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GNU

Software: ncmpcpp, GNU Make and gedit

Filed under
GNU
Software

  • Ncmpcpp: The Best MPD Client With The Worst Name - YouTube

    I picked a good place to start with MPD client, I think it's fair to say that ncmpcpp might be one of the best mpd clients that exist, I'll be trying out other but I don't know how anything will top this one.

  • Things I do: Proposal to add build graph output to GNU Make

    In 2015 I worked as a consultant at a large company in Lund. My position was with the build team and one of our responsibilities was managing and maintaining the build system for their Android based phones.

    The problem I was tasked with solving was the fact that running 'make' for a product after a successful build resulted in a lot of stuff being rebuilt unnecessarily.

    A stock Android build tree behaved nicely: a second run of 'make' only produced a line about everything being up-to-date. But the company products were taking a good 15 minutes for a rebuild even if nothing had been changed.

    The Android build system works by including all recipes to be built (programs / libraries / etc) using the GNU Make include directive, so that you end up with one giant Makefile that holds all rules for building the platform. Possibly to avoid the problems laid out in the paper Recursive make considered harmful.

  • Sébastien Wilmet: gedit crowdfunding

    The gedit text editor has a long history of development, it has been created in 1998 at the beginnings of GNOME. So it is one of the oldest GNOME application still alive and usually installed by default with Linux distributions that provide GNOME as their desktop environment.

    It is this – the fact that many Linux users know and have gedit installed – that motivates me to improve it, to make it a top notch core application. It is not an easy undertaking though, the codebase is old and large, and there are several underlying software components (libraries) that are critical for the main functioning of gedit.

Audiocasts/Shows: Ubuntu Podcast, ZaReason Review and BSD Now

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD
  • Ubuntu Podcast S13E31 – Cheers with water

    This week we’ve been upgrading computers and Ebaying stuff. We discuss the Windows Calculator coming to Linux, Microsoft Edge browser coming to Linux, Ubuntu Community Council elections and LibreOffice office getting Yaru icons. We also round up our picks from the general tech news.

  • Review - The Verix 9100 Linux Laptop from ZaReason

    Time for another laptop review! This time I have the Verix 9100 in the studio sent over from ZaReason, an awesome local Linux laptop vendor that has some great hardware available.

  • BSD Now #373: Kyle Evans Interview

    We have an interview with Kyle Evans for you this week. We talk about his grep project, lua and flua in base, as well as bectl, being on the core team and a whole lot of other stuff.

GNU RCS 5.10.0 available

Filed under
Development
GNU

release notes:

  A spate of bugfixes, new support for nanosecond mtime, etc.

README excerpt:

  GNU RCS (Revision Control System) manages multiple revisions of files.
  RCS can store, retrieve, log, identify, and merge revisions.
  It is useful for files that are revised frequently, e.g.,
  programs, documentation, graphics, and papers.

NEWS for 5.10.0 (2020-10-20):

  - bug fixes

    - RCS file search skipped RCS/FILENAME by default

      The default set of candidate filenames for the RCS file is:

       RCS/FILENAME,v
       RCS/FILENAME
       FILENAME,v

      RCS 5.8 (released 2011-08-30) introduced a bug which caused the
      default RCS file search to skip RCS/FILENAME.  Regression fixed.

    - ‘rlog -w’ behaved like ‘rlog’ (sans ‘-w’)

      RCS 5.8 (released 2011-08-30) introduced a bug which caused
      ‘rlog -w’ (without any logins specified) to fail to default to
      the user login.  Instead it behaved as if option ‘-w’ were
      omitted entirely.

      The cases where logins are specified (e.g., ‘rlog -wjrhacker’)
      were not affected.

    - missing string in comma-v detected, diagnosed

      Previously, if foo,v contained fragment:

       1.1
       log
       text
       @@

      i.e., there was no string value following the ‘log’ keyword,
      then rlog (et al) would interpret that as an "empty log message"
      instead of as a violation of the RCS file format grammar, which
      stipulates that a string value must follow the keywords ‘desc’,
      ‘log’ and ‘text’ -- (info "(rcs) comma-v grammar").

