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Announcing Rockstor 3.9.0

Filed under
GNU
Linux

We’ve just wrapped up a fun release cycle, and it’s my pleasure to announce Rockstor 3.9.0. Our community has been really active and we’ve prioritized nicely to improve on a few different areas. 5 contributors have come together for this release and besides working on new features and bug fixes, we made significant improvements to code quality. @phillxnet has made a big enhancement to the disk management subsystem. I’ve made large code quality improvement to backend Python stack. @MFlyer collaborated with me on that and took upon himself to do the same for all of Javascript stack. He made several ninja style contributions and helped fix many bugs. I’d say this is a nice release with some new stuff and a bunch of useful maintenance updates. Thanks to everyone that made this happen!

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Linux on Servers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server
OSS
  • DevOps still very much a work in progress, survey suggests

    That's the key takeaway from a recent survey of 2,045 IT managers and professionals, released by Quali, an IT automation solutions provider. While most people in enterprises would say at this point that they have DevOps underway in some shape or form, achieving agility is another story.

  • IBM chases Google, Microsoft with Kubernetes in the cloud

    It's only a matter of time before every major cloud vendor offers a version of Kubernetes as a service. Now it’s IBM’s turn.

  • In The Virtualization Space, Containers Are Making A Move

    Wow has it been a whirlwind over the last ten years in the virtualization space. Where once Xen and then KVM sat on the pedestal, the baton has been passed to the projects revolved around containers. Names like Docker, Kubernetes and Mesos are most often mentioned. As is generally the case in the FLOSS arena, evolution is a constant. Therefore, if one is in the DevOps arena, it is time to familiarize yourself with containers if you have not already done so.

  • The DOE and NSA Construct Doomsday Scenario for American HPC

    One last point. The Chinese economy continues to expand faster than that of the US, and, depending on who you talk to, will reach the size of the US sometime between 2018 and 2028. Such an economy would be expected to field an HPC capability on par with that of the US. Furthermore, China and the US should both be able to maintain an indigenous and self-sustaining HPC capability for their own use, and it’s unreasonable to think either could prevent the other from doing so. In such a world, the US may no longer enjoy technological supremacy, but it can surely have the wherewithal to control its own future in HPC.

  • [Older] Getting Down To Bare Metal On The Cloud

    When you think of the public cloud, the tendency is to focus on the big ones, like Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure, or Google Cloud Platform. They’re massive, dominating the public cloud skyline with huge datacenters filled with thousands of highly virtualized servers, not to mention virtualized storage and networking. Capacity is divvied up among corporate customers that are increasingly looking to run and store their workloads on someone else’s infrastructure, hardware that they don’t have to set up, deploy, manage or maintain themselves.

  • Avoid complex infrastructure when building simple things

    For local development, go crazy. For real production use.. I think you should avoid this until you’re the size of business that someone else will do this for you. If this seems controversial do the math: include backing it up, patching it, keeping it highly available, the time spent not working on your differentiating features etc. There are plenty of datastore services available that will do all this for you and let you focus your limited time on your app, and they’re really very cheap when you consider the actual cost of running a production database. Write your app so that the cost of moving to your own database later if you need to is unlikely to be high. Managing a simple web app instead of managing a web app, a production database, a message queue etc is a big win.

  • DebConf17 welcomes its first eighteen sponsors!

    DebConf17 will take place in Montreal, Canada in August 2017. We are working hard to provide fuel for hearts and minds, to make this conference once again a fertile soil for the Debian Project flourishing. Please join us and support this landmark in the Free Software calendar.

  • [OT] Smartphone App: Retro Recorder and Call Recorder for your Tizen mobile

antiX 17 Linux Alpha 2 ISO Images Are Based on Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch"

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

The developers of the Debian-based antiX Linux operating system released today new Alpha builds of the upcoming antiX 17 series, the first public images based of Debian Stretch.

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Emmabuntus Debian Edition 1.02 Lands Based on Debian GNU/Linux 8.7, Xfce Desktop

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

Patrick Emmabuntüs is informing Softpedia today about the immediate availability for download of the Debian-based Emmabuntus Debian Edition 1.02 operating system.

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ExTiX 17.2 – “The Ultimate Linux System” – with LXQt 0.10.0 and kernel 4.10.0-14-exton – Build 170320

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I have made a new version of ExTiX – The Ultimate Linux System. I call it ExTiX 17.2 LXQt Live DVD.

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Solus Users Get MATE 1.18 and Linux Kernel 4.9.16, Budgie 10.3 Coming Very Soon

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Solus maintainer Joshua Strobl is informing users of the independently-developed GNU/Linux distribution about the availability of some of the latest updated packages, as well as upcoming features.

According to the developer, it would appear that the feature-rich MATE 1.18 desktop environment released last week is now available for installation from the official stable Solus repositories for users of the Solus MATE edition, along with the long-term supported Linux 4.9.16 kernel and numerous other up-to-date components.

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Arch Linux-Based ArchEX Distro Is Powered by LXQt Desktop, Linux Kernel 4.10.3

Filed under
GNU
Linux

GNU/Linux developer Arne Exton is known for all sort of distributions most of which are derivatives of some of the most popular Linux-based operating systems, and he informs us this weekend about the availability of a new build of his ArchEX distro.

ArchEX is an Arch Linux-based distribution built around the lightweight LXQt desktop environment. The new things implemented in ArchEX Build 170318 is the recently released Linux 4.10.3 kernel, as well as all the latest package versions that have been released on the official Arch Linux repositories.

