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Red Hat

Red Hat Summit and Latest Financial News

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Red Hat

Red Hat Summit News

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Red Hat

Gordon Haff (Red Hat) on Containers, OpenShift.io Launched, OpenShift Containers at AWS, Mozilla's Embrace of Containers

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Red Hat
Moz/FF

Red Hat and Fedora

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Red Hat

Red Hat's cloud love affair

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Red Hat

Sure, Red Hat is a major Linux company. Indeed, most would say it's the Linux company, but moving forward, what Red Hat wants to be is the private cloud company.

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Fedora: The Latest

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Red Hat
  • Bodhi And Quality Assurance

    Before one uses an item - be it a car, a piece of silicon, or even software - it is desirable to have assurances as to its quality. What assurances these are can vary depending on the part and use, but they are all some degree of "will this work as I expect it to when I use it".

    Linux distributions (distros), roughly speaking, have two styles of release: periodic stable (where there are formal releases of the distribution, like Debian or RHEL/CentOS) and rolling release (where the package versions are always updating, like Gentoo). These stable-release distributions are always frozen (in some fashion) from an associated rolling release, be it another distro or a special branch for this purpose. (So Debian freezes from its unstable/testing branches, while Fedora freezes from its rawhide branch, which is in turn approximately re-frozen to become RHEL/CentOS.) Although these associated rolling distros (sub-distros?) are usually intended primarily for improving the quality of the main distros, they often become commonly-run in their own right (Fedora, Debian testing).

    Of course there are quality assurance efforts involved in the freezing process, but I want to talk about the rolling efforts. Ultimately, we'd like some degree of assurance that package updates don't break (first) unrelated components on the system, (second) other packages that depend on it, and (third) expectations of direct users of the package. For each of these, there are automated tests that can be run (e.g., verifying dependencies, ABI compatibility checks, regression suites, etc.), and it is also desirable to have human verification as well. So let's look at some!

  • Share Fedora: Measuring Success
  • How to install V-Play cross-platform tool on Fedora
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Android Leftovers

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Debian Devs Urge Intel Skylake and Kaby Lake Users to Disable HyperThreading

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