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Endless OS May Be the Best Linux Version for New Computer Users

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Linux appeals to a certain kind of computer user: if you like computers enough to read about or tinker with them in your free time, then there’s a good chance you’ll find something to like about Linux. Otherwise, you will probably consider it too much work to bother.

Endless Computer’s Endless OS aims to provide a complete desktop experience that’s versatile enough to serve families. Is this the ideal way to introduce newcomers to Linux?

Read more

Survey: Console Based Linux File Managers

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The term ‘file management functions’ refers to the functions used to manage files, such as creating, deleting, opening, closing, reading from, and writing to files.

In the field of system administration, Linux has bags of graphical file managers. However, some users prefer managing files from the shell, finding it the quickest way to navigate the file system and perform file operations. This is, in part, because console based file managers are more keyboard friendly, enabling users to perform file operations without using a mouse, and make it quicker to navigate the filesystem and issue commands in the console at the same time.

A console application is computer software which can be used with a text-only computer interface, the command line interface, or a text-based interface included within a graphical user interface operating system, such as a terminal emulator. Whereas a graphical user interface application generally involves using the mouse and keyboard (or touch control), with a console application the primary (and often only) input method is the keyboard. Many console applications are command line tools, but there is a wealth of software that has a text-based user interface making use of ncurses, a library which allow programmers to write text-based user interfaces.

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What is the relationship between FSF and FSFE?

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GNU

Ever since I started blogging about my role in FSFE as Fellowship representative, I've been receiving communications and queries from various people, both in public and in private, about the relationship between FSF and FSFE. I've written this post to try and document my own experiences of the issue, maybe some people will find this helpful. These comments have also been shared on the LibrePlanet mailing list for discussion (subscribe here)

Being the elected Fellowship representative means I am both a member of FSFE e.V. and also possess a mandate to look out for the interests of the community of volunteers and donors (they are not members of FSFE e.V). In both capacities, I feel uncomfortable about the current situation due to the confusion it creates in the community and the risk that volunteers or donors may be confused.

The FSF has a well known name associated with a distinctive philosophy. Whether people agree with that philosophy or not, they usually know what FSF believes in. That is the power of a brand.

When people see the name FSFE, they often believe it is a subsidiary or group working within the FSF. The way that brands work, people associate the philosophy with the name, just as somebody buying a Ferrari in Berlin expects it to do the same things that a Ferrari does in Boston.

To give an example, when I refer to "our president" in any conversation, people not knowledgeable about the politics believe I am referring to RMS. More specifically, if I say to somebody "would you like me to see if our president can speak at your event?", some people think it is a reference to RMS. In fact, FSFE was set up as a completely independent organization with distinct membership and management and therefore a different president. When I try to explain this to people, they sometimes lose interest and the conversation can go cold very quickly.

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What's happening this International Day Against DRM?

Filed under
GNU

We couldn't be more excited about what's happening today on the Web and around the world. Organizations, nonprofits, and companies have stepped up to take action, sharing their work to make the world DRM-free.

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The History of Various Linux Distros

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Linux has been around for almost 30 years. Yes, it’s that old, and it did make history. If you are interested in the history of some of the major Linux distros, here it is in a nutshell – the history of various Linux distros, like Ubuntu, Fedora, REHL, Linux Mint, Slackware, etc. The reasons for their creation and their philosophy will be briefly discussed.

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International Day Against DRM takes action for a Day Without DRM on September 18th

Filed under
GNU

DRM is the practice of imposing technological restrictions that control what users can do with digital media. DRM creates a damaged good: it prevents you from doing what would be possible without it. This concentrates control over production and distribution of media, giving DRM peddlers the power to carry out massive digital book-burnings and conduct large-scale surveillance over people's media viewing habits.

Organized by the Defective by Design team, IDAD has occurred annually since 2006. Each year, participants take action through protests, rallies, and the sharing of DRM-free media and materials. Participating nonprofits, activist groups, and companies from around the world include the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Open Rights Group, Public Knowledge, the Document Foundation, and others (for a complete list, see: https://dayagainstdrm.org). These groups will share the message by writing about why DRM is harmful, organizing events, and offering discounts on DRM-free media.

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Linux Accessibility For The Visually Impaired – For The Record

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GNU
Linux
Interviews

Linux Accessibility For The Visually Impaired. I received a comment from Milton asking me about text to speech options in Linux. He also wanted to know what I recommended for audio dictation under Linux. The first option is indeed, using FoSS awesomeness. However the later relies on Google’s Web Speech API. Also, here is that article on controlling your mouse cursor with your webcam and no hands.

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GNU/Linux Desktop Themes

Filed under
GNU
Linux
GNOME
  • Plane Theme and Icons Gives Your Desktop An Appearance Boost

    Plane Theme and Icons Gives Your Desktop An Appearance Boost
    Another theme pack with icons for your Linux Desktop. Plane theme is designed to make desktop more elegant and simple, it goes very well along with its own icon pack. Now a days many themes are under development for Gnome and Plane is one of them, it is constantly updating since 2017, fixing and making theme look better. It has some parts from Arc and Adwaita themes, also some other themes inspired author to make Plane more eye catching.
    There are two versions in this theme: light version and dark version which gives comfort to your eyes. This pack includes Gnome shell themes as well, which lets you match your Gnome shell with your Gtk theme.
    Primarily, this pack targets Gnome Shell desktop but can be used on other desktops as well such as: Cinnamon, Xfce, Mate etc. Icons are designed to use with this theme pack but if you want then you can use them with any theme of your choice. Themes are available for Ubuntu 18.10/18.04 and Linux Mint 19 via our PPA. Icons available for Ubuntu 18.10/18.04/16.04/14.04/Linux Mint 19/18/17. If you find any kind of bug or problem with this theme pack then report it to author and it will get fixed in the next update.