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Releases already covered here: 4MLinux 22.0 Launches July 2017 Based on GCC 6.2.0 and the Linux 4.9 LTS Kernel

Zorin OS 12.1 Education Promises to Make Learning Better and More Impactful

Desktop GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • The Linux Migration: Other Users' Stories, Part 2

    This post is part of a series of posts sharing the stories of other users who have decided to migrate to Linux as their primary desktop OS. Each person’s migration (and their accompanying story) is unique; some people have embraced Linux only on their home computer; others are using it at work as well. I believe that sharing this information will help readers who may be considering a migration of their own, and who have questions about whether this is right for them and their particular needs.

  • The Linux Migration: Other Users' Stories, Part 3

    Over the last few weeks, I’ve been sharing various users’ stories about their own personal migration to Linux. If you’ve not read them already, I encourage you to check out part 1 and part 2 of this multi-part series to get a feel for why folks are deciding to switch to Linux, the challenges they faced, and the benefits they’ve seen (so far). Obviously, Linux isn’t the right fit for everyone, but at least by sharing these stories you’ll get a better feel whether it’s a right fit for you.

  • [Video] system76 Lemur Laptop Impressions

    I bought a laptop from a company which supports Linux. Only one major downside so far: stickers.

  • Microsoft blocks updates for new cpus on Windows 7 and 8.1

    This meant basically that only Windows 10 would support Intel's, AMD's and Qualcomm's new processors, while Windows 7 or 8.1 would not.

  • What's wrong with Microsoft?

    What happens then? Well, there's the rub. Windows is heavily dependent on it's biggest problem. The only thing it really has going for it is how easy it is to use. MS can point at Linux and say how hard it would be to switch, and people will happily agree. Today.

    But what happens in a few years, when the clueless have been replaced by the clued-up? When Linux's increasing ease-of-use meets the decreasing amount of cluelessness? What happens when there's no real barrier to entering the FOSS world and people start comparing OS functionality instead of GUI aesthetics?

  • How to use a Chromebook: 10 must-know tips, tricks, and tools for beginners

Why you need to use Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Windows, the OS we all know and have grown to love. It’s no wonder it’s so popular with its incredible security, privacy features, bug-free nature, great customer support and all round good value for money – Right?

Hang on, wait that doesn’t sound quite right…

Enter Linux.

Chances are you’ve probably heard of the operating system but for one reason or another you’re still using your boring old Windows.

Perhaps you’re still unconvinced or just not yet ready to take the plunge? Allow me to convince you.

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4MLinux 22.0 BETA released.

Filed under
GNU
Linux

4MLinux 22.0 BETA is ready for testing. Basically, at this stage of development, 4MLinux BETA has the same features as 4MLinux STABLE, but it provides a huge number of updated packages, including major changes in the core of the system, which now uses the LTS Linux kernel 4.9 series and the GNU Compiler Collection 6.2.0.

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More in Tux Machines

This Week's Mesa 17.1-dev + Linux 4.11 Radeon Performance vs. NVIDIA

Given all the recent performance work that's landed recently in Mesa Git for Mesa 17.1 plus the Linux 4.11 kernel continuing to mature, in this article are some fresh benchmarks of a few Radeon GPUs with Mesa 17.1-dev + Linux 4.11 as of this week compared to some GeForce graphics cards with the latest NVIDIA proprietary driver. Basically this article is to serve as a fresh look at the open-source Radeon vs. closed-source NVIDIA Linux gaming performance. The Radeon tests were using the Linux 4.11 kernel as of 20 March and the Mesa 17.1-dev code also as of 20 March. The NVIDIA driver used was the 378.13 release. Ubuntu 16.10 was running on the Core i7 7700K test system. Read more

Announcing Rockstor 3.9.0

We’ve just wrapped up a fun release cycle, and it’s my pleasure to announce Rockstor 3.9.0. Our community has been really active and we’ve prioritized nicely to improve on a few different areas. 5 contributors have come together for this release and besides working on new features and bug fixes, we made significant improvements to code quality. @phillxnet has made a big enhancement to the disk management subsystem. I’ve made large code quality improvement to backend Python stack. @MFlyer collaborated with me on that and took upon himself to do the same for all of Javascript stack. He made several ninja style contributions and helped fix many bugs. I’d say this is a nice release with some new stuff and a bunch of useful maintenance updates. Thanks to everyone that made this happen! Read more

Toughened up PC/104 SBC runs Linux

WinSystems unveiled a rugged “PCM-C418” SBC with a dual-core, Vortex86DX3SoC, Fast and Gigabit Ethernet ports, SATA and CF storage, and PC/104 expansion. The WinSystems PCM-C418 SBC offers a combination of PC/104 expansion, GbE and Fast Ethernet ports, shock and vibration resistance, and a Linux-friendly, x86-based Vortex86DX3 SoC — attributes shared by the Diamond Systems Helix and Adlink CM1-86DX3. Like the Helix, it also supports -40 to 85°C temperatures. Read more

Blender - Your FOSS 3D Software

If you are into game development, video editing, or 3D modeling as a professional or a hobby, then Blender is a tool you should definitely look at. Blender is a FOSS solution/alternate to many commercial tools that are available and it is able to strongly match most of these commercial tools. Blender is a cross-platform application which means you can not only run it on Linux but also on Windows and MacOS. Blender is well suited to individuals and small studios who benefit from its unified pipeline and responsive development process. It supports the entirety of the 3D pipeline, anything from modeling, rigging, animation, simulation, rendering, compositing and motion tracking, video editing and game creation. Read
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