      Now, such a situation causes rlog (et al) to abort w/ message
      "missing string after KEYWORD" (KEYWORD ∈ {desc, log, text}).

    - subsecond resolution maintained for ‘-d’, ‘-T’

      An RCS ‘delta’ includes a ‘date’ component w/ second (whole
      number) resolution.  Previously, on filesystems that support
      subsecond (fractional) resolution for the file modification time
      (aka "mtime"), RCS commands given the ‘-d’ and/or ‘-T’ options
      would disregard, on read, and specify 0 (zero), on write, the
      fractional mtime.

      Now, RCS preserves subsecond mtime in those cases.  More details
      in new manual section -- (info "(rcs) Stamp resolution").

  - portability fixes

    - now buildable under ‘gcc -std=c11’ (default for GCC 5)

      RCS previously failed to build under ‘-std=c11’, which happens
      to be the default mode of GCC 5.  In particular, ‘-std=c11’ is
      more strict about function attributes syntax than ‘-std=c99’.

      Now, the offending code has been rectified.  (Specifically,
      attribute ‘_Noreturn’ now is at the start of a func decl.)

    - threads support

      RCS itself is clueless about threads, but it uses gnulib, which
      may or may not require threads support.  This manifests as the
      configure script options ‘--enable-threads=MODEL’ as well as
      ‘--disable-threads’.

      Previously, "make" would ignore MODEL (even implicitly), acting
      as if ‘--disable-threads’ were specified.  Now, it takes into
      account MODEL by propagating makefile var ‘LIBTHREAD’.

    - consult ‘USER’ first if ‘LOGNAME’ read-only

      To determine the user (login) name in the absence of a specific
      command-line option, RCS normally checks first the env var
      ‘LOGNAME’ and second, ‘USER’.  Alas, this is unworkable under
      AIX, where ‘LOGNAME’ is read-only.  So now, if the configure
      script finds ‘LOGNAME’ to be read-only, it arranges to build RCS
      to check ‘USER’ first and then ‘LOGNAME’.  See README.

    - configure script avoids ‘date -r’

      Unfortunately ‘date -r’ is not POSIX.  This made AIX unhappy.

    - other AIX accomodation

      The AIX compiler complains about the implicit casting that
      occurs when returning a pointer from a function whose return
      type is ‘bool’.  So, we are now explicit.

  - documentation improvements

    - docfix: add "Log message option" to Detailed Node Listing

      Probably Emacs by now has some automagic way to sync the
      ‘@detailmenu’ section w/ the text body... hmmm.

    - style change due to ‘-zZONE’ option

      Specifying option ‘-zZONE’ to ‘rcs log’ changes the date output
      style to use hyphens (ISO) instead of slashes (YYYY/MM/DD).

    - rlog, use with CVS

      Since RCS 5.8 (released 2011-08-30), there have been sporadic
      reports of rlog (aka "rcs log") failing with CVS files.  The
      manual now addresses this -- (info "(rcs) comma-v particulars").

    - delim-separated list

      GNU RCS has always supported comma to separate items in a list
      (e.g., ‘rcs frob -o1.1,2.2’ to remove (or "outdate") revisions
      1.1 and 2.2).  But did you know that most places a comma is
      welcome and you can use other delimiter characters as well?
      Read all about it -- (info "(rcs) Delim-separated list").

    - (style) pargraphs no longer indented

      This looks nicer (IMHO) for Info and Text output formats.

  - testing improvements

    Many new tests and test cases for existing tests were added, to
    catch regressions and exercise infrequent code paths.  For "make
    check" (locally), function coverage is 97.3% (considered "high")
    and line coverage is 84.9% (considered "medium"), per lcov.

