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Android

Intel Partners With ARM Chip Maker Rockchip on Tablet Products

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Android

Intel is turning to a Chinese chip maker with a history in ARM processors to help it expand deeper into the highly competitive low-end Android tablet market. Intel officials on May 27 announced a partnership with Rockchip in which the companies will build a new family of mobile SoFIA systems-on-a-chip (SoCs) that will feature Intel's x86 Atom platform and its 3G wireless modem technology. The Intel-branded processors will help the giant chip maker fill a hole in its planned SoFIA lineup that initially included a dual-core 3G version expected to hit the market later this year, and a quad-core 4G LTE version scheduled for the first half of 2015.

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Ubuntu Devs Work on Porting Android Apps to Ubuntu Linux

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Android
Ubuntu

So far, most of the talk about Ubuntu convergence—Canonical's effort to make Ubuntu Linux run on smartphones and tablets as well as traditional PCs—is about hardware compatibility. But what about building the applications that Ubuntu mobile users will need? That's a problem Ubuntu developers are now beginning to solve, too.

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MIPS supporters form a Linaro-like collaboration

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Android
Linux

Imagination has joined with Broadcom, Ingenic, Qualcomm, and others to form a non-profit group called “Prpl” to build MIPs-based Linux and Android software.

With Prpl, Imagination Technologies aims to replicate some of the success of rival ARM’s Linaro non-profit firm, which has helped to stabilize and standardize Linux and Android code across a variety of licensed platforms. Just as ARM formed Linaro with many of its licensees, Imagination has tapped MIPS licensees like Broadcom, Cavium, and Ingenic Semiconductor as founding members.

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FSF statement on Court of Appeals ruling in Oracle v Google

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Android
Google
Legal

The situation then is substantially similar to the situation today. The key difference is that some of Google's affirmative defenses to claim non-infringement have been eliminated by this new ruling. The FSF now sincerely hopes for the next best thing to Alsup's original ruling: that Google is successful in its fair use defense.

Notwithstanding our support of Google's fair use defense, the FSF urges caution to all prospective Android users. Even though the core of the Android system is free, every Android device sold comes pre-loaded with a variety of proprietary applications and proprietary hardware drivers. The FSF encourages users to support the development of Replicant, a distribution of Android that is 100% free software. The FSF also encourages users of any Android-based system to install F-Droid, a free replacement for the Google Play app that allows users to browse, install, and receive updates from a repository of free software Android apps. Replicant uses F-Droid as its default repository.

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Microsoft's China Syndrome

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Android
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

The history of Linux in China is chequered. Android is doing extremely well there, even if it tends to be varieties that are more or less independent from Google (no bad thing.) But on the desktop, GNU/Linux has had a pretty disastrous showing. That's strange, because you would think that the Chinese authorities would jump at the chance to adopt a free operating system that was independent of the US, and which could be inspected for NSA backdoors even before the current Snowden leaks showed why that would be a good idea.

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Best Business Apps for Chrome and Chrome OS

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Android
Google

Chrome is going places these days. Google's browser-turned-desktop is proving out to be a dark horse in the OS marketplace. A few years after its first release, Chrome has turned itself into a veritable threat to Microsoft's dominant empire. The recent Scroogled campaign targeted at Chromebooks only seems to confirm the fact that Google is slowly spreading its claws into a domain that is solely controlled by Redmond.

For business owners, Chrome offers a lot of choices. It is free from the cycle of operating systems and the agony they bring with their difficult licensing, while also in sync with most of the Google services they already use. Those benefits aside, Chromebooks are cheap, well designed, and are extremely fast. The success of Chromebooks is worrying Microsoft so much that they cut Windows licensing fee by a significant amount.

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Android-x86 4.4 RC2 KitKat Is a Linux Distro for PCs Based on the OS from Google

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Android
Linux
Google

Some of you might not know this, but Android is actually based on the Linux kernel, although the Google developers are releasing it with a modified version of the kernel. This has been the case right from the beginning and the Android source has been released under a number of open source pieces of software.

This doesn't mean that any company can get the source code and start shipping devices with the OS just because it is open source. The problem is a little more complicated than this and it has to do with the type of license. The source code may be open source, but if you plan to make money off it you will need to cut Google a part of your pie, if by any chance you are going to also use services like Gmail or any other proprietary software.

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8 Things We Want from Amazon's Rumored Smartphone

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Android

Amazon, the company behind the most successful e-book reading device in the market has decided to spread its wings once again. The retail giant has been making many technological endeavors recently. First, they came up with Kindle, which was wildly successful. Then came Kindle Fire, which was a direct competitor to the Nexus line of tablets. If competing with Google wasn't enough one time, Amazon came up with Kindle Fire TV. Now, if the rumors are true, Amazon is coming up with a new smartphone. Will it succeed? We don't know. But we do have some expectations from the retail megastore.

