration ODROID-XU3. All of these are based on the Samsung Exynos5422 SOC and should work with the following steps.

    The Exynos SOC needs proprietary first stage bootloaders which are embedded in the first 1.4MB or so at the beginning of the SD card in order to load U-Boot. As these binary blobs are not re-distributable, Fedora cannot support these devices out of the box, however all the other bits are available including the kernel, device tree and U-Boot. So, we just need to piece it all together and the result is a stock Fedora system!

  • A Beginners Guide To Flatpak

    A while, we have written about Ubuntu’s Snaps. Snaps are introduced by Canonical for Ubuntu operating system, and later it was adopted by other Linux distributions such as Arch, Gentoo, and Fedora etc. A snap is a single binary package bundled with all required libraries and dependencies, and you can install it on any Linux distribution, regardless of its version and architecture. Similar to Snaps, there is also another tool called Flatpak. As you may already know, packaging distributed applications for different Linux distributions are quite time consuming and difficult process. Each distributed application has different set of libraries and dependencies for various Linux distributions. But, Flatpak, the new framework for desktop applications that completely reduces this burden. Now, you can build a single Flatpak app and install it on various operating systems. How cool, isn’t it?

  • “RISCY BUSINESS” runs Fedora in a chroot on HiFive Unleashed

Fedora: Fedora Atomic Workstation and New Third-Party Repositories

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Red Hat

Flatpak inception

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Red Hat
GNOME

One interesting usecase of flatpak is as a compliment to the ideas of Fedora Atomic Workstation and similar projects. In other words, a read-only core image for the base operating system, and then using various types of containers and sandboxes for the applications on top of that.

One problem in such a setup is doing development, in that the basic core rarely contains development tools. This is helped a bit by flatpak using runtimes and SDKs, because the compiler used during the build is not from the host. However, flatpaks are typically build using flatpak-builder, which still has some dependencies on the host, such as git/bzr/svn and strip. These pull in a lot of packages that you don’t want on a minimal core OS image.

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Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Inside a Red Hat Open Innovation Labs Residency (Part 3)

    This article is the final in a series taking readers on a journey to peek inside life in a Red Hat Open Innovation Labs residency.

    This is the top-tier experience for any customer*, exposing them to open collaboration, open technologies, and fast agile application delivery methods.

  • BPM, mobile, IoT driving investment in field ops, Red Hat and Vanson Bourne

    To better understand how these technologies are being applied and the impact they are having in the enterprise, Red Hat commissioned research firm Vanson Bourne to survey 300 IT decision makers from organisations in the US, Europe and Asia that employ a significant field workforce. The survey examined investment trends, current and future adoption patterns, use cases and implementation challenges.

  • Executive interview: Werner Knoblich, Red Hat

    Red Hat is 25 years old. We speak to its European chief about how open source, containers and hybrid cloud computing represent the foundation for IT

  • Highlights from the OpenStack Rocky Project Teams Gathering (PTG) in Dublin

    Last month in Dublin, OpenStack engineers gathered from dozens of countries and companies to discuss the next release of OpenStack. This is always my favorite OpenStack event, because I get to do interviews with the various teams, to talk about what they did in the just-released version (Queens, in this case) and what they have planned for the next one (Rocky).

  • Form 10-K RED HAT INC For: Feb 28
  • The Raspberry Pi 3 B+ in Fedora

    So I’m sure none of you are surprised to hear that I’ve been asked a bunch about support for the Raspberry Pi 3 B+ in Fedora. Well the good news is that it’ll be supported in Fedora 28. Most of the bits were there for the official Fedora 28 beta, it just needed a minor work around, but nightly images since Beta have had all the bits integrated so the upcoming Fedora 28 GA release will support the Raspberry Pi 3 B+ to the same levels as the original 3 B on both ARMv7 and aarch64. The Fedora Raspberry Pi FAQ has now been updated with all the details of both the RPi3+ and Fedora 28.

  • Commitment to community: Fedora CommOps FAD 2018

    The Fedora Community Operations (CommOps) team held a team sprint, or Fedora Activity Day, from January 29-31, 2018. CommOps provides tools, resources, and utilities for different sub-projects of Fedora to improve effective communication. The FAD was an opportunity for us to further our mission by focusing on two primary goals and two secondary goals for 2018.

  • PHP version 5.6.36, 7.0.30, 7.1.17 and 7.2.5

Red Hat Leftovers

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Fedora 28 Coming Soon

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Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.10 Enters Beta with a Focus on Security and Stability

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In an attempt to continue to deliver upon Red Hat’s 10-year lifecycle support, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.10 entered beta stages of development today with a focus on improving the security and stability of the operating system, as well as to add support for the latest hardware and software components, and support the next generation of cloud-native apps.

"With a focus on stability and security features that maintain hardware, application, and management tooling compatibility, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.10 Beta is designed to support the next generation of cloud-native applications through an updated Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 base image," said Red Hat in today's announcement.

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Also: Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.10 Enters Beta

Red Hat: Red Hat Women’s Leadership Community Luncheon, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.10 Beta, Stratis and More

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Red Hat: Storage, Liferay and More

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Red Hat
  • Red Hat Gets Serious About Selling Open Source Storage

    If there is one consistent complaint about open source software over the past three decades that it has been on the rise, it is that it is too difficult to integrate various components to solve a particular problem because the software is not really enterprise grade stuff. Well, that is two complaints, and really, there are three because even if you can get the stuff integrated and running well, that doesn’t mean you can keep it in that state as you patch and update it. So now we are up to three complaints.

