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IPFire: A User-Friendly Linux Firewall Distribution

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Android

Securing your network is an incredibly challenging task, one that’s made even more difficult by software that adds yet another layer of complexity on top. And let’s face it, most firewall tools are the stuff of user nightmare. That’s why, when a firewall tool strips away some of that complexity, it deserves attention.

One such tool is IPFire, an open source Linux distribution geared specifically for the task of firewalls. This particular distribution is hardened, secure, easy to operate, and ready to serve enterprise, small-to-medium businesses, and even home users. IPFire was designed for users new to firewalling, so it places a premium on user-friendliness.

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Verizon to launch a Palm-branded smartphone this year

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Android

Palm is staging a comeback and America’s largest wireless provider, Verizon, will lend a helping hand. Back in August 2017, TCL (Palm’s parent organisation) Marketing Manager Stefan Streit had revealed that new Palm devices would be announced in early 2018. Now citing a “trusted source”, Android Police reports that TCL will launch a Palm-branded smartphone on Verizon later this year.

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Meet OpenAuto, an Android Auto emulator for Raspberry Pi

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Android
Linux

In 2015, Google introduced Android Auto, a system that allows users to project certain apps from their Android smartphones onto a car's infotainment display. Android Auto's driver-friendly interface, with larger touchscreen buttons and voice commands, aims to make it easier and safer for drivers to control navigation, music, podcasts, radio, phone calls, and more while keeping their eyes on the road. Android Auto can also run as an app on an Android smartphone, enabling owners of older-model vehicles without modern head unit displays to take advantage of these features.

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eelo is more than tech, it’s a societal project for Freedom and Democracy

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Android
OSS

Computer systems, and more specifically software and data networks, have been driving the way the world has evolved recently. Software is now everywhere: in cars, trains and planes, in your house, in businesses and in industry….Smartphones are taking over our lives

Since 2007, software has also taken control in our personal lives: smartphones have become our companions of life. They empower us with new abilities. They help us find information quickly, they help us with directions, they help us to communicate quickly and at a low cost with other people anywhere in the world.

The digital age we’re presently living in is a “far west quest”. The few who understand how things work are releasing products which often gain quick and massive adoption: people who were born before 1998 can remember a world where Facebook and Google didn’t exist.

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Devices and More: Raspberry Pi, Tizen, Android, and GuixSD

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Android
Linux
Debian
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More in Tux Machines

Thunderbolt 3 in Fedora 28

  • The state of Thunderbolt 3 in Fedora 28
    Fedora 28 is around the corner and I wanted to highlight what we did to make the Thunderbolt 3 experience as smooth as possible. Although this post focuses on Fedora 28 for what is currently packaged and shipping, all changes are of course available upstream and should hit other distributions in the future.
  • Thunderbolt 3 Support Is In Great Shape For Fedora 28
    Red Hat developers have managed to deliver on their goals around improving Thunderbolt support on the Linux desktop with the upcoming Fedora 28 distribution update. This has been part of their goal of having secure Thunderbolt support where users can authorize devices and/or restrict access to certain capabilities on a per-device basis, which is part of Red Hat's Bolt project and currently has UI elements for the GNOME desktop.

New Heptio Announcements

Android Leftovers

New Terminal App in Chome OS Hints at Upcoming Support for Linux Applications

According to a Reddit thread, a Chromebook user recently spotted a new Terminal app added to the app drawer when running on the latest Chrome OS Dev channel. Clicking the icon would apparently prompt the user to install the Terminal app, which requires about 200 MB of disk space. The installation prompt notes the fact that the Terminal app can be used to develop on your Chromebook. It also suggests that users will be able to run native apps and command-line tools seamlessly and securely. Considering the fact that Chrome OS is powered by the Linux kernel, this can only mean one thing. Read more