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GNU

Switching to Linux? 4 Operating Systems That Feel Like Home

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GNU
Linux

Switching to Linux opens the door to new tools and techniques to make your computing experience easier. But there is a learning curve, and depending on your choice of Linux operating system even navigating your desktop may be a challenge. Here’s how to make your new journey a little more familiar.

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Microsoft Hates Linux: Got Caught, Pretended Just an Accident

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Detailed change log for deepin 15.4 RC

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GNU
Linux

deepin is a Linux distribution devoted to providing beautiful, easy to use, safe and reliable system for global users.

After public test of deepin 15.4 Beta, we have received a lot of suggestions and feedback, we adopted part of them and fixed a lot of problems.

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Microsoft Loves Microsoft

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • Microsoft’s OneDrive performance on Linux is causing quite a storm

    Since Microsoft has been under the stewardship of Satya Nadella, the software giant has been embracing Linux in various different ways – ‘new Microsoft, new attitude’, as we observed a year ago – but not when it comes to OneDrive, it would seem.

    As the Register reports, there are a good number of users complaining about the poor performance of the OneDrive web app on their Linux machines (or other non-Windows platforms like Chromebooks).

    The interesting point here is that when using a Windows PC on the exact same connection with the OneDrive app, everything runs smooth and fast.

  • Microsoft loves Linux so much, its OneDrive web app runs like a dog on Windows OS rivals

    Ever since Satya Nadella took over the reins at Microsoft, the Windows giant has been talking up how much it loves Linux – but it appears this hasn't trickled down to its OneDrive team.

    Plenty of Linux users are up in arms about the performance of the OneDrive web app. They say that when accessing Microsoft's cloudy storage system in a browser on a non-Windows system – such as on Linux or ChromeOS – the service grinds to a barely usable crawl. But when they use a Windows machine on the same internet connection, speedy access resumes.

    Crucially, when they change their browser's user-agent string – a snippet of text the browser sends to websites describing itself – to Internet Explorer or Edge, magically their OneDrive access speeds up to normal on their non-Windows PCs.

GNU/Linux Games and Wine

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GNU
Linux
Gaming

Microsoft vs GNU/Linux

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Announcing Rockstor 3.9.0

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GNU
Linux

We’ve just wrapped up a fun release cycle, and it’s my pleasure to announce Rockstor 3.9.0. Our community has been really active and we’ve prioritized nicely to improve on a few different areas. 5 contributors have come together for this release and besides working on new features and bug fixes, we made significant improvements to code quality. @phillxnet has made a big enhancement to the disk management subsystem. I’ve made large code quality improvement to backend Python stack. @MFlyer collaborated with me on that and took upon himself to do the same for all of Javascript stack. He made several ninja style contributions and helped fix many bugs. I’d say this is a nice release with some new stuff and a bunch of useful maintenance updates. Thanks to everyone that made this happen!

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Linux on Servers

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GNU
Linux
Server
OSS
  • DevOps still very much a work in progress, survey suggests

    That's the key takeaway from a recent survey of 2,045 IT managers and professionals, released by Quali, an IT automation solutions provider. While most people in enterprises would say at this point that they have DevOps underway in some shape or form, achieving agility is another story.

  • IBM chases Google, Microsoft with Kubernetes in the cloud

    It's only a matter of time before every major cloud vendor offers a version of Kubernetes as a service. Now it’s IBM’s turn.

  • In The Virtualization Space, Containers Are Making A Move

    Wow has it been a whirlwind over the last ten years in the virtualization space. Where once Xen and then KVM sat on the pedestal, the baton has been passed to the projects revolved around containers. Names like Docker, Kubernetes and Mesos are most often mentioned. As is generally the case in the FLOSS arena, evolution is a constant. Therefore, if one is in the DevOps arena, it is time to familiarize yourself with containers if you have not already done so.

  • The DOE and NSA Construct Doomsday Scenario for American HPC

    One last point. The Chinese economy continues to expand faster than that of the US, and, depending on who you talk to, will reach the size of the US sometime between 2018 and 2028. Such an economy would be expected to field an HPC capability on par with that of the US. Furthermore, China and the US should both be able to maintain an indigenous and self-sustaining HPC capability for their own use, and it’s unreasonable to think either could prevent the other from doing so. In such a world, the US may no longer enjoy technological supremacy, but it can surely have the wherewithal to control its own future in HPC.

  • [Older] Getting Down To Bare Metal On The Cloud

    When you think of the public cloud, the tendency is to focus on the big ones, like Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure, or Google Cloud Platform. They’re massive, dominating the public cloud skyline with huge datacenters filled with thousands of highly virtualized servers, not to mention virtualized storage and networking. Capacity is divvied up among corporate customers that are increasingly looking to run and store their workloads on someone else’s infrastructure, hardware that they don’t have to set up, deploy, manage or maintain themselves.

  • Avoid complex infrastructure when building simple things

    For local development, go crazy. For real production use.. I think you should avoid this until you’re the size of business that someone else will do this for you. If this seems controversial do the math: include backing it up, patching it, keeping it highly available, the time spent not working on your differentiating features etc. There are plenty of datastore services available that will do all this for you and let you focus your limited time on your app, and they’re really very cheap when you consider the actual cost of running a production database. Write your app so that the cost of moving to your own database later if you need to is unlikely to be high. Managing a simple web app instead of managing a web app, a production database, a message queue etc is a big win.

  • DebConf17 welcomes its first eighteen sponsors!

    DebConf17 will take place in Montreal, Canada in August 2017. We are working hard to provide fuel for hearts and minds, to make this conference once again a fertile soil for the Debian Project flourishing. Please join us and support this landmark in the Free Software calendar.

  • [OT] Smartphone App: Retro Recorder and Call Recorder for your Tizen mobile

antiX 17 Linux Alpha 2 ISO Images Are Based on Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch"

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GNU
Linux
Debian

The developers of the Debian-based antiX Linux operating system released today new Alpha builds of the upcoming antiX 17 series, the first public images based of Debian Stretch.

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More in Tux Machines

Games and CrossOver

Red Hat and Fedora

Android Leftovers

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • CoreOS Tectonic Now Installs Kubernetes on OpenStack
    CoreOS and OpenStack have a somewhat intertwined history, which is why it's somewhat surprising it took until today for CoreOS's Tectonic Kubernetes distribution to provide an installer that targets OpenStack cloud deployments.
  • Docker and Core OS plan to donate their container technologies to CNCF
    Containers have become a critical component of modern cloud, and Docker Inc. controls the heart of containers, the container runtime. There has been a growing demand that this critical piece of technology should be under control of a neutral, third party so that the community can invest in it freely.
  • How Blockchain Is Helping China Go Greener
    Blockchain has near-universal applicability as a distributed transaction platform for securely authenticating exchanges of data, goods, and services. IBM and the Beijing-based Energy-Blockchain Labs are even using it to help reduce carbon emissions in air-polluted China.
  • An efficient approach to continuous documentation
  • The peril in counting source lines on an OSS project
    There seems to be a phase that OSS projects go through where as they mature and gain traction. As they do it becomes increasingly important for vendors to point to their contributions to credibly say they are the ‘xyz’ company. Heptio is one such vendor operating in the OSS space, and this isn’t lost on us. :) It helps during a sales cycle to be able to say “we are the a big contributor to this project, look at the percentage of code and PRs we submitted”. While transparency is important as is recognizing the contributions that key vendors, focus on a single metric in isolation (and LoC in particular) creates a perverse incentive structure. Taken to its extreme it becomes detrimental to project health.
  • An Open Source Unicycle Motor
    And something to ponder. The company that sells this electric unicycle could choose to use a motor with open firmware or one with closed firmware. To many consumers, that difference might not be so significant. To this consumer, though, that’s a vital difference. To me, I fully own the product I bought when the firmware is open. I explain to others that they ought to choose that level of full ownership whenever they get a chance. And if they join a local makerspace, they will likely meet others with similar values. If you don’t yet have a makerspace in your community, inquire around to see if anyone is in the process of forming one. Then find ways to offer them support. That’s how we do things in the FOSS community.
  • The A/V guy’s take on PyCon Pune
    “This is crazy!”, that was my reaction at some point in PyCon Pune. This is one of my first conference where I participated in a lot of things starting from the website to audio/video and of course being the speaker. I saw a lot of aspects of how a conference works and where what can go wrong. I met some amazing people, people who impacted my life , people who I will never forget. I received so much of love and affection that I can never express in words. So before writing anything else I want to thank each and everyone of you , “Thank you!”.
  • Azure Service Fabric takes first tentative steps toward open source [Ed: Microsoft Peter is openwashing a patent trap with back doors]
  • Simulate the Internet with Flashback, a New WebDev Test Tool from LinkedIn
  • Mashape Raises $18M for API Gateway Tech
    Casado sees Mashape's Kong API gateway in particular as being a particularly well positioned technology. Kong is an open-source API gateway and microservice management technology.
  • PrismTech to Demonstrate Open Source FACE 2.1 Transport Services Segment (TSS) Reference Implementation at Air Force FACE Technical Interchange Meeting
    PrismTech’s TSS reference implementation is being made available under GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL) v3 open source license terms.
  • How Open-Source Robotics Hardware Is Accelerating Research and Innovation

    The latest issue of the IEEE Robotics & Automation Magazine features a special report on open-source robotics hardware and its impact in the field.