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Red Hat

Red Hat and Fedora

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Red Hat

Fedora: The Latest (Flatpak, Wallpapers, and PHP)

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Red Hat
  • Flatpak and Snaps aren't destined for graveyard of failed Linux tech yet

    The world of Linux has long been divided into tribes, or distros as we called them. But what actually makes a distro? The packages it uses? The people who put those packages together? The philosophy behind the choices the people who put the packages together make? The question of what makes a distro is actually very difficult on to answer and it's about to get even more difficult.

    There's a change coming to the world of Linux that's potentially big enough to make us rethink what a distro is and how it works. That change is Ubuntu's Snap packages and the parallel effort dubbed Flatpaks.

    While these two projects differ in the details, for the purposes of this article I'll consider them the same thing and use the terms interchangeably.

  • Need a New Wallpaper? Fedora 26 Has You Covered!

    Fedora 26 will ship with a stunning set of community-contributed wallpapers, and as ever, the standard of entries in the contest is incredibly high.

  • Fedora 26 will look awesome with supplemental wallpapers
  • PHP version 7.0.19RC1 and 7.1.5RC1

Red Hat and Fedora

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Red Hat
  • Red Hat Bets on Innovation in the Channel

    Red Hat has launched the Red Hat Application Partner Initiative, working with partners to build a practice around core platforms for emerging use cases.

    IT solution providers tend to focus more on technologies that are just hitting the top of the bell curve in terms of mainstream adoption. But Red Hat is making a case for partners to place more focus on emerging technologies.

  • Huawei takes on servers, HPC and cloud with Red Hat, Intel and GE

    Company unveils plans to build high performance computing centres in in Shenzhen and Chengdu, China, and in Munich, Germany.

    Chinese ICT company Huawei has unveiled a series of agreements and collaborations with some of the world’s largest companies to advance cloud and high performance computing (HPC).

    Firstly, Huawei has signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with Intel to cooperate in HPC.

  • Red Hat Unveils JBoss AMQ 7

    Red Hat, Inc. (RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today introduced Red Hat JBoss AMQ 7. The latest release of Red Hat's messaging platform combines the performance and efficiency of reactive programming with a more flexible architecture, giving customers a strong foundation for building distributed, reactive message-driven applications.

  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT): What’s the Story?
  • FCAIC in the House, part III

    Ok, not that “Hello”. I’ve been writing quarterly updates on what I’m working on to help the Fedora Community. If you’re new to the party, welcome. I have the privilege of being the current Fedora Community Action and Impact Coordinator. I wrote last week on the Red Hat Community blog about what this role means and how it interacts with the world.

Fedora: The Latest

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  • Fedora Installation Workshop in Ranchi

    Fedora Installation workshop was organized at Ranchi, Jharkhand, India on 23 April, 2017 to introduce Fedora OS to local students and computer users. The workshop was conducted by Mohan Prakash and was attended mostly by undergraduate students. Fedora DVDs and stickers were distributed. The participants used Fedora Live and also installed Fedora on their machines. Mohan Prakash spoke about important packages shipped with the Fedora DVD and introduced different websites related to Fedora.

  • Flock Cod Registration Form Design
  • Encrypt all the Fedora Project

Red Hat News

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Red Hat
  • Red Hat announces the Red Hat 3scale API management platform
  • Red Hat Introduces Fully Containerized API Management Platform

    As the first major release of the platform following Red Hat's June 2016 acquisition of 3scale, Red Hat 3scale API Management – On Premise builds on Red Hat's vision to accelerate digital transformation and innovation with API-driven hybrid cloud architectures. Described as the “new language of collaboration,” APIs serve as the building blocks underpinning today's hyperconnected economy, driven by mobile, the Internet of Things (IoT), and new application architectures such as containers and microservices.

  • Red Hat debuts containerized API management platform to boost flexibility, scale and control
  • Catching up with Red Hat Mobile to talk about low code in the enterprise

    Low code is a movement that has emerged in the marketplace in recent times, not only for mobile but also for business process management (BPM) and other application development areas. What company can resist the pull of low-cost and relatively fast development times? Especially when it's as simple as a drag and drop gesture away. So it's not surprising that many big names are throwing themselves into the ring to see how well they can compete against other providers in a thriving marketplace.

  • Holistic approach imperative to digital transformation: Red Hat

    MALAYSIAN organisations embarking on digital transformation initiatives must embrace a holistic strategy that encompasses the deployment of a gamut of ideas and should not just approach it on a piecemeal basis, cautioned open source software giant Red Hat Inc.

    Speaking to the media after revealing a new study on enterprise mobility recently, Red Hat vice president and general manager for Asean Damien Wong (pic, bottom right) said the term digital transformation is being bandied about so much these days and companies are so keen to embrace it that they may not be approaching the process correctly.

  • Red Hat Brings Cloud-Native Java to OpenShift

    The latest release of OpenShift, Red Hat's packaged distribution of the open source Kubernetes container management and orchestration system, comes with new support for cloud-native Java.

