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Android

How to get married with Android Auto

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Android

It's been a year since the launch of the Open Automotive Alliance, which happened here in Las Vegas at CES 2014. Now, 12 months later, Android Auto is real. It's not out, exactly — you can't buy any cars or head units that have it installed quite yet — but it's coming in a matter of weeks, and that means that Google partners are out in force showing Android Auto devices you'll be able to own in 2015.

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Razer Cortex Lets You Stream PC Games to any Android Microconsole

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Android
Gaming

Plus, those without an Android device can pick up the new $99 quad-core Razer Forge TV microconsole.

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The powerful Saygus V2 supports up to 256GB of external storage

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Android

You may not be familiar with the company behind the V2 phone, and that is no surprise as Saygus is hardly a household brand. However, their new multimedia phone may just put them on your radar, with up to 320GB of internal storage and all the right specs to make a splash in the market.

Saygus is showing off their V2 Android powered smartphone at CES 2015, and we are on site to check it out. Stay tuned for a full video rundown to see how we feel about this 5-inch device.

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Fuhu's behemoth Android tablet has a 65-inch, 4K display

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Android

In its suite here, Fuhu mounted the display on the wall, like a television, but also embedded it inside a wooden table, as well as a poker table. Fuhu senior vice-president Lisa Lee said the company plans to sell furniture designed around the larger tablets, so they can serve as electronic play spaces.

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Sony’s $1200 Walkman ZX2 runs Android 4.2 Jelly Bean

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Android

Remember Sony’s Walkman from back in the 80s? Sony never stopped making them but they were eclipsed in later years first by iPods then by mobile phones. Now it looks like the Walkman is about to be reborn in a big and rather expensive way. Sony showed off its new Walkman ZX2 at CES 2015, and it’s going to cost $1200.

This version of the Walkman is obviously not geared toward the mass consumer market. Instead it’s designed for serious audiophiles who are willing to pay big bucks for what Sony hopes will be a premium sound experience. The Walkman ZX2 offers the following features according to Sony’s store page about it:

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Android Leftovers

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Android

Dacor's Android oven turns up the heat with voice activation

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Android

Ever wish you could preheat your oven before you got home to save yourself some dinner hassle? This spring, Dacor’s Android-based oven will hit store shelves with voice control you can use on the go.

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The OBox Is A Console’s Take On Android Gaming

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Android
Gaming

At CES this year, Snail, a Chinese gaming company, demoed a new console it is working to release early this year called the OBox. The device is essentially a modular — their word — computer that runs Android games.

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Sharp Announces 4K UHD TVs With Android TV Built-In

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Android

Google's lone Android TV box is getting some company, but not in the form of a more capable over-the-top box. Sharp has announced three new 4K TV series at CES 2015, and two of them have Android TV built-in. It'll cost you, though.

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Google hopes Android TV means third time lucky for their home invasion

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Android
Google
Movies

First was 2010’s Google TV software, which lost millions for hardware makers such as Logitech; second in 2013 was Chromecast, a memory stick-sized device to plug into your TV; it has sold “millions”, though Google won’t specify how many.

Now in 2015 there’s Android TV. Will it take off? The trouble with “connected TVs” is that though almost every TV now sold can go online, few owners take advantage of it.

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Red Hat News/Leftovers

Cloudgizer: An introduction to a new open source web development tool

Cloudgizer is a free open source tool for building web applications. It combines the ease of scripting languages with the performance of C, helping manage the development effort and run-time resources for cloud applications. Cloudgizer works on Red Hat/CentOS Linux with the Apache web server and MariaDB database. It is licensed under Apache License version 2. Read more

James Bottomley on Linux, Containers, and the Leading Edge

It’s no secret that Linux is basically the operating system of containers, and containers are the future of the cloud, says James Bottomley, Distinguished Engineer at IBM Research and Linux kernel developer. Bottomley, who can often be seen at open source events in his signature bow tie, is focused these days on security systems like the Trusted Platform Module and the fundamentals of container technology. Read more

TransmogrifAI From Salesforce

  • Salesforce plans to open-source the technology behind its Einstein machine-learning services
    Salesforce is open-sourcing the method it has developed for using machine-learning techniques at scale — without mixing valuable customer data — in hopes other companies struggling with data science problems can benefit from its work. The company plans to announce Thursday that TransmogrifAI, which is a key part of the Einstein machine-learning services that it believes are the future of its flagship Sales Cloud and related services, will be available for anyone to use in their software-as-a-service applications. Consisting of less than 10 lines of code written on top of the widely used Apache Spark open-source project, it is the result of years of work on training machine-learning models to predict customer behavior without dumping all of that data into a common training ground, said Shubha Nabar, senior director of data science for Salesforce Einstein.
  • Salesforce open-sources TransmogrifAI, the machine learning library that powers Einstein
    Machine learning models — artificial intelligence (AI) that identifies relationships among hundreds, thousands, or even millions of data points — are rarely easy to architect. Data scientists spend weeks and months not only preprocessing the data on which the models are to be trained, but extracting useful features (i.e., the data types) from that data, narrowing down algorithms, and ultimately building (or attempting to build) a system that performs well not just within the confines of a lab, but in the real world.