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The Top 10 Linux Distros You Never Heard About

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD

As I have mentioned in previous articles, the open-source community is littered with many distributions – some of which you might never get to hear about if you’re not connected to an affiliated party or happen to come across a reference ad.

Plus, it’s a new year and we have been dropping Top 10 (and sometimes higher) titles since it began so you shouldn’t be surprised that we are here with another one.

In case you missed it, we recently published an article on The Top 10 Linux Desktop Distros of 2017, and I thought it will be nice if we checked out a couple of distros that might not have made it to the limelight in 2017 but are still significant and will probably be of great use to our readers.

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A Science Project: “Make The 486 Great Again!” – Modern Linux In An Ancient PC

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I asked the above quiz question during the Geekcamp tech conference in Nov 2017 during my emcee role. The theoretical answer as you can glean from the title of this post is the 486 which was first released in 1989. I determined that fact from this article where support for the 386 was dropped in Dec 2012.

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Release | Endless OS Version 3.3.8

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Fixes to the dual-boot OS selection menu. An error message introduced in Endless OS 3.3.7 is fixed, and hibernated Windows systems are detected in more cases.

Drag and drop for apps. We’ve added drag and drop functionality to the applications displayed in your desktop folders. You can now reorder apps, and add and remove apps from folders more easily.

Dual-boot installation from DVDs. The Endless Installer for Windows now works correctly when run from a DVD.

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8 unusual FOSS tools for agile teams

Filed under
GNU

You might be familiar with the expression: So many tools, so little time. In order to try to save you some time, I've outlined some of my favorite tools that help agile teams work better. If you are an agilist, chances are you're aware of similar tools, but I'm specifically narrowing down the list to tools that appeal to open source enthusiasts.

Caution! These tools are a little different than what you may be expecting. There are no project management apps—there is a great article on that already—so there are no checklists, no integrations with GitHub, just simple ways to organize your thoughts and promote team communication.

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With Linux, You Don't Get One Kernel of Truth... You Get Many

Filed under
GNU
Linux

As much as I love to poke at the inner workings of my computer, I'll admit that until recently, I didn't give much thought to which version of the Linux kernel my desktop system was running.

For most desktop users, this isn't all that odd. Compatibility of kernel modules is often critical for servers and production systems, but day-to-day desktop usage doesn't change much from update to update.

Two things motivated me to scrutinize the kernel version more closely: considerations for specific hardware; and a very scary bug recently identified in the Ubuntu distribution's latest release.

Having picked up a lot of useful tips in exploring different kernel versions, I decided to share what I've learned so far.

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Debian vs. Linux Mint: The Winner Is?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian
Ubuntu

Linux Mint is on track to becoming the most popular desktop distro available. This isn't to suggest that it's already happened, rather that it's on track to happen if Linux Mint continues to find its fans among Windows converts. By contrast, Debian has received almost no credit for this success whatsoever. Worse, neither does Ubuntu, which uses Debian as a base.

So are Linux Mint and Debian really all that different? After all, Linux Mint is based on Ubuntu, which is based on Debian. One might surmise that the these distros are more similar than different. Fact is stranger than fiction. Linux Mint and Debian may share a common heritage, but that's where the similarities end.

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Also:

  • Security notice: Meltdown and Spectre

    If you haven’t already done so, please read “Meltdown and Spectre“.

    These vulnerabilities are critical. They expose all memory data present on the computer to any application running locally (including to scripts run by your web browser).

    Note: Meltdown and Spectre also affect smart phones and tablets. Please seek information on how to protect your mobile devices.

  • Linux Mint Devs Respond to Meltdown and Spectre Security Vulnerabilities

    Linux Mint developers have published today a statement regarding the recently unearthed Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities, informing users on how to keep their PCs secure.

    Last week, two of the most severe security flaws were publicly disclosed as Meltdown and Spectre, affecting billions of devices powered by a modern processor from Intel, AMD, ARM, or Qualcomm. To mitigate these vulnerabilities, OEMs and OS vendors started a two and half months long battle to redesign software and kernels.

    Almost all known operating systems are affected, and all web browsers. Linux Mint is one of the most popular GNU/Linux distributions out there with millions of users, but it hasn't yet been patched against Meltdown and Spectre because it still relies on updates from the Ubuntu operating system.

9 Best Linux Distros For Programming And Developers (2018 Edition)

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Linux-based operating systems are often used by developers to get their work done and create something new. Their major concerns while choosing a Linux distro for programming are compatibility, power, stability, and flexibility. Distros like Ubuntu and Debian have managed to establish themselves as the top picks. Some of the other great choices are openSUSE, Arch Linux, etc. If you intend to buy a Raspberry Pi and start with it, Raspbian is the perfect way to start.

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The 5 best Linux distros for the enterprise: Red Hat, Ubuntu, Linux Mint and more

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Three of the five Linux distributions discussed offer reliable and professional-grade support, all have frequent updates to ensure that security exploits are addressed in a timely manner, and all have at least some level of corporate connectivity baked in. In addition, all of them can run Windows programs through virtual machines or subsystems such as Wine. That ability might appeal to executives, but it raises the question of whether it’s really necessary or even a good idea.

There’s also a big cost difference between deploying Linux and Windows: Linux itself is free, so it’s the distributor’s support that you’ll pay for. And, yes, you will want to do that. The price for proper enterprise-ready support still makes Linux desktop a much less expensive option.

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Software: Eddy, KDE, and GNU

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Software
  • Eddy - Easily Install Debian Packages on Elementary

    Eddy is a simple Debian package management GUI tool in Elementary OS that allows installation of Debian packages by dragging and dropping Debian files onto a GUI window. The tool can be installed straight from App Center platform or installed from source. Let's see how we can install from source on Elementary 0.4.1 Loki.

    Installing from