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Red Hat

Red Hat and Fedora

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Red Hat

Red Hat and Fedora

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Red Hat

Red Hat and Fedora

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Red Hat
  • CTU Training Solutions joins Red Hat Academy

    CTU Training Solutions announced it has collaborated with Red Hat to create the CTU Training Solutions Red Hat Academy. Red Hat Academy is an open source, Web-deployed and Web-managed education programme that is designed to provide turnkey curriculum materials to academic institutions to start and sustain an open source and Linux curriculum programme.

  • What Analysts are Predicting For AMETEK, Inc. (AME), Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)?
  • A discussion of Fedora's Legal state

    Tom Callaway, the Fedora Legal chair, will talk about the past, present, and future of licensing and legal issues in the Fedora community. Tom is not a lawyer, nor does he play one on TV, but he does consult with lawyers, and occasionally, go drinking with them. Bring your questions, and he'll do his best to answer them. I am not a lawyer, so nothing in my presentation should be (or could be) construed as legal advice.

    Fedora, as the evolution of Red Hat Linux, is one of the oldest and most well known Linux distributions in existence today. For more than 10 years, I have been the Fedora Legal representative who investigates licenses, negotiates with lawyers, advises our community, and does everything in my power to not have to tell people "no" without a very good reasoning.

  • Trying to get an idea about what packages are used
  • F25-20170210 Updated Lives released

    I am happy to announce new F25-20170210 Updated Lives.

  • Packaging Ampache in Fedora

    Hello Fedora Hackers! I've been working together with Remi Collet and Shawn Iwinski to package Ampache and its list of dependencies for Fedora. Ampache is a music server that allows you to listen to your music catalog in your web browser. There are even a variety of mobile applications that allow you to listen to your music on the go, such as DSub.

Red Hat News

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Red Hat

Red Hat and Fedora

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Red Hat

Red Hat and Fedora

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Red Hat

An Everyday Linux User Review Of Fedora 25 - Oh No, So Many Problems

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Red Hat
Reviews

So where does that leave us?

I have always loved Fedora but I love music more and the amount of hassle and the amount of hoops I have had to jump through to try and get it working this time is just not worth the effort. The Google Chrome thing is also an issue for me. It works fine in openSUSE so why is it not working in Fedora?

Wayland seems to be performing well enough and I haven't experienced any problems that seem to be related to the graphical side of things.

Unfortunately I have witnessed far too many errors, notifications, application crashes and general pointless pain to be able to recommend Fedora 25. Fedora 23 worked great, 25 doesn't.

I recommend either CentOS or openSUSE for now.

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Red Hat and Fedora

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Red Hat

Fedora 25 Graphics and Fedora 27 Release Schedule

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Red Hat
  • Fedora 25: Wayland vs Xorg

    Almost as good as Alien vs Predator only much better. Anyhow, as you probably know, I have recently tested Fedora 25. It was an okay experience. Overall, the distro behaved reasonably well. Not the fastest, but stable enough, usable enough, with some neat improvements here and there. Most importantly, apart from some performance and responsiveness loss, Wayland did not cause my system to melt. But that's just a beginning.

    Wayland is in its infancy as a consumer technology, or at least that thing that people take for granted when they do desktop stuff. Therefore, I must continue testing. Never surrender. In the past few weeks of actively using Fedora 25, I did come across a few other issues and problems, some less worrying, some quite disturbing, some odd, some meaningless. Let us elaborate.

  • Fedora 27 Scheduled To Be Released On Halloween

    While Fedora 26 isn't even being released until June, today the Fedora Engineering and Steering Committee (FESCo) has approved the initial release schedule for Fedora 27.

    The approved schedule has the F27 branching from Rawhide on 25 July, a possible alpha release on 22 August, the beta release on 26 September, the final freeze on 17 October, and to do the official Fedora 27 release on 31 October. The approved Fedora 27 schedule can be found via this FESCo ticket.

Red Hat News

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Someone is putting lots of work into hacking Github developers [Ed: Dan Goodin doesn't know that everything is under attack and cracking attempts just about all the time?]
    Open-source developers who use Github are in the cross-hairs of advanced malware that has steal passwords, download sensitive files, take screenshots, and self-destruct when necessary.
  • Security Orchestration and Incident Response
    Technology continues to advance, and this is all a changing target. Eventually, computers will become intelligent enough to replace people at real-time incident response. My guess, though, is that computers are not going to get there by collecting enough data to be certain. More likely, they'll develop the ability to exhibit understanding and operate in a world of uncertainty. That's a much harder goal. Yes, today, this is all science fiction. But it's not stupid science fiction, and it might become reality during the lifetimes of our children. Until then, we need people in the loop. Orchestration is a way to achieve that.

Leftover: Development (Linux)

  • Swan: Better Linux on Windows
    If you are a Linux user that has to use Windows — or even a Windows user that needs some Linux support — Cygwin has long been a great tool for getting things done. It provides a nearly complete Linux toolset. It also provides almost the entire Linux API, so that anything it doesn’t supply can probably be built from source. You can even write code on Windows, compile and test it and (usually) port it over to Linux painlessly.
  • Lint for Shell Scripters
    It used to be one of the joys of writing embedded software was never having to deploy shell scripts. But now with platforms like the Raspberry Pi becoming very common, Linux shell scripts can be a big part of a system–even the whole system, in some cases. How do you know your shell script is error-free before you deploy it? Of course, nothing can catch all errors, but you might try ShellCheck.
  • Android: Enabling mainline graphics
    Android uses the HWC API to communicate with graphics hardware. This API is not supported on the mainline Linux graphics stack, but by using drm_hwcomposer as a shim it now is. The HWC (Hardware Composer) API is used by SurfaceFlinger for compositing layers to the screen. The HWC abstracts objects such as overlays and 2D blitters and helps offload some work that would normally be done with OpenGL. SurfaceFlinger on the other hand accepts buffers from multiple sources, composites them, and sends them to the display.
  • Collabora's Devs Make Android's HWC API Work in Mainline Linux Graphics Stack
    Collabora's Mark Filion informs Softpedia today about the latest work done by various Collabora developers in collaboration with Google's ChromeOS team to enable mainline graphics on Android. The latest blog post published by Collabora's Robert Foss reveals the fact that both team managed to develop a shim called drm_hwcomposer, which should enable Android's HWC (Hardware Composer) API to communicate with the graphics hardware, including Android 7.0's version 2 HWC API.

today's howtos

Reports From and About Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF)