Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

GNU

How ProPublica Illinois Uses GNU Make to Load 1.4GB of Data Every Day

Filed under
GNU
Misc

I avoided using GNU Make in my data journalism work for a long time, partly because the documentation was so obtuse that I couldn’t see how Make, one of many extract-transform-load (ETL) processes, could help my day-to-day data reporting. But this year, to build The Money Game, I needed to load 1.4GB of Illinois political contribution and spending data every day, and the ETL process was taking hours, so I gave Make another chance.

Now the same process takes less than 30 minutes.

Here’s how it all works, but if you want to skip directly to the code, we’ve open-sourced it here.

[...]

GNU Make is well-suited to this task. Make’s model is built around describing the output files your ETL process should produce and the operations required to go from a set of original source files to a set of output files.

As with any ETL process, the goal is to preserve your original data, keep operations atomic and provide a simple and repeatable process that can be run over and over.

Read more

Watch Desktop Linux Apps (like GIMP) Running on Chrome OS [Video]

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

Linux fans enthusiastic about Google’s effort to bring desktop Linux apps on Chrome OS owe to themselves to watch the following video.

In it, technology YouTuber Lon Seidman demos the current state of the Crostini project (‘Crostini’ is the codename for the “run desktop and CLI Linux apps on Chrome OS” feature we keep gushing about) on both an Intel Chromebox and an ARM-based Chromebook.

This latter demo, of ARM support, is of particular interest.

I had (wrongly, it turns out) assumed Google would restrict Crostini to running on its higher-end Chromebooks, like the pricey Google Pixelbook and the ‘spensive Samsung Chromebook Plus.

Read more

Interview with Andrea Buso

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux
Interviews

In 2000, my brother, a computer programmer, made me try OpenSuse. I used Gimp, and I felt good because I could draw what I wanted and how I wanted. Since then, I have abandoned Windows for Linux and I have discovered a series of wonderful programs which allow me to work professionally, giving me the advantage of digital.

Read more

UserLAnd, a Turnkey Linux in Your Pocket

Filed under
GNU
Linux

UserLAnd offers a quick and easy way to run an entire Linux distribution, or even just a Linux application or game, from your pocket. It installs as an Android app and is available for download from the Android Google Play Store. The best part is that because it operates from a typical chroot environment, you don't need to root your device.

I was fortunate enough to have a chance to spin up one of the early beta builds of UserLAnd. This beta build was limited only to SSH and VNC local connections from my Android mobile device, but it was more than enough to establish a sound sense of how things are and where things will progress.

To handle the SSH connection, UserLAnd leverages ConnectBot while using bVNC for anything graphical. The beta build I used supported only TWM. Future updates will add additional window managers and a desktop environment. Both ConnectBot and bVNC are installed when you create and launch your session (see below).

Immediately after installation and upon launching the application, you are greeted with a clean environment—that is, no root filesystems and no sessions defined.

Read more

GNU: GIMP, GCC and RISC-V

Filed under
GNU
  • GIMP 2.10.4 Moves To Asynchronous Font Loading, Horizon Straightening

    GIMP 2.10.4 was quietly released earlier this week as the latest stable release in the GIMP 2.10 series.

    While GIMP 2.10.4 is primarily comprised of bug fixes, there are also a few new features. The feature work that made it into this release includes simple horizon straightening, asynchronous font loading, fonts tagging, dashboard updates, Adobe PSD loader improvements, and GEGL/babl improvements.

  • RISC-V: Initial riscv linux Ada port

    I was asked about Ada support, so I tried cross building a native RISC-V Linux Ada compiler, and it turned out to be possible with a little bit of work.  I just started with the MIPS support, and then fixed everything that was obviously wrong: endianness, error numbers, signal numbers, struct_sigaction offsets, etc.

    The result is good enough to bootstrap natively and seems to give reasonable native testsuite results for a first attempt.  The machine I'm running on has broken icache flushing, so trampolines won't work, and I suspect that is causing a lot of the testsuite failures.  Here are the Ada testsuite results I'm getting at the moment.

