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Android

Android Leftovers

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Android
  • Google Launches a New Issue Tracker, Used for Android and the GCP

    Exactly one month ago, Google announced they had just launched a new Issue Tracker project for their Google Cloud Platform products. Until now, if you wanted to submit a bug about a Google product then you were pointed at a code.google.com URL. For Android, this would be the AOSP Issue Tracker and it would be the Chromium Issue Tracker for Chrome. This worked fine for a while, but even this issue tracker had some bugs and it just looked like a dated system.

  • Sorry Windows, Android is now the most popular end-user operating system

    For decades, the answer to the question "What's the most popular operating system?" was Windows. You may not have liked it, but macOS, OS/2, Linux, you name it, couldn't knock it off its pedestal. But, then along came smartphones and tablets, and PCs started their long sales decline. In March 2017, by web-analytics company StatCounter's reckoning, Android became more popular than Windows.

  • Android is more popular than Windows... for getting online [iophk: "at those figures the monopoly rents will become unobtainable and without additional income, such as stock trading, the bubble will pop"]

    Usage figures published by StatCounter show that Android accounted for 37.93 percent of the worldwide OS Internet usage share in March. Windows is not far behind at 37.91 percent, but Android taking the lead is being described as a "milestone in technology history."

    [...]

    Windows is starting to lose out overall, although it still accounts for 84 percent of the worldwide desktop operating system market.

  • Android overtakes Windows for first time
  • Android beats Windows as most popular OS for interwebz – by 0.02%

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Tiny, temp-resistant SBC runs Android 6.0 on Snapdragon 820

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Android

iWave has launched a rugged, 56 x 50mm “iW-RainboW-G25S” SBC with a Snapdragon 820 SoC, up to 6GB of LPDDR4 RAM, up to 128GB eMMC, WiFi, BT, and GPS.

The iW-RainboW-G25S single board computer, which iWave also calls the APQ8096 SBC and Snapdragon 820 SBC, runs Android Marshamallow on Qualcomm’s quad-core APQ8096 SoC, better known as the Snapdragon 820. Designed for high-end embedded applications that require high processing power, graphics and multimedia capabilities, the SBC weighs in at a tiny 56 x 50mm and supports -20 to 85°C temperatures.

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Android's popularity eclipses Windows among internet users

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Android
Microsoft

The stat trackers at StatCounter have come out with their internet usage numbers for the month of March, and they have, for the first time, reported Android as the world's most popular operating system. Nudging ahead of the once-untouchable Windows by a tiny fraction, Android is now the world's most-used platform for getting online according to these latest figures. This represents a natural progression from the difference in devices shipped every year — more than a billion for Android versus 200-something million PCs per year for Windows — but StatCounter is among the first to claim that Android is now in the lead in usage numbers as well.

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Samsung Galaxy S8 vs LG G6: which Android phone is better?

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Android

Our Samsung Galaxy S8 vs LG G6 comparison is here, to give you all the info you need to help you decide which South Korean phone maker’s new handset is best for you in 2017.

Sure, they look different in terms of design and internal specs, but the dimensions, weight, and many key features are exactly the same. Android phone buyers have a tough choice on their hands.

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Google an Android

Filed under
Android
Google
  • Winning the Google Open Source Lottery

    I don't know about you, but I frequently get mails announcing that I was picked as the lucky winner of a lottery, compensation program or simply as "business associate". Obvious Spam of course, that never happens in reality. Just like my personal "favorite" at the moment: Mails notifying me of inheritance from a previously (more or less) unknown relative. Its just that this is what has happend basically a few weeks ago in reality to me (over the phone through) – and I am still dealing with the bureaucracy required of teaching the legal system that I have absolutely no intention of becoming the legal successor of someone I haven't seen in 20 years, regardless of how close the family relation is on paper… but that might be the topic of another day.

    [...]

    You have probably figured out by now that I didn't know that program before. Kinda embarrassing for a previous Google Summer of Code student (GSoC is run by the same office), but the idea behind it is simple: Google employees can nominate contributors to open source stuff for a small monetary "thank you!" gift card. Earlier this week winners for this round were announced – 52 contributors including yours truly. You might be surprised, but the rational given behind my name is APT (I got a private mail with the full rational from my "patron", just in case you wonder if at least I would know more).

  • The open Android is the most important Android.

    Android is one of the largest and most popular collections of open source software that has even seen the light of day. But the Android you're getting when you buy the next important phone isn't, and we have to wonder if anyone really cares.

    [...]

    This history and some new rumors have plenty of folks concerned. Around the water cooler, talk suggests that much of what will be great in Android O is really a collection of things that will be great in the Google Pixel 2 or whatever its name will be. When we say great, we mean things that improve the lives of the people using it. The changes at the building block level are awesome in their own right, and so far what we've seen will all become part of Android and available for everyone who wants to download the code. But when it comes to the user-facing side, the idea that Google can keep exciting stuff for its own products is a concern to open-source evangelists like me.

  • Here's how to enable Picture-in-Picture mode in Android O right now
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More in Tux Machines

Microsoft Begs, Bugs, and Bug Doors

  • Don't install our buggy Windows 10 Creators Update, begs Microsoft
    Microsoft has urged non-tech-savvy people – or anyone who just wants a stable computer – to not download and install this year's biggest revision to Windows by hand. And that's because it may well bork your machine. It's been two weeks since Microsoft made its Creators Update available, and we were previously warned it will be a trickle-out rather than a massive rollout. Now, Redmond has urged users to stop manually fetching and installing the code, and instead wait for it to be automatically offered to your computer when it's ready.
  • Microsoft Word flaw took so long to fix that hackers used it to send fraud software to millions of computers
    A flaw in Microsoft Word took the tech giant so long to fix that hackers were able to use it to send fraud software to millions of computers, it has been revealed. The security flaw, officially known as CVE-2017-0199, could allow a hacker to seize control of a personal computer with little trace, and was fixed on April 11 in Microsoft's regular monthly security update - nine months after it was discovered.

FOSS Licensing (and Lack Thereof)

  • Portugal to harmonise usability of govt portals
    All of the code, information and tools are made available for reuse.
  • JRC: ‘Releasing code without a licence hinders reuse’
    Projects that publish source code without a licence weaken the reusability of their code, warns Stefano Gentile, a copyright and trademark specialist working for the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre (JRC). Currently just 20 % of all projects published on GitHub, one of the most popular source code sharing platforms, have selected a licence for their work - down from about 60% in 2008, Gentile said, quoting numbers published in 2015 by GitHub.
  • React to React
    The Additional Grant of Patent Rights is a patent license grant that includes certain termination criteria. These termination criteria are not entirely unprecedented when you look at the history of patent license provisions in OSI-approved licenses, but they are certainly broader than the termination criteria [or the equivalent] in several familiar modern licenses (the Apache License 2.0, EPL, MPL 2.0, and GPLv3).
  • BetConstruct declares the source code for its front-end as open source
    The project is distributed under MIT license.

Automotive Grade Linux Adds New Members

Red Hat and Fedora

  • Red Hat Bets on Innovation in the Channel
    Red Hat has launched the Red Hat Application Partner Initiative, working with partners to build a practice around core platforms for emerging use cases. IT solution providers tend to focus more on technologies that are just hitting the top of the bell curve in terms of mainstream adoption. But Red Hat is making a case for partners to place more focus on emerging technologies.
  • Huawei takes on servers, HPC and cloud with Red Hat, Intel and GE
    Company unveils plans to build high performance computing centres in in Shenzhen and Chengdu, China, and in Munich, Germany. Chinese ICT company Huawei has unveiled a series of agreements and collaborations with some of the world’s largest companies to advance cloud and high performance computing (HPC). Firstly, Huawei has signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with Intel to cooperate in HPC.
  • Red Hat Unveils JBoss AMQ 7
    Red Hat, Inc. (RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today introduced Red Hat JBoss AMQ 7. The latest release of Red Hat's messaging platform combines the performance and efficiency of reactive programming with a more flexible architecture, giving customers a strong foundation for building distributed, reactive message-driven applications.
  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT): What’s the Story?
  • FCAIC in the House, part III
    Ok, not that “Hello”. I’ve been writing quarterly updates on what I’m working on to help the Fedora Community. If you’re new to the party, welcome. I have the privilege of being the current Fedora Community Action and Impact Coordinator. I wrote last week on the Red Hat Community blog about what this role means and how it interacts with the world.