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Red Hat and Fedora

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Red Hat and Fedora

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An Everyday Linux User Review Of Fedora 25 - Oh No, So Many Problems

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Reviews

So where does that leave us?

I have always loved Fedora but I love music more and the amount of hassle and the amount of hoops I have had to jump through to try and get it working this time is just not worth the effort. The Google Chrome thing is also an issue for me. It works fine in openSUSE so why is it not working in Fedora?

Wayland seems to be performing well enough and I haven't experienced any problems that seem to be related to the graphical side of things.

Unfortunately I have witnessed far too many errors, notifications, application crashes and general pointless pain to be able to recommend Fedora 25. Fedora 23 worked great, 25 doesn't.

I recommend either CentOS or openSUSE for now.

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Red Hat and Fedora

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Fedora 25 Graphics and Fedora 27 Release Schedule

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  • Fedora 25: Wayland vs Xorg

    Almost as good as Alien vs Predator only much better. Anyhow, as you probably know, I have recently tested Fedora 25. It was an okay experience. Overall, the distro behaved reasonably well. Not the fastest, but stable enough, usable enough, with some neat improvements here and there. Most importantly, apart from some performance and responsiveness loss, Wayland did not cause my system to melt. But that's just a beginning.

    Wayland is in its infancy as a consumer technology, or at least that thing that people take for granted when they do desktop stuff. Therefore, I must continue testing. Never surrender. In the past few weeks of actively using Fedora 25, I did come across a few other issues and problems, some less worrying, some quite disturbing, some odd, some meaningless. Let us elaborate.

  • Fedora 27 Scheduled To Be Released On Halloween

    While Fedora 26 isn't even being released until June, today the Fedora Engineering and Steering Committee (FESCo) has approved the initial release schedule for Fedora 27.

    The approved schedule has the F27 branching from Rawhide on 25 July, a possible alpha release on 22 August, the beta release on 26 September, the final freeze on 17 October, and to do the official Fedora 27 release on 31 October. The approved Fedora 27 schedule can be found via this FESCo ticket.

Red Hat News

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Red Hat and Fedora

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  • Red Hat IT Single Sign On(SSO) Runs on Red Hat Virtualization

    Red Hat is best known for Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) and for being a leader in driving open source development projects. In many cases, the upstream projects then become Red Hat products that provide enterprise functionality elsewhere in the stack.

  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux Across Architectures: Everything Works Out of the Box

    Since the Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server for ARM Development Preview 7.3 became available I’ve been wanting to try it out to see how the existing code for x86_64 systems works on the 64-bit ARM architecture (a.k.a. aarch64).

    Going in, I was a bit apprehensive that some kind of heavy lifting would be needed to get things working on the ARM platform. My experience with cross-architecture ports with other distros (before I joined Red Hat) indicated going through dependency hell as I frantically tried to find equivalent packages for the ARM architecture. Needless to say, most of these porting exercises ended with massive amounts of productivity loss and potential security exposures as I downloaded packages from unknown sources, all the time hoping one of them would work.

  • NethServer 7 Server/Network-Focused Linux OS Released

    NethServer 7 is a CentOS derived Linux distribution designed for SOHO use-cases and makes it easy to setup a mail server, web server, DNS/DHCP server, and other common networking tasks via its modular design and web-based administrative interface.

  • 5 New features in RHEL 7 you should know about.
  • Why to Keeping Eye on Red Hat, Inc. (RHT), Amphenol Corporation (APH)?
  • The next big things, 2017 edition.

    Along with several people on the Fedora Engineering team, I recently attended the DevConf.cz 2017 event. The conference has grown into an amazingly successful gathering of open source developers. Most attendees live in Europe but there were some from every continent. The coverage spanned all the big open source buzz-generating technologies. Session topics included containers, PaaS, orchestration and automation, and DevOps.

  • Dealing with Mono under Fedora 25.
  • Earn Fedora Badges designing Badges!

    Fedora Badges is a perfect place to start if you want to help out the Fedora Design Team. “I’m not a designer!” “I can’t draw!” “I’ve never opened Inkscape” – you might say. And that is totally fine! Everybody can help out, and none of those reasons will stop you from designing your first badge (and getting badges for designing badges)!

  • Helping new users get on IRC, Part 2
  • Reducing the bandwidth requirements for keeping Fedora up to date

    Keeping your Fedora installation up to date can become a problem if your ISP imposes a strict datacap or if you’re stuck with only an expensive mobile data connection. Here are a few tricks for lowering Fedora’s system update bandwidth requirement.

Red Hat News

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NethServer 7 Linux OS Released with Nextcloud 10 Support, Based on CentOS 7.3

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Softpedia was informed today, February 8, 2017, by NethServer Community Manager Alessio Fattorini about the general availability of the NethServer 7 Linux-based operating system.

Based on CentOS 7.3, NethServer 7 launches with the ability for the Linux server OS to act as a Samba 4 Active Directory controller, replacing a Microsoft Active Directory domain controller. This is possible by implementing support for native Microsoft Windows management tools like AD PowerShell and RSAT.

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Leftovers: OSS

  • Are Low-Code Platforms a Good Fit for Feds?
    Open-source code platforms — in part, because they’re often free — have long been a popular choice for digital service creation and maintenance. In recent years, however, some agencies have turned to low-code solutions for intuitive visual features such as drag-and-drop design functionality. As Forrester Research notes, low-code platforms are "application platforms that accelerate app delivery by dramatically reducing the amount of hand-coding required."
  • Crunchy Data Brings Enterprise Open Source POSTGRESQL To U.S. Government With New DISA Security Technical Implementation Guide
    Crunchy Data — a leading provider of trusted open source PostgreSQL and enterprise PostgreSQL technology, support and training — is pleased to announce the publication of a PostgreSQL Security Technical Implementation Guide (STIG) by the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), making PostgreSQL the first open source database with a STIG. Crunchy Data collaborated with the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) to evaluate open source PostgreSQL against the DoD's security requirements and developed the guide to define how open source PostgreSQL can be deployed and configured to meet security requirements for government systems.
  • Democratizing IoT design with open source development boards and communities
    The Internet of Things (IoT) is at the heart of what the World Economic Forum has identified as the Fourth Industrial Revolution, an economic, technical, and cultural transformation that combines the physical, digital, and biological worlds. It is driven by such technologies as ubiquitous connectivity, big data, analytics and the cloud.

Software and today's howtos

Security and Bugs

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Devops embraces security measures to build safer software
    Devops isn’t simply transforming how developers and operations work together to deliver better software faster, it is also changing how developers view application security. A recent survey from software automation and security company Sonatype found that devops teams are increasingly adopting security automation to create better and safer software.
  • This Xfce Bug Is Wrecking Users’ Monitors
    The Xfce desktop environment for Linux may be fast and flexible — but it’s currently affected by a very serious flaw. Users of this lightweight alternative to GNOME and KDE have reported that the choice of default wallpaper in Xfce is causing damaging to laptop displays and LCD monitors. And there’s damning photographic evidence to back the claims up.