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Android

Android Leftovers

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Android
  • Android Things exits beta with OTA goodies and licensing restrictions

    Google released Android Things 1.0 with new ARM-based production platforms and a surprise gift: three free years of OTA support. But commercial production over 100 units requires a licensing deal.

    A year and a half after Google announced that its stripped down, IoT-oriented Brillo version of Android was being recast as Android Things, the platform has emerged from Developer Preview as Android Things 1.0. The good news is that Google is offering customers free automated updates for three years, which should save money while improving security and reliability. The bad news is that Android Things is more proprietary than the mostly open source Android.

  • 22 Best Android P Features: What’s New In The Latest Version?

    Google I/O 2018 brought Android P Beta which unveiled several new features in its latest mobile OS, Android P.

    While the name of Android version 9.0 still remains a mystery, we got to see a bunch of cool and exciting features. This year Google is focused on making our digital lives more calm and organized through Android P.

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  • Android P SELinux Rules to Finally Block Apps from Monitoring Network Activity

Four Android Things production boards span Cortex-A7, -A35, and -A53

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Android

Google unveiled four ARM-based production boards for Android Things 1.0: Innocomm’s i.MX8M based WB10-AT, Intrinsyc’s Open-Q 212A and Open-Q 624A, based on the Snapdragon 212 and 634, respectively, and the MediaTek MT8516.

Earlier this week, Google released Android Things 1.0 and announced several consumer products that will ship in the coming months based on the stripped-down, IoT-oriented Android variant. Google also showed off four official production platforms.

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More in Tux Machines

GNU/Linux: Parrot 4.0, Oregan, Containers and Linux 4.18 Plans

  • Parrot 4.0 is out
    Parrot 4.0 has been released. Parrot is a security-oriented distribution aimed at penetration tests and digital forensics analysis, with additional tools to preserve privacy.
  • Parrot 4.0 release notes
  • Oregan launches SparQ middleware for Linux and Android TV
    Oregan said that the open standards-based offering resolves the differences between the current security and performance requirements of modern-day TV services and the hardware capabilities of STBs that were deployed up to a decade ago.
  • Linux app support coming to older Chrome OS devices
    Linux apps on Chrome OS is one of the biggest developments for the OS since Android apps. Previous reports stated Chromebooks with certain kernel versions would be left in the dust, but the Chrome OS developers have older devices on the roadmap, too. When Google first broke silence on Linux app functionality, it was understood that Linux kernel 4.4 was required to run apps due to dependencies on newer kernel modules. Thanks to an issue found on Chromium’s public bugtracker, we have confirmation that containers won’t be limited to the handful of Chrome OS devices released with kernel 4.4.
  • Looking Ahead To The Linux 4.18 Kernel
    There still are several weeks to go until the Linux 4.17 kernel will be officially released and for that to initiate the Linux 4.18 merge window, but we already know some of the features coming to this next kernel cycle as well as an idea for some other work that may potentially land.

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

Security Bugs and FUD

Canonical founder Mark Shuttleworth takes aim at VMware and Red Hat at OpenStack Summit

“Google, IBM, Microsoft [are] all investing and innovating to drive down the cost of infrastructure. Every single one of those companies engages with Canonical to deliver public services,” he said. “Not one of them engages with VMware to offer those public services – they can’t afford to. Clearly they have the cash, but they have to compete – and so does your private cloud.” To capitalise on this trend, the firm is in the throes of rolling out a migration service to help users shift from VMware to a “fully managed” version of Canonical’s Ubuntu OpenStack distribution, which Shuttleworth said costs half as much to run. “When we take out VMware, and displace VMware, we are regularly told that a fully managed OpenStack solution costs half of the equivalent VMware estate [to run],” he added. Read more