  • Shadow Icons Looks Great With All Themes, Install in Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    Shadow icon theme is a new comer for Linux desktop, it looks beautiful with all kind of themes. It is meant to be modern clean and customizable, the primary color of this set most likely bluish and many apps icons are in round shape. So basically this theme is mixture of round and normal (square) shape icons, lets see where this theme will head in the future, it should choose shape what users asks. As creator mentioned this icon theme is his first so please bare any bugs or missing icons. You can report bugs or suggest new icons to include in this set via this link. You can use Unity Tweak Tool, Gnome-tweak-tool to change themes/icons.

Linux vs Mac: 7 Reasons Why Linux is a Better Choice than Mac

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Mac

If you’re already using a Mac or planning to get one, we recommend you to thoroughly analyze the reasons to decide whether you need to switch/keep using Linux or continue using Mac.

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NetworkManager 1.14 Officially Released With A Lot Of Networking Goodies

Filed under
GNU
Linux
GNOME

Following the release candidate last week, NetworkManager 1.14 is now officially available as the latest feature release to this widely-used Linux networking software component.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Opus 1.3 Codec Library Nears, New Tools Release
    Back in June was the first release candidate of Opus 1.3 (libopus v1.3) with this open-source audio codec allowing to use SILK down to bitrates of about 5kb/s, wideband encoding down to 9kb/s, improved security, improved Ambisonics support, and much more. Libopus 1.3 RC2 is now available along with some tooling updates. Libopus 1.3 RC2 was released on Tuesday to fix issues with bandwidth detection, enable Ambisonics support by default, and enables security hardening by default.
  • Akademy 2018
    I had the awesome opportunity to attend Akademy in Vienna this year. First off, a big thank you to the organising team for pulling off this years Akademy without a hitch. This Akademy was a bit more special, since it was decided to switch up the format, which in my opinion worked quite well. There were training’s that ran alongside the talk’s and BoF’s, which I think was a great idea. I signed up to the Public Speaking Training and the Non Violent Communication training, which I think were run exceptionally. I hope that these training sessions are run again next Akademy because I found them exceptionally valuable.
  • NetworkManager Merges An Initrd Generator For Early Boot Handling
    Days following the NetworkManager 1.14 release, feature activity on the next release is progressing and the newest addition is nm-initrd-generator. The NetworkManager Initrd Generator is used to generate an early-boot NetworkManager configuration. This new utility scans the command line for supported options and from there generates a network configuration and the necessary configuration files to handle an early instance of NetworkManager that runs from the initial ramdisk during the system's early boot stage.
  • Mageia at fête de l’humanité 2018
    The booths were in a different place from previous years, and we had a lot more visitors. We gave out all the flyers we brought by Saturday evening – there was only one left for Sunday – so we gave out Mageia stickers instead. We did not sell any T-shirts, but we sold two USB sticks. Many people asked for general information; I spoke so much that I lost my voice! We had strong interest, coming from people already using a Linux distribution as well as from people wishing to turn to free software.
  • Troubleshooting FDB table wrapping in Open vSwitch
    When most people deploy an Open vSwitch configuration for virtual networking using the NORMAL rule, that is, using L2 learning, they do not think about configuring the size of the Forwarding DataBase (FDB).
  • Test Day: Fedora Silverblue
    Fedora Silverblue is a new variant of Fedora Workstation with rpm-ostree at its core to provide fully atomic upgrades. Furthermore, Fedora Silverblue is immutable and upgrades as a whole, providing easy rollbacks from updates if something goes wrong. Fedora Silverblue is great for developers using Fedora with good support for container-focused workflows. Additionally, Fedora Silverblue delivers desktop applications as Flatpaks. This provides better isolation/sandboxing of applications, and streamlines updating applications — Flatpaks can be safely updated without reboot.
  • Understand Fedora memory usage with top
    Have you used the top utility in a terminal to see memory usage on your Fedora system? If so, you might be surprised to see some of the numbers there. It might look like a lot more memory is consumed than your system has available. This article will explain a little more about memory usage, and how to read these numbers. [...] Your system has another facility it uses to store information, which is swap. Typically this is an area of slower storage (like a hard disk). If the physical memory on the system fills up as needs increase, the OS looks for portions of memory that haven’t been needed in a while. It writes them out to the swap area, where they sit until needed later. Therefore, prolonged, high swap usage usually means a system is suffering from too little memory for its demands. Sometimes an errant application may be at fault. Or, if you see this often on your system, consider upgrading your machine’s memory, or restricting what you run.
  • Global Open-Source Learning Management Systems Software Market Size, Status and Forecast 2022
  • The Commons Clause vs. Open Source controversy, explained [iophk: "if it has the "Commons Clause" in it then it does not qualify as Open Source"]

    So, what is Commons Clause and why isn’t it the same thing as open source?

Endless OS May Be the Best Linux Version for New Computer Users

Linux appeals to a certain kind of computer user: if you like computers enough to read about or tinker with them in your free time, then there’s a good chance you’ll find something to like about Linux. Otherwise, you will probably consider it too much work to bother. Endless Computer’s Endless OS aims to provide a complete desktop experience that’s versatile enough to serve families. Is this the ideal way to introduce newcomers to Linux? Read more

today's howtos

Andrew Crouthamel: How I Got Involved in KDE

Since this blog is starting after the beginning of my contributions to KDE, the first few regular posts will be explaining my prior contributions, before moving into the present. Read more