  • Ada Language Support For RISC-V With Latest GCC Patches

    While the GCC compiler merged its RISC-V port last year, among its limitations have been not supporting the Ada compiler. That's now changing thanks to new patches posted today.

GNU: Guix and GNU C Library

Filed under
GNU
  • GNU Guix/GuixSD 0.15 Released, Closing In On v1.0

    GNU Guix 0.15 is out today as the latest feature update to this transactional package manager and is joined by an updated Guix System Distribution (GuixSD) release too as the GNU Linux-libre distribution built around it.

    The Guix 0.15 package manager update overhauls/improvements many common sub-commands, introduces some new user options, and more. The Guix Daemon also now supports ARMv7 builds from an AArch64 host, ships with an SELinux policy, and has various other updates.

  • GNU Guix and GuixSD 0.15.0 released

    We are pleased to announce the new release of GNU Guix and GuixSD, version 0.15.0! This release brings us close to what we wanted to have for 1.0, so it’s probably one of the last zero-dot-something releases.

    The release comes with GuixSD ISO-9660 installation images, a virtual machine image of GuixSD, and with tarballs to install the package manager on top of your GNU/Linux distro, either from source or from binaries.GNU Guix and GuixSD 0.15.0 released

  • Glibc 2.28 Adds Unicode 11.0 Support, RenameAt2

    In addition to working on statx() for glibc, landing in the GNU C Library this week was Unicode 11.0 support along with a renameat2() function.

    First up, Unicode 11.0 is now supported by Glibc. Unicode 11.0 was released last month with new emojis (66 new ones in total), 684 new code points, and more.

Anarchy Linux – A User-Friendly Alternative to Arch Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Anarchy Linux, compared to other Linux distributions like Manjaro and Antergos because it is actually NOT a Linux distribution.

Anarchy Linux is a free and open source package containing a set of automated scripts designed to facilitate the easier installation and configuration setup of Arch Linux.

To define Anarchy Linux in the simplest of terms, it’s an Arch Linux wrapper and it offers users a close replica of an Arch Linux experience since that is what it runs under the hood.

Read more

D-Link and the GPL

Filed under
GNU
Legal

It tells me to go to D-Link’s page for GPL licensed software to get the source code. It also lets me write a request the source code on physical media for a nominal fee for the media and handling. Something I naturally did (being an engineer on vacation).

While waiting for a reply, let’s have a look at the online version. When entering the URL provided you have to click through an agreement that I understand what GPL and LGPL means and that the files distributed comes with no warranties (they spend more words saying this – read it if you want the details). Clicking “I Agree” I get a popup (back to the 90’s) asking me to register my product to enjoy all the benefits of doing so. At the same time the main window continues to a list of all D-Link products containing (L)GPL software – very nice.

Read more

GIMP 2.10.4 Released

Filed under
GNU

The latest update of GIMP’s new stable series delivers bugfixes, simple horizon straightening, async fonts loading, fonts tagging, and more new features.

Read more

Dell's GNU/Linux Offerings

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Precision Developer Editions 7530/7730 now online — Welcome the power pair

    These new thinner, lighter, premium-built Precision mobile workstations come preloaded with Ubuntu and have been RHEL certified. The 7530 and 7730 feature the latest Intel Core and Xeon processors, blazing-fast memory and professional graphics.

    Of particular note is the increased core count and memory. In fact the maximum memory has doubled to 128GB which helps with cloud developer local workloads. In the case of the 7730, it supports up to 8TB of PCIe NVME storage, the most PCIe storage on the market today. The 7730 is also the first AI/ML ready mobile workstation available.

  • Dell Launches World's Most Powerful 15" and 17" Laptops Powered by Ubuntu Linux

    The Dell Precision 7530 and 7730 Mobile Workstation Developer Editions are now available to order from Dell's online store with the Ubuntu Linux operating system pre-installed.

    At the end of May 2018, Dell's Project Sputnik leader George Barton announced the availability of four new Dell Precision Mobile Workstations running the open-source and free Ubuntu Linux operating system.

