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Android

Galaxy Note8 review: An overpriced S8+ with a pen is still a pretty great phone

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Android
Reviews

A little under a year ago, I'd have said that there might not be a Galaxy Note8 at all. Of course, I'd have been wrong. But after the Note7's disastrous recall episode, it seemed perfectly fair to ask whether the Galaxy Note would continue be a thing. After all, battery fires aside, the Note really didn't seem to be the focus of Samsung's smartphone development the way it once was. The Note7 wasn't much more than a stretched, squared-off Galaxy S7 edge. And even before that, the Note5 wasn't much different from the pen-less Galaxy S6 Edge+ it debuted alongside. If there were a perfect time to call it quits on the Note series, a major recall followed by a total product cancellation would have been it.

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Tanoshi is an Android laptop for kids with Google's parental control Family Link app pre-installed

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Android
Google

There is no shortage of tablets and computers aimed at children, but one Silicon Valley startup is betting its bootlaces that kids and parents will lap up its new Android-powered laptop-tablet hybrid.

The Tanoshi is touted as a “fun, safe, educational, and affordable” two-in-one computer designed with pre-teens in mind, and it is among the first machines to ship with Family Link — Google’s recently announced parental control app — pre-installed.

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Android 8.0 Oreo, thoroughly reviewed

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Android
Reviews

Android 8.0 Oreo is the 26th version of the world's most popular operating system. This year, Google's mobile-and-everything-else OS hit two billion monthly active users—and that's just counting phones and tablets. What can all those users expect from the new version? In an interview with Ars earlier this year, Android's VP of engineering Dave Burke said that the 8.0 release would be about "foundation and fundamentals." His team was guided by a single question: "What are we doing to Android to make sure Android is in a great place in the next 5 to 10 years?"

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Security in Android, Windows

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Android
Microsoft
Security
  • With Android Oreo, Google is introducing Linux kernel requirements

    Android may be a Linux-based operating system, but the Linux roots are something that few people pay much mind. Regardless of whether it is known or acknowledged by many people, the fact remains that Android is rooted in software regarded as horrendously difficult to use and most-readily associated with the geekier computer users, but also renowned for its security.

  • Exclusive: India and Pakistan hit by spy malware - cybersecurity firm [Ed: When you use Microsoft Windows in government in spite of back doors]

    Symantec Corp, a digital security company, says it has identified a sustained cyber spying campaign, likely state-sponsored, against Indian and Pakistani entities involved in regional security issues.

    In a threat intelligence report that was sent to clients in July, Symantec said the online espionage effort dated back to October 2016. 

    [...]

    Symantec’s report said an investigation into the backdoor showed that it was constantly being modified to provide “additional capabilities” for spying operations.

100 days of postmarketOS

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Android
Linux

We are building an alternative to Android and other mobile operating systems by not forking but bending the time-proven Alpine Linux distribution to fit our purpose. Instead of using Android's build process, we build small software packages that can be installed with Alpine's package manager. To minimize the amount of effort for maintenance, we want every device to require only one device-specific package and share everything else.

At this point our OS is only suitable for fellow hackers who enjoy using the command-line and want to improve postmarketOS. Telephony or other typical smartphone tasks are not working yet.

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Also: LG V30 hands on—LG’s OLED displays still have quality issues

Kernel, Android, and Graphics

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Android
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Google is Mandating Linux Kernel Versions in Android Oreo

    Google has been offering Android as a mobile operating system for close to a decade. The company acquired it in 2005, unveiled it to the public in 2007 and then in 2008 we saw the first commercially available Android smartphone. There are some rules and limitations that Google has in place for a company to be allowed to use the main configuration of Android (which they have faced legal action about in the past), but for the most part they’re giving companies free reign with certain aspects. One aspect that has been up to the OEM is the Linux kernel version but this is changing with Android Oreo.

    As long as the OEM was able to pass the certification tests that Google lays out, then they didn’t care what kernel version was used in a new device. This generally wasn’t an issue as most OEMs would use the same version of the kernel for that generation that other OEMs were using, as it is tied heavily to what the hardware drivers support. However, some had been falling through the cracks and this started to cause security issues. This is something that Google has been taking seriously lately so it makes sense that they would want to start mandating this.

  • Android Support For Intel's ANV Vulkan Driver
  • VA-API Gets Extended With Flexible Encoding Infrastructure

    Intel added a new extension to the VA-API video acceleration API over the summer called the Flexible Encoding Infrastructure.

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More in Tux Machines

Chromium and Firefox: New Features

  • Chromebook Owners Will Soon Be Able to Monitor CPU and RAM Usage in Real-Time
    Chromium evangelist François Beaufort announced today that Google's Chrome OS engineers have managed to implement a new feature that will let Chromebook owners monitor the CPU usage, RAM, and zRam statistics in real-time. The feature was implemented in the Chrome Canary experimental channel and can be easily enabled by opening the Google Chrome web browser and accessing the chrome://flags/#sys-internals flag. There you'll be able to monitor your Chromebook's hardware and see what's eating your memory or CPU during heavy workloads, all in real-time. "Chrome OS users can monitor in real-time their CPU usage, memory and zRam statistics thanks to the new internal page chrome://sys-internals in the latest Canary," said François Beaufort in a Google+ post. "For that, enable the experimental chrome://flags/#sys-internals flag, restart Chrome, and enjoy watching real-time resource consumption."
  • Tracking Protection for Firefox for iOS Plus Multi-Tasking in Focus for Android New Today
    Across the industry, September is always an exciting month in mobile, and the same is true here at Mozilla. Today, we’re launching the newest Firefox for iOS alongside an update for the popular Firefox Focus for Android, which we launched in June.

Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) Is Now Powered by Linux Kernel 4.13, GCC 7.2

Greg Kroah-Hartman published on Wednesday new maintenance updates for various of the supported Linux kernel branches that he maintains, including the Linux 4.12 series, which appears to have reached end of life. Read more

The ISS just got its own Linux supercomputer

A year-long project to determine how high-performance computers can perform in space has just cleared a major hurdle -- successfully booting up on the International Space Station (ISS). This experiment conducted by Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) and NASA aims to run a commercial off-the-shelf high-performance computer in the harsh conditions of space for one year -- roughly the amount of time it will take to travel to Mars. Read more

Qt 5.6.3 Released

I am pleased to inform that Qt 5.6.3 has been released today. As always with a patch release Qt 5.6.3 does not bring any new features, just error corrections. For details of the bug fixes in Qt 5.6.3, please check the change logs for each module. Read more