  - bootstrap/maintenance tools

    upgraded:

     GNU gnulib 2020-10-19 23:37:09
     GNU texinfo 6.7
     GNU Automake 1.16.2
     GNU Autoconf 2.69c

    as before:

     (none)

tarballs and detached signatures:

  http://ftpmirror.gnu.org/rcs/rcs-5.10.0.tar.lz
  http://ftpmirror.gnu.org/rcs/rcs-5.10.0.tar.lz.sig
  http://ftpmirror.gnu.org/rcs/rcs-5.10.0.tar.xz
  http://ftpmirror.gnu.org/rcs/rcs-5.10.0.tar.xz.sig

source code:

  https://git.savannah.gnu.org/cgit/rcs.git/?h=p

homepage:

  https://www.gnu.org/software/rcs/

Read more

Audiocasts/Shows: Coder Radio, The Linux Link Tech Show, Talk Python and FLOSS Weekly

Filed under
Development
GNU
Linux
  • Leaping Lizard People | Coder Radio 384

    It's confession hour on the podcast, and your hosts surprise each other with several twists and turns.

  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 876

    repairing 3ds, power issues, ubuntu 20.10, games

  • Episode #287 Testing without dependencies, mocking in Python - [Talk Python To Me Podcast]

    We know our unit tests should be relatively independent from other parts of the system. For example, running a test shouldn't generally call a credit card possessing API and talk to a database when your goal is just to test the argument validation.

    And yet, your method does all three of those and more. What do you do? Some languages use elaborate dependency passing frameworks that go under the banner of inversion of control (IoC) and dependency injections (DI). In Python, the most common fix is to temporarily redefine what those two functions do using patching and mocking.

    On this episode, we welcome back Anna-Lena Pokes to talk us through the whole spectrum of test doubles, dummies, mocks, and more.

  • FLOSS Weekly 601: Open Source Creative - Blender, Gimp, Audacity

    Looking at open source software from a creative lens and discussing the importance and ease of using open-source software to make art, graphics, video, and more. Doc Searls and Jonathan Bennett talk with Jason van Gumster a creator, engineer, and host of the podcast, Open Source Creative. They talk about the positive side of customizing your workplace with open source software such as Blender, Gimp, Hydrogen, and Audacity. They also discuss the simplicity of open source creative software support and the great community surrounding open source creative software.

Septor 2020.5

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Tor Browser is fully installed (10.0.2)
System upgrade from Debian Buster repos as of October 21, 2020
Update Linux Kernel to 5.9.0-1
Update Thunderbird to 78.3.1-2
Update Tor to 0.4.4.5
Update Youtube-dl to 2020.09.20

Read more

Regressions in GNU/Linux Evolution

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • When "progress" is backwards

    Lately I see many developments in the linux FOSS world that sell themselves as progress, but are actually hugely annoying and counter-productive.

    Counter-productive to a point where they actually cause major regressions, costs, and as in the case of GTK+3 ruin user experience and the possibility that we'll ever enjoy "The year of the Linux desktop".

    [...]

    We live in an era where in the FOSS world one constantly has to relearn things, switch to new, supposedly "better", but more bloated solutions, and is generally left with the impression that someone is pulling the rug from below one's feet. Many of the key changes in this area have been rammed through by a small set of decision makers, often closely related to Red Hat/Gnome/freedesktop.org. We're buying this "progress" at a high cost, and one can't avoid asking oneself whether there's more to the story than meets the eye. Never forget, Red Hat and Microsoft (TM) are partners and might even have the same shareholders.

  • When "progress" is backwards

Streaming services, beware: International Day Against DRM (IDAD) is coming Dec. 4

Filed under
GNU
Movies
Web

The fourteenth International Day Against DRM (IDAD) is coming soon, and the Defective by Design (DbD) campaign needs your help to spread the word. This year's annual day in protest of Digital Restrictions Management (DRM) will be on December 4th, 2020, and will focus on streaming services' unjust use of DRM. We need your help to spread that message far and wide to both anti-DRM activists and those simply concerned with how in a world with continued technological advancement, our digital freedoms are increasingly under threat.

While in quarantine, we've all been conscious of how the way we engage with our favorite films, television, and music has been changing. Many (if not most) homes connected to a high-speed Internet connection have turned to streaming services that peddle DRM to seek entertainment, subjecting themselves to onerous restrictions in exchange for a way to pass the time. The Defective by Design campaign exists to raise awareness about the injustice of these services and other ways that media conglomerates use DRM to deprive computer users of their freedom.

