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Red Hat

Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat

Red Hat introduces updated decision management platform

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Red Hat

Troubleshoot a network? No problem. Write a 3,000 word article on Kubernetes cloud container management? When do you want it. Talk to a few hundred people about Linux's history? Been there, done that. Manage a business's delivery routing and shift scheduling? I'll break out in a cold sweat.

If you too find the nuts and bolts of business processing management a nightmare, you'll want to check out Red Hat's latest program: Red Hat Decision Manager 7.

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Red Hat News and New Fedora 27 Live ISOs

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Red Hat

Red Hat: CO.LAB, Kubernetes/OpenShift, Self-Serving 'Study' and More

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Red Hat

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

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Red Hat

Red Hat and Fedora

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Red Hat

How to make sense of the Apache 2 patent license

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Red Hat
OSS
Legal

In essence, when a software developer contributes code to a project (i.e., the Work under the license), he or she becomes a Contributor. Under the above term, Contributors are granting permission to use any of their patents that may read on their contribution. This provides peace of mind to users since the Contributor would likely be prevented from pursuing patent royalties from any users of the software covering that contribution to the project.

Complexities arise when the software developer contributes code that is not claimed by any of the Contributor's patents by itself, but only when combined with the Apache 2.0 licensed open source program to which the contribution was made (i.e., the Work under the license). Thus, the Contributor owning such a patent could pursue patent royalties against a user of that revised Work. The authors of the Apache 2.0 license were forward thinking and account for this scenario. Section 3 states that the license applies to "patent claims licensable by such Contributor that are necessarily infringed... by a combination of their Contribution(s) with the Work to which such Contributions was submitted."

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Red Hat: CoreOS and Shares

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Red Hat

Fedora Might Begin Having A Release Manager

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Red Hat

Fedora developers are now discussing the possibility of naming a release manager each development cycle as a person in charge of wrangling together each release and seeing that the "Rawhide" development state is kept in better condition. Who knows, this also might actually help Fedora's longtime trouble of delivering releases on time.

Fedora Project Leader Matthew Miller started the mailing list discussion today about whether they should have a release manager each release cycle. His latest motivation for thinking about this is they haven't had a successful nightly compose of the latest Fedora Rawhide development state in about two weeks. While Red Hat employs QA and release engineering folks working on Fedora, their development tip isn't always kept in a release-able state unlike Ubuntu daily ISOs and some other Linux distributions.

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More in Tux Machines

Kernel: CH341 and LWN Articles (Just Freed)

  • Linux Adds CH341 GPIO
    There was a time when USB to serial hardware meant one company: FTDI. But today there are quite a few to choose from and one of the most common ones is the WCH CH341. There’s been support for these chips in Linux for a while, but only for use as a communication port. The device actually has RS232, I2C, SPI, and 8 general purpose I/O (GPIO) pins. [ZooBaB] took an out-of-tree driver that exposes the GPIO, and got it working with some frightening-looking CH341 boards.
  • Shrinking the kernel with an axe
    This is the third article of a series discussing various methods of reducing the size of the Linux kernel to make it suitable for small environments. The first article provided a short rationale for this topic, and covered link-time garbage collection. The second article covered link-time optimization (LTO) and compared its results to link-time garbage collection. In this article we'll explore ways to make LTO more effective at optimizing kernel code away, as well as more assertive strategies to achieve our goal.
  • The rest of the 4.16 merge window
    At the close of the 4.16 merge window, 11,746 non-merge changesets had been merged; that is 5,000 since last week's summary. This merge window is thus a busy one, though not out of line with its predecessors — 4.14 had 11,500 changesets during its merge window, while 4.15 had 12,599. Quite a bit of that work is of the boring internal variety; over 600 of those changesets were device-tree updates, for example. But there was still a fair amount of interesting work merged in the second half of the 4.16 merge window; read on for the highlights.

Wine-Staging and Games

Canonical Outs New Ubuntu Kernel Update with Compiler-Based Retpoline Mitigation

New Linux kernel security updates have been released for Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr), and Ubuntu 12.04 ESM (Extended Security Maintenance), adding the compiler-based retpoline kernel mitigation for the Spectre Variant 2 vulnerability on amd64 and i386 architectures. Canonical fixed the Spectre Variant 2 security vulnerability last month on January 22, but only for 64-bit Ubuntu installations. This update apparently mitigates the issue for 32-bit installations too. Spectre is a nasty hardware bug in microprocessors that use branch prediction and speculative execution and it could allow unauthorized memory reads via side-channel attacks. Read more

Tutanota: Encrypted Open Source Email Service for Privacy Minded People

If you are a privacy concerned netizen, try Tutanota. It is an open source email service for encrypted email communication. Here are the pros and cons of using Tutanota. Read more