    OpenShift already supported traditional Java EE applications, including fully integrated enterprise middleware services from the Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Middleware portfolio. Version 3.5 of the platform, announced last week, expands that support with a new Java container image for cloud-native workloads.

  • Red Hat job opening for Linux Graphics stack developer

    So we have a new job available for someone interested in joing our team and work on improving the Linux graphics stack. The focus of this job will be on GPU compute related work, but you should also expect to be spending time on improving the graphics driver stack in general. We are looking for someone at the Principal Engineer level, but I do recommend that even if you don’t feel you are quite at that level yet you should apply because to be fair the amount of people with the kind of experience we are looking for are few and far between, so in the end there is a chance we will hire two more junior developers instead if we have candidates with the right profile.

Red Hat After Graphics People

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Graphics/Benchmarks
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Red Hat News

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • Anonymous Open Source Projects
    He made it clear he is not advocating for this view, just a thought experiment. I had, well, a few thoughts on this. I tend to think of open source projects in three broad buckets. Firstly, we have the overall workflow in which the community works together to build things. This is your code review processes, issue management, translations workflow, event strategy, governance, and other pieces. Secondly, there are the individual contributions. This is how we assess what we want to build, what quality looks like, how we build modularity, and other elements. Thirdly, there is identity which covers the identity of the project and the individuals who contribute to it. Solomon taps into this third component.
  • Ostatic and Archphile Are Dead
    I’ve been meaning to write about the demise of Ostatic for a month or so now, but it’s not easy to put together an article when you have absolutely no facts. I first noticed the site was gone a month or so back, when an attempt to reach it turned up one of those “this site can’t be reached” error messages. With a little checking, I was able to verify that the site has indeed gone dark, with writers for the site evidently losing access to their content without notice. Other than that, I’ve been able to find out nothing. Even the site’s ownership is shrouded in mystery. The domain name is registered to OStatic Inc, but with absolutely no information about who’s behind the corporation, which has a listed address of 500 Beale Street in San Francisco. I made an attempt to reach someone using the telephone number included in the results of a “whois” search, but have never received a reply from the voicemail message I left. Back in the days when FOSS Force was first getting cranked up, Ostatic was something of a goto site for news and commentary on Linux and open source. This hasn’t been so true lately, although Susan Linton — the original publisher of Tux Machines — continued to post her informative and entertaining news roundup column on the site until early February — presumably until the end. I’ve reached out to Ms. Linton, hoping to find out more about the demise of Ostatic, but haven’t received a reply. Her column will certainly be missed.
  • This Week In Creative Commons History
    Since I'm here at the Creative Commons 2017 Global Summit this weekend, I want to take a break from our usual Techdirt history posts and highlight the new State Of The Commons report that has been released. These annual reports are a key part of the CC community — here at Techdirt, most of our readers already understand the importance of the free culture licensing options that CC provides to creators, but it's important to step back and look at just how much content is being created and shared thanks to this system. It also provides some good insight into exactly how people are using CC licenses, through both data and (moreso than in previous years) close-up case studies. In the coming week we'll be taking a deeper dive into some of the specifics of the report and this year's summit, but for now I want to highlight a few key points — and encourage you to check out the full report for yourself.
  • ASU’s open-source 'library of the stars' to be enhanced by NSF grant
  • ASU wins record 14 NSF career awards
    Arizona State University has earned 14 National Science Foundation early career faculty awards, ranking second among all university recipients for 2017 and setting an ASU record. The awards total $7 million in funding for the ASU researchers over five years.

R1Soft's Backup Backport, TrustZone CryptoCell in Linux

  • CloudLinux 6 Gets New Beta Kernel to Backport a Fix for R1Soft's Backup Solution
    After announcing earlier this week the availability of a new Beta kernel for CloudLinux 7 and CloudLinux 6 Hybrid users, CloudLinux's Mykola Naugolnyi is now informing us about the release of a Beta kernel for CloudLinux 6 users. The updated CloudLinux 6 Beta kernel is tagged as build 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.26 and it's here to replace kernel 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.25. It is available right now for download from CloudLinux's updates-testing repository and backports a fix (CKSIX-109) for R1Soft's backup solution from CloudLinux 7's kernel.
  • Linux 4.12 To Begin Supporting TrustZone CryptoCell
    The upcoming Linux 4.12 kernel cycle plans to introduce support for CryptoCell hardware within ARM's TrustZone.

Lakka 2.0 stable release!

After 6 months of community testing, we are proud to announce Lakka 2.0! This new version of Lakka is based on LibreELEC instead of OpenELEC. Almost every package has been updated! We are now using RetroArch 1.5.0, which includes so many changes that listing everything in a single blogpost is rather difficult. Read more Also: LibreELEC-Based Lakka 2.0 Officially Released with Raspberry Pi Zero W Support

Leftovers: Gaming