In the last few years since the rise of these services, we've seen their influence grow from a mere drop in the bucket of video distribution to a stranglehold on global culture. Each more poorly named and unnecessary than the last, these services dictate what we watch, surveil us while we watch it, and through it all, make use of digital restrictions to keep viewers helpless and unable to exert meaningful control on how they choose to experience movies, music, and television. Not only do they keep subscribers trapped in the "walled gardens" of their service, but these dis-services dictate exactly how the works they distribute can be viewed, down to mandating the use of proprietary software and hardware that curtails user freedom. We deserve better.

Read more

10 Linux Based Mini PCs to Buy in 2020

Filed under
GNU
Linux

It won’t be wrong to say that mini PCs have all the potential in the world to take over the computer market shortly. Not only do they save a lot of space on your computer desk but also work in a very power-efficient manner while also causing less noise. Although they could be a tad more expensive than regular desktop PCs, they will actually save you some money in the long run.

With that being said, one thing that should be noted here is that most of these mini PCs are not as powerful as your regular desktop computers when it comes to processing power, memory size, and storage space. Accordingly, users who don’t plan on either gaming or video editing should definitely give these computers a shot.

The 10 Best Linux-based Mini PCs

Mini PCs aren’t anything new since they’ve been in the computer market for quite a while now. However, the number of such computers that have optimal support for Linux distros is still relatively small. So, in this article, we’re going to do all the research for you and provide you with some of the best Linux-based mini PCs out there right now.

Read more

Magazines and Shows: Linux Format, Firewalls, Destination Linux and mintCast

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Linux IS fun! | Linux Format

    Some people have gained the impression that Linux might not be fun. How did that happen? So this issue we’re putting the fun back into Lin(f)u(n)x! We’re not sure that’s going to catch on…

    This issue we’re going to look at Plex. While no longer open source, it’s always treated Linux as a first-class citizen and delivers a super-slick media streaming experience across networks, devices and all media. You can use it for free and if you get on with it there are membership levels that unlock extra features and app access. It’s certainly a system that works for Plex.

  • Enabling A Firewall Is Easy In Linux - YouTube

    I am going to show you how to install and enable the Uncomplicated Firewall (ufw) and how to add and delete rules for it. Ufw is a very easy-to-use command line utility, and for those that want a graphical tool, gufw is available as well.

  • Destination Linux 196: Going Sub-Atomic With Quantum Computing - Destination Linux

    This week We’re going to take a look at what’s new for KDE’s latest Plasma 5.20 release! We’re going visit the Quantum Realm to discuss Quantum Computing and an article Red Hat released about the subject including what sysadmins will need to do to manage in this new realm without an Ant Man suit. In our gaming section, we’re going to be howling at the moon because this week we’ll be checking out Werewolf: The Apocalypse — Heart of the Forest. Later in the show, we’ll give you our popular tips/tricks and software picks. Plus so much more, on this week’s episode of Destination Linux.

  • mintCast 346 – It’s Not You, It’s Me – mintCast

    First up, in our Wanderings, Leo makes web apps, Moss sends a Telegram, Joe gets an upgrade, Josh fights with a mic, and Bo gets a gnome.

Alpine 3.12.1 released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The Alpine Linux project is pleased to announce the immediate availability of version 3.12.1 of its Alpine Linux operating system.

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More in Tux Machines

Wine 5.20 Released

The Wine development release 5.20 is now available.

What's new in this release (see below for details):
  - More work on the DSS cryptographic provider.
  - A number of fixes for windowless RichEdit.
  - Support for FLS callbacks.
  - Window resizing in the new console host.
  - Various bug fixes.

The source is available from the following locations:

  https://dl.winehq.org/wine/source/5.x/wine-5.20.tar.xz
  http://mirrors.ibiblio.org/wine/source/5.x/wine-5.20.tar.xz

Binary packages for various distributions will be available from:

  https://www.winehq.org/download

You will find documentation on https://www.winehq.org/documentation

You can also get the current source directly from the git
repository. Check https://www.winehq.org/git for details.