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Google’s Chromecast sells more than 100k units in just 2 months in the UK

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Android

Google introduced the £30 Chromecast in the UK back in March following the successful launch of the device in the US. Compared to the sale figure of more than a million devices shipped in the US, the 100k figure does pale in comparison, but nonetheless it is a solid start for the device in a new land. Also, given that fact that the device isn’t as pricey as some of its other competitors like Apple’s AirPlay and Roku 3, the Chromecast have a very good probability of being a dominant force in the field.

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Rugged Android 4.0 handheld does NFC

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Android

Adlink has released a rugged, Android 4.0 handheld with a 1.2GHz dual-core Qualcomm SoC, 3.8-inch WVGA display, NFC, 3G, and a 5-megapixel barcoding camera.

Adlink’s IMX-3000 handheld computer updates its earlier IMX-2000 model. This in turn is a slightly revised version of its first Android handheld, the circa-2011 TIOT 2000. The IMX-3000 is designed for applications including retail, logistics, on-site inspection, warehousing, and transportation, says Adlink.

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More in Tux Machines

Graphics: Mesa and AMDGPU

  • Mesa 17.3.3 Released With RADV & ANV Vulkan Driver Fixes
    Mesa 17.3.3 is now available as the latest point release for the Mesa 17.3 stable series. This bi-weekly point release to Mesa presents several RADV Vega/GFX9 fixes, various Intel ANV Vulkan driver fixes, a DRI3 fix, and random fixes to the OpenGL drivers like RadeonSI, Etnaviv, and even Swrast.
  • R600g "Soft" FP64 Shows Signs Of Life, Enabling Older GPUs To Have OpenGL 4 In 2018
    Most pre-GCN AMD graphics cards are still limited to OpenGL 3.3 support at this time due to not supporting FP64. Only the HD 5800/6900 series on R600g currently have real double-precision floating-point support working right now so at present they are on OpenGL 4.3 rather than 3.3, but those other generations may be catching up soon thanks to the "soft" FP64 code.
  • AMDGPU DC Gets More Raven Ridge Improvements, Audio Fixes
    Harry Wentland of AMD has sent out the latest batch of patches for the AMDGPU DC display code stack. Fortunately it lightens up the DRM driver by about six thousand lines thanks to removing some unused code. Besides gutting out a chunk of unused code, the DC code has a few audio fixes (no word yet on supporting newer audio formats with DC), fixes on driver unload, a "bunch" of continued Raven Ridge display updates, and various other code clean-ups.
  • AMDGPU Firmware Blobs Updated For Video Encode/Decode
    There are updated AMDGPU microcode/firmware files now available for recent Radeon GPUs. The updated firmware files now available via the main linux-firmware.git repository are centered around the video blocks: UVD video decoding, VCE video encode, and the new VCN video encode/decode block with Raven Ridge.

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Tumbleweed Update

  • Tumbleweed Rolls Forward with New versions of Mesa, Squid, Xen
    This week provided a pretty healthy amount of package updates for openSUSE’s rolling distribution Tumbleweed. There were three snapshots released since the last blog and some of the top packages highlighted this week are from Mesa, Squid, Xen and OpenSSH. The Mesa update from version 17.2.6 to 17.3.2 in snapshot 20180116 provided multiple fixes in the RADV Vulkan driver and improvements of the GLSL shader cache. The Linux Kernel provides some fixes for the security vulnerabilities of Meltdown in version 4.14.13 and added a prevent buffer overrun on memory hotplug during migration for KVM with s390. The snapshot had many more package updates like openssh 7.6p1, which tightened configuration access rights. A critical fix when updating Flatpak packages live was made with the gnome-software version 3.26.4 update. File systems package btrfsprogs 4.14.1 provided cleanups and some refactoring while wireshark 2.4.4 made some fixes for dissector crashes. Xen 4.10.0_10 added a few patches. Rounding out the snapshot, ModemManager 1.6.12 fixed connection state machine when built against libqmi and blacklisted a few devices to include some Pycom devices.
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed Rolls To Mesa 17.3, Linux 4.14.13
    OpenSUSE has continued rolling in the new year with several key package updates in January. Exciting us a lot is that openSUSE Tumbleweed has migrated from Mesa 17.2 to now Mesa 17.3. Mesa 17.3.2 is the version currently in openSUSE's rolling-release.

India Digital Open Summit 2018