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Red Hat

Yum's Successor, DNF 0.6, Brings Sought After Features

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Red Hat

Aleš Kozumplík announced the release of DNF 0.6 today with the version bump coming as a result of some user sought after functionality.

The main feature of DNF 0.6.0 is support for advisory listings via the updateinfo sub-command to DNF. This drop-in replacement to Yum also now supports the include configuration directive and there's improvements to group operations. A handful of bugs were also fixed by this latest release.

More details on DNF 0.6 can be found via this blog post and the release notes.

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Red Hat Releases Project Atomic

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Red Hat
Server

In April, Red Hat released Project Atomic, a prototype system for running Docker containers. This is Red Hat’s response to the interest in CoreOS a system for hosting Docker containers based on ChromeOS.

Project Atomic is not intended to be another operating system; Red Hat already has RHEL, Fedora and now CentOS, so a fourth OS would not make much sense. Instead it is currently a prototype using Fedora, with a CentOS version slated to come soon, not yet a production product.

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RHEL 6.6 beta available for testing

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Red Hat

Red Hat has announced the release of RHEL 6.6 beta which is intended for testers. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.6 Beta includes enhancements to both security and stability as well as:

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Video: Fedora mentioned on TNT's Major Crimes series

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Red Hat
Movies

I ran across this on Monday night. Anyone else watch Major Crimes?

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Bodhi 2 update management infrastructure to land after Fedora 21 release

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Red Hat

Once upon a time in Fedora Core 1 through Fedora Core 3, updates were handled via a manual process involving emails to release engineering. Starting with Fedora Core 4, a private internal updating system that was available only to Red Hat employees.

The modern world of Bodhi began in Fedora 7 at the same time that Fedora Core and Fedora extras were merged. It introduced the concept of Karma and it was written in TurboGears 1.x and it is still in production today, seven years and many revisions later.

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Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst: In 2014, Open Source Innovation Is Going Mainstream

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Red Hat
Interviews

In the 2013 edition, he looked forward to 2014 as "a defining year for the technology industry. In Whitehurst's eyes, cloud computing was ripe for production-scale deployment, and Big Data analysis would start to yield real-world results. Web-based businesses took this step a couple of years ago, but this is where more traditional industries join the cloud-based revolution.

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Finding Wayland at Flock 2014

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Red Hat

Matthias goes on to point out that Wayland is actually not that hard to find in Fedora either — while it won’t be the default display server in Fedora 21, it is already including in the upcoming release for users to try out and test. To try out Wayland for yourself, just install the gnome-session-wayland-session package from the repositories, then select the GNOME on Wayland option from the session chooser when logging into your profile.

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How to think like open source pioneer Michael Tiemann

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Red Hat
Interviews
OSS

Ancient Greece had its Great Explainers, one of whom was Plato. The open source community has its Great Explainers, one of whom is Michael Tiemann.

Several thousand feet in the air, in a conference room on the 10th floor of Red Hat's Raleigh, NC headquarters, Tiemann is prognosticating. The place affords the kind of scope he relishes: broad, sweeping, stretched to a horizon that (this morning, anyway) seems bright. As the company's VP of Open Source Affairs explains what differentiates an open source software company from other firms in a crowded market, he exhibits the idiosyncrasy that has marked his writing for decades: the tendency to pepper his exposition of open source principles with pithy maxims from a diverse range of philosophers, politicians, political economists, and popular writers. It's a habit borne, he says, of the necessity of finding something that resonates with the many skeptics he's confronted over the years—because necessity, he quips (quoting Plato, of course), is the mother of all invention.

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Support for the 64Bit ARM architecture on Fedora 21 progressing nicely

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Red Hat

On the hardware side of things, Peter also recently blogged about some of the ARM hardware support that the newly released 3.16 Linux kernel will provide, including support for the NVIDIA Jetson TK1, Samsung EXYNOS, Qualcomm MSM 8×60, 8960 and 8974, APM X-GENE, and AMD Seattle. He also reports that the graphics driver support for ARM systems is also improving with nouveau, freedreno and etnaviv all possibly being supported on some specific ARM devices.

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Fedora 21 and ARM aarch64 status for alpha

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Red Hat
Hardware

With the Fedora 21 Alpha freeze looming in the rear view mirror, although the object wasn’t as close as it would appear, I thought it was high time that I gave a brief overview of the state of ARM aarch64 in Fedora. Some might assume the silence means not a lot has been happening but this is extremely far from the truth!

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Uselessd: A Stripped Down Version Of Systemd

The boycotting of systemd has led to the creation of uselessd, a new init daemon based off systemd that tries to strip out the "unnecessary" features. Uselessd in its early stages of development is systemd reduced to being a basic init daemon process with "the superfluous stuff cut out". Among the items removed are removing of journald, libudev, udevd, and superfluous unit types. Read more

Android One: Let us fill you in on Google’s big game

India is now the world’s third largest Internet market and “on a bullet train to become the second”. But even when we become the second with around 300 million Internet users, India would still have over 75 per cent of the population that has no access to this so-called information superhighway. It is this chunk of population that will form the “next billion” which companies like Nokia, and now Google, has been talking about. And it is this next billion that Google thinks will line up to buy and good smartphone that is also affordable. Read more

Mesa Gets Closer To Having OpenGL 4.0 Tessellation Support

A significant patch-set was published on Saturday night that implements the driver-independent bits of OpenGL 4's ARB_tessellation_shader extension inside Mesa. The tessellation support has been one of the big pieces missing from Mesa's OpenGL 4 implementation and fortunately it's getting close to mainline. Chris Forbes of Intel published fifty-six patches this weekend that implement the driver-independent portions of the extension inside Mesa. Of course, the driver portions still need to follow for it to be useful. Read more

Small Console Menu Utilities

One of the great strengths of Linux is the whole raft of weird and wonderful open source utilities. That strength does not simply derive from the functionality they offer, but from the synergy generated by using them together, sometimes in conjunction with applications. The Unix philosophy spawned a "software tools" movement which focused on developing concise, basic, clear, modular and extensible code that can be used for other projects. This philosophy remains an important element for many Linux projects. Good open source developers writing utilities seek to make sure the utility does its job as well as possible, and work well with other utilities. The goal is that users have a handful of tools, each of which seeks to excel at one thing. Some utilities work well on their own. This article looks at four tiny utilities that offer menu facilities. They get virtually zero coverage in the Linux press, so you may not have heard of them before, but they are well crafted and might just fit the bill. Read more