Wine is available thanks to the work of many people. See the file
AUTHORS in the distribution for the complete list.
Read more Also: Wine 5.20 Released With Various Improvements For Running Windows Software On Linux

PostmarketOS update brings HDMI support for the PinePhone and PineTab

When the PinePhone postmarketOS Community Edition smartphone began shipping to customers in September it came with a version of the operating system with one important feature missing: HDMI output. So when my phone arrived a few weeks ago I was able to spend some time familiarizing myself with the operating system and I could plug in the included Convergence Dock to use USB accessories including a keyboard, mouse, and storage. But I wasn’t able to connect an external display. Now I can. Read more

today's howtos

  • How To Install Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla

    This tutorial explains Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla computer installation. You will prepare at least two disk partitions, finishing it all in about twenty minutes, and enjoy! Let's start right now.

  • How to install Ubuntu 20.10 - YouTube

    In this video, I am going to show how to install Ubuntu 20.10.

  • How To Install Webmin on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS - idroot

    In this tutorial we will show you how to install Webmin on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, as well as some extra required packages by Webmin control panel

  • Running Ironic Standalone on RHEL | Adam Young’s Web Log

    This is only going to work if you have access to the OpenStack code. If you are not an OpenStack customer, you are going to need an evaluation entitlement. That is beyond the scope of this article.

  • Introduction to Ironic

    The sheer number of projects and problem domains covered by OpenStack was overwhelming. I never learned several of the other projects under the big tent. One project that is getting relevant to my day job is Ironic, the bare metal provisioning service. Here are my notes from spelunking the code.

  • Adding Nodes to Ironic

    TheJulia was kind enough to update the docs for Ironic to show me how to include IPMI information when creating nodes.

  • Secure NTP with NTS

    Many computers use the Network Time Protocol (NTP) to synchronize their system clocks over the internet. NTP is one of the few unsecured internet protocols still in common use. An attacker that can observe network traffic between a client and server can feed the client with bogus data and, depending on the client’s implementation and configuration, force it to set its system clock to any time and date. Some programs and services might not work if the client’s system clock is not accurate. For example, a web browser will not work correctly if the web servers’ certificates appear to be expired according to the client’s system clock. Use Network Time Security (NTS) to secure NTP. Fedora 331 is the first Fedora release to support NTS. NTS is a new authentication mechanism for NTP. It enables clients to verify that the packets they receive from the server have not been modified while in transit. The only thing an attacker can do when NTS is enabled is drop or delay packets. See RFC8915 for further details about NTS. NTP can be secured well with symmetric keys. Unfortunately, the server has to have a different key for each client and the keys have to be securely distributed. That might be practical with a private server on a local network, but it does not scale to a public server with millions of clients. NTS includes a Key Establishment (NTS-KE) protocol that automatically creates the encryption keys used between the server and its clients. It uses Transport Layer Security (TLS) on TCP port 4460. It is designed to scale to very large numbers of clients with a minimal impact on accuracy. The server does not need to keep any client-specific state. It provides clients with cookies, which are encrypted and contain the keys needed to authenticate the NTP packets. Privacy is one of the goals of NTS. The client gets a new cookie with each server response, so it doesn’t have to reuse cookies. This prevents passive observers from tracking clients migrating between networks.

  • Comfortable Motion: Absolutely Cursed Vim Scrolling - YouTube

    Have you ever felt like Vim was too useful and thought hey let's change that, well that's what this dev thought and now we have a plugin called comfortable motion that's adds physics based scrolling into vim, what's physics based scrolling you ask. Well it's scrolling that occurs based on how long you hold down the scroll key.

  • Running Cassandra on Fedora 32 | Adam Young’s Web Log

    This is not a tutorial. These are my running notes from getting Cassandra to run on Fedora 32. The debugging steps are interesting in their own right. I’ll provide a summary at the end for any sane enough not to read through the rest.

  • Recovering Audio off an Old Tape Using Audacity | Adam Young’s Web Log

    One of my fiorends wrote a bunch of music back in high school. The only remainig recordings are on a casette tape that he produced. Time has not been kind to the recordings, but they are audible…barely. He has a device that produces MP3s from the tape. My job has been to try and get them so that we can understand them well enough to recover the original songs. I have the combined recording on a single MP3. I’ve gone through and noted the times where each song starts and stops. I am going to go through the steps I’ve been using to go from that single long MP3 to an individual recording.