    While at the moment of the announcement only the Dell Precision 3530 was available to order, those interested in purchasing a powerful laptop with Ubuntu pre-installed can now order two other models, namely the Dell Precision 7530 and Dell Precision 7730.

  • Dell Precision 7530 and 7730 laptops with Ubuntu pre-installed launched

    Dell Precision 7530 and 7730 Mobile Workstation Developer Editions are now open for order worldwide via the company’s online store. Both machines get powered by the open-source and free Ubuntu Linux operating system.

    Interested users who want a powerful machine with Ubuntu pre-installed, can now order the Dell Precision 7530 and Dell Precision 7730. Under the hood, both machines run the latest Intel Core or Xeon processors. The processor is further coupled with high-speed RAM, top-end NVidia or AMD graphics cards, and come pre-installed with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.5 operating system.

    Dell also plans to release professional drivers in the near future that’ll include features not offered by standard Inbox drivers of NVidia and AMD GPUs.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Pinguy OS Puts On a Happier GNOME 3 Face

Pinguy OS 18.04 is an Ubuntu-based distribution that offers a non-standard GNOME desktop environment intended to be friendlier for new Linux users. This distro is a solid Linux OS with a focus on simple and straightforward usability for the non-geek desktop user. If you do not like tinkering with settings or having numerous power-grabbing fancy screen animations, Pinguy OS could be a good choice. The GNOME desktop is the only user interface option, but Pinguy OS' developer, Antoni Norman, tweaked the desktop environment with some different software options not usually packaged with GNOME. Read more

You Can Now Install Android 8.1 Oreo on Your Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ Computer

Just two weeks after releasing the first build of his RaspAnd operating system based on Google's Android 8.1 Oreo mobile OS, Arne Exton today announced a new version with support for the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ computer. RaspAnd Oreo 8.1 Build 180717 is basically identical with RaspAnd Oreo 8.1 Build 180707 except for the fact that it now also supports the latest Raspberry Pi 3 single-board computer, the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+, which features a more powerful 1.4GHz 64-bit quad-core processor, dual-band Wi-Fi, Bluetooth LE 4.2, faster Ethernet, and Power-over-Ethernet support. Read more

Linux Foundation and Linux Development

  • Linux Foundation launches LF Energy open source platform
    Launched with support from Europe’s biggest transmission power systems provider and other organizations, LF Energy aims to streamline everything from system operator smart assistants to smart grid control software. It will serve as an umbrella organization that supports collaboration among vendors in the energy sector to advance information and communication technologies (ICT) that impact the energy balance and brings about economic value.
  • FPGA Device Feature List Framework Coming For Linux 4.19
    There's already a new framework coming to Linux 4.19 in the form of Google's Gasket while queued this week is now another new framework: the FPGA Device Feature List.
  • AMDGPU Firmware Updated From 18.20, Vega M Blobs Added
    The latest AMDGPU firmware/microcode binary images for Radeon GPUs have landed in the Linux-Firmware Git tree. Hitting linux-firmware.git minutes ago was the latest batch of AMDGPU firmware files from Bonaire and Hawaii up through Vega 10, Polaris, and Raven hardware. The updated firmware images are the same as what AMD recently shipped with the Radeon Software 18.20 hybrid driver package. No change-logs of what is different about these updated firmware images are currently available, but most of the time it's mostly routine and mundane fixes/updates.
  • Nvidia 390.77 Linux Graphics Driver Improves Compatibility with Latest Kernels
    Nvidia released a new version of its long-lived proprietary display driver for GNU/Linux, FreeBSD, and Solaris systems to add compatibility with recent Linux kernels and fix various bugs. While not a major release, the Nvidia 390.77 proprietary graphics driver brings better compatibility with the latest Linux kernels. However, Nvidia didn't mention if it's now possible to compile its proprietary display drivers with the upcoming Linux 4.18 kernel series or just with the recent Linux 4.17 point releases. In addition to improving compatibility with recent Linux kernels, the Nvidia 390.77 proprietary display driver for Linux-based operating systems addresses a random hang issue that could occur for some users when running Vulkan apps in full-screen mode and flipping was allowed.

today's howtos