  • Red Hat Announces GA Of Storage One

    Today Red Hat Inc. announced the general availability of Red Hat Storage One. Storage One is Red Hat’s approach to web-scale enterprise storage with the best of both worlds: a hardware-optimized turnkey solution with the flexibility and scale of software-defined storage. Storage One is built on the rest of Red Hat’s storage portfolio.

    The huge increases in data volumes make options like software-defined storage (SDS) seem more and more attractive. However, adopting SDS can be complicated involving new skill sets and configurations to systems. Red Hat’s new Storage One is a plug-and-play SDS solution that the company states can meet the varying demands of modern workloads. Red Hat worked closely with its server hardware partners (Supermicro Computer being the first) to deliver a tightly packaged workload-optimized storage solution. The company goes on to state that Red Hat Storage One is not just SDS in name but offers an open, flexible, and modular solution that can easily be extended to meet the evolving needs of the modern enterprise.

  • Firelay partners with Red Hat to deliver Liferay DXP on OpenShift

    Firelay, a Liferay Certified Hosting Partner, has begun a collaboration with Red Hat, the world’s leading provider of open source solutions, in order to deliver the Liferay Digital Experience Platform (DXP) on Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform. The availability for Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform allows Firelay to support the full life cycle of Liferay DXP-projects that are based on container technology, both those using the cloud- as well as on-premises installations.

  • Our Book Has Been Released! Introducing Istio Service Mesh for Microservices
  • Now available: The ultimate DevOps hiring guide

    Hiring the right people and building a successful team is no easy task. There are many facets to consider when talking to candidates, from cultural fit and team dynamics to skills, knowledge, and problem-solving ability. The ultimate DevOps hiring guide will touch on all those areas and more. More importantly, the freely downloadable PDF will help you navigate the unique dynamics that encompass the DevOps movement.

  • Red Hat Summit 2018: Trends in cloud-native development
  • Buy or Sell? What Analysts Recommends: Red Hat, Inc. (RHT), Hertz Global Holdings, Inc. (HTZ)
  • Brokerages Set Red Hat Software (RHT) PT at $154.94
  • Why is Red Hat (RHT) Up 4.9% Since Last Earnings Report?
  • Flatpak's XDG-Desktop-Portal Adds Initial Support For Snaps

    Released yesterday was version 0.11 of the XDG Desktop Portal and with this release comes initial support for Snap packages.

    The XDG-Desktop-Portal package is the portal front-end service originally designed for Flatpak (originally XDG-Apps) and provide a number of the portals for sandboxed applications to access system information and services.

  • Fedora 27 Coloured Bash prompt

Fedora Workstation 28 Coming Soon

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Red Hat
  • Warming up for Fedora Workstation 28

    Been some time now since my last update on what is happening in Fedora Workstation and with current plans to release Fedora Workstation 28 in early May I thought this could be a good time to write something. As usual this is just a small subset of what the team has been doing and I always end up feeling a bit bad for not talking about the avalanche of general fixes and improvements the team adds to each release.

  • Fedora Workstation 28 Is Shaping Up To Be Another Terrific Update

    Fedora Workstation 28 is shaping up to be another compelling update for those that are fans of this bleeding-edge Red Hat sponsored Linux distribution. I've been running Fedora Workstation 28 snapshots on a few laptops and test machines here and am quite happy with how it's shaped up as another Fedora release that delivers not only the latest features, but doing so in a seemingly sane and stable manner: I haven't encountered any problems unlike some of the past notorious Fedora releases from years ago. Overall, I am quite excited for next month's Fedora 28 release and will be upgrading my main production system to it.

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Android Leftovers

Graphics: XWayland and Mesa

  • XWayland Gets Patches For Better EGLStreams Handling
    While the recently released X.Org Server 1.20 has initial support for XWayland with EGLStreams so X11 applications/games on Wayland can still benefit from hardware acceleration, in its current state it doesn't integrate too well with Wayland desktop compositors wishing to support it. That's changing with a new patch series.
  • Intel Mesa Driver Finally Supports Threaded OpenGL
    Based off the Gallium3D "mesa_glthread" work for threaded OpenGL that can provide a measurable win in some scenarios, the Intel i965 Mesa driver has implemented this support now too. Following the work squared away last year led in the RadeonSI driver, the Intel i965 OpenGL driver supports threaded OpenGL when the mesa_glthread=true environment variable is set.
  • Geometry & Tessellation Shaders For Mesa's OpenGL Compatibility Context
    With the recent Mesa 18.1 release there is OpenGL 3.1 support with the ARB_compatibility context for the key Gallium3D drivers, but Marek Olšák at AMD continues working on extending that functionality under the OpenGL compatibility context mode.
  • Mesa Begins Its Transition To Gitlab
    Following the news from earlier this month that FreeDesktop.org would move its infrastructure to Gitlab, the Mesa3D project has begun the process of adopting this Git-centered software.

Welcome to Ubuntu 18.04: Make yourself at GNOME. Cup of data-slurping dispute, anyone?

Comment Ubuntu 18.04, launched last month, included a new Welcome application that runs the first time you boot into your new install. The Welcome app does several things, including offering to opt you out of Canonical's new data collection tool. The tool also provides a quick overview of the new GNOME interface, and offers to set up Livepatch (for kernel patching without a reboot). In my review I called the opt-out a ham-fisted decision, but did note that if Canonical wanted to actually gather data, opt-out was probably the best choice. Read more

How CERN Is Using Linux and Open Source

CERN really needs no introduction. Among other things, the European Organization for Nuclear Research created the World Wide Web and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the world’s largest particle accelerator, which was used in discovery of the Higgs boson. Tim Bell, who is responsible for the organization’s IT Operating Systems and Infrastructure group, says the goal of his team is “to provide the compute facility for 13,000 physicists around the world to analyze those collisions, understand what the universe is made of and how it works.” Read more