  • Role of Training and Certification at the Linux Foundation

    Open source allows anyone to dip their toes in the code, read up on the documentation, and learn everything on their own. That’s how most of us did it, but that’s just the first step. Those who want to have successful careers in building, maintaining, and managing IT infrastructures of companies need more structured hands-on learning with real-life experience. That’s where Linux Foundation’s Training and Certification unit enters the picture. It helps not only greenhorn developers but also members of the ecosystem who seek highly trained and certified engineers to manage their infrastructure. Swapnil Bhartiya sat down with Clyde Seepersad, SVP and GM of Training and Certification at the Linux Foundation, to learn more about the Foundation’s efforts to create a generation of qualified professionals.

  • Hetzner build machine

    This is part of a series of posts on compiling a custom version of Qt5 in order to develop for both amd64 and a Raspberry Pi. Building Qt5 takes a long time. The build server I was using had CPUs and RAM, but was very slow on I/O. I was very frustrated by that, and I started evaluating alternatives. I ended up setting up scripts to automatically provision a throwaway cloud server at Hetzner.

Leftovers: Debian, Graphics and Audiocasts

  • Integer Scaling To Come With Linux 5.11 For Intel Graphics Driver - Phoronix

    Going back more than a year there have been Intel "i915" kernel graphics driver patches implementing integer mode scaling support while finally for Linux 5.11 in early 2021 the support will have landed. Intel added integer mode scaling to their Windows graphics driver back in 2019 to provide better clarity when upscaling games (particularly pixel art type content) and other software. The Linux patches materialized in September 2019 for nearest-neighbor integer mode scaling and then seemingly forgotten about. The capability works with Gen11 / Ice Lake and newer.

  • Linux Support for Variable Refresh Rates On Gen12+ Intel GPUs Is On The Way - LinuxReviews

    Intel developer Manasi Navare has submitted a series of patches for the Linux kernel that brings support for variable refresh rates on Intel's latest graphics chips to the Linux kernels i915 driver. The feature is only enabled on Tiger Lake, Sapphire Rapids and newer Intel graphics chips. [...] You do not need a special "Freesync" monitor to use adaptive vertical synchronization, Freesync is just a marketing term used by AMD. The DisplayPort specification has included variable refresh rate (VRR) as an option feature since DP 1.4 and there are many monitors with support for it that are not marketed as "Freesync" or "gaming" monitors. Monitors that are marketed as "Freesync" support the standard DisplayPort VRR protocol so you don't need to use a AMD graphics card to get the benefits of a Freesync monitor. You will soon be able to use one of the very latest Intel CPU's with integrated graphics or one of Intel's upcoming dedicated graphics cards with Freesync monitors on Linux.

  • Salsa updated to GitLab 13.5

    Today, GitLab released the version 13.5 with several new features. Also Salsa got some changes applied to it. [...] It's been way over two years since we started to use Google Compute Engine (GCE) for Salsa. Since then, all the jobs running on the shared runners run within a n1-standard-1 instance, providing a fresh set of one vCPU and 3.75GB of RAM for each and every build. GCE supports several new instance types, featuring better and faster CPUs, including current AMD EPICs. However, as it turns out, GCE does not support any single vCPU instances for any of those types. So jobs in the future will use n2d-standard-2 for the time being, provinding two vCPUs and 8GB of RAM..

  • Social Media Regulation and Journalism

    Doc Searls, Katherine Druckman, and Petros Koutoupis talk social media regulation and its relationship to journalism and the threat to Section 230.

  • Automation Entropy Factor | Self-Hosted 30

    Chris gets left out in the cold after a Home Assistant glitch, and Alex puts a big batch of USB hard drives to the test Plus a great pick for you pack rats, feedback, and more.

  • Tribalism and Toxicity in the Linux Community - YouTube

    Gatekeeping, tribalism and toxicity in the Linux community. We're tired of it and it's time to silence it. But WHY does it happen, and HOW do we DEAL with it?