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Android Wear 2.0 debuts on two LG watches

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Android

Google released Android Wear 2.0, available on the new LG Watch Style and Sport, with an overhauled UI, autonomy, LTE, app downloads, and Google Assistant.

Google’s Android Wear distribution for smartwatches and wearables has cumulatively held its own against the Apple Watch, but considering the sorry state of the smartwatch market in general, that’s not saying much. Google is giving it at least one more shot, however, with the release of the Android Wear 2.0.

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Android Leftovers

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Android Wear 2.0 review: Google's second swing at smartwatches

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Android
Reviews

Wear 2.0 is launching first on a pair of new watches from LG that were designed in conjunction with Google: the $349 Watch Sport and the $249 Watch Style. And if you happen to be one of those people who did buy an Android Wear watch before, it’s likely coming to your wrist, too.

The Watch Sport and Watch Style are meant to showcase all of the new features found in Wear 2.0, from Android Pay, to LTE connections, to the improved Google Assistant. They are the cutting edge of Google-powered watches, but they won’t be alone for long — you can expect many more Android Wear watches running the platform to arrive this year.

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LG K8 Review: The Best Looking Budget Android Phone Around

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Android
Reviews

The high-end segment of the smartphone space is dominated by Apple and Samsung. This has been the case for a good couple of years now, and most other OEMs seldom get a look in.

Apple shifted over 70 million iPhones during its last financial quarter; that is an insane number of units – even more so when you consider how much iPhones cost.

For this reason – and plenty more besides – many Android phone makers are focussing their efforts on the sub-£150 segment of the phone market. Here things are equally competitive, as tech brands constantly innovative and redefine what we consider to be a budget-friendly phone, but, importantly, there is no Apple and there’s more room to manoeuvre.

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Android Leftovers

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Android

Qseven COM runs Android or Linux on i.MX6

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Android
Linux

DFI’s “FS700” Qseven 1.2 module expands upon NXP’s i.MX6 with up to 2GB of DDR3, up to 16GB eMMC, a microSD slot, SATA, CAN, and PCIe.

Embedded board vendors never seem to tire of the venerable Cortex-A9-based i.MX6 SoC. The latest is DFI Technologies’ FS700, which joins other 70 x 70mm Qseven modules running the i.MX6, including Aaeon’s AQ7-IMX6.

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Android Leftovers

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Android

Android Leftovers

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Android

Lenovo introduces $300 Yoga A12 convertible Android tablet with Halo keyboard

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Android

Lenovo today is introducing the Yoga A12 convertible tablet, a variation on its $500 Yoga Book with a larger display, stripped down specs, and a rose gold color option, alongside the more typical gunmetal gray. The device will be available on February 8 through Lenovo’s website, starting at $300.

Whereas the Yoga Book was available with full Windows 10 or Android, the Yoga A12 is only available with Android. And while the Yoga A12 includes the Yoga Book’s controversial flat Halo keyboard — whose keys light up and provide distinctive haptic feedback when tapped — it doesn’t come with the ability to use the keyboard as a writing surface with the included “real pen” and paper for digital capture.

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Also: Lenovo's latest Android tablet is really a budget laptop

Lenovo's Yoga A12 Android 2-in-1 has futuristic touch panel keyboard

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UKSM Is Still Around For Data Deduplication Of The Linux Kernel

Several years back we wrote about Ultra Kernel Samepage Merging (UKSM) for data de-duplication within the Linux kernel for transparently scanning all application memory and de-duping it where possible. While the original developer is no longer active, a new developer has been maintaining the work and continues to support it on the latest Linux kernel releases. Read more

Why Dell’s gamble on Linux laptops has paid off

The whole juggernaut that is now Linux on Dell started as the brainchild of two core individuals, Barton George (Senior Principal Engineer) and Jared Dominguez (OS Architect and Linux Engineer). It was their vision that began it all back in 2012. It was long hours, uncertain futures and sheer belief that people really did want Linux laptops that sustained them. Here is the untold story of how Dell gained the top spot in preinstalled Linux on laptops. Where do you start when no one has ever really even touched such a concept? The duo did have some experience of the area before. George explained that the XPS and M3800 Linux developer’s laptops weren’t Dell’s first foray into Linux laptops. Those with long memories may remember Dell testing the waters for a brief while by having a Linux offering alongside Windows laptops. By their own admission it didn’t work out. “We misread the market,” commented George. Read more Also: New Entroware Aether Laptop for Linux Powered with Ubuntu

A Short MATE Desktop 1.17 Review in February 2017

MATE 1.17 is a testing release, it has no official announcement like 1.16 stable release (odd = unstable, even = stable). But what made me interested is because Ubuntu MATE 17.04 includes it by default so I write this short review. The most fundamental news is about MATE Desktop is now completely ported to GTK+3 leaving behind GTK+2. You may be interested seeing few changes and I have tried Ubuntu MATE 17.04 Alpha 2 to review MATE 1.17 below. Enjoy MATE 1.17! Read more Also: What's up with the hate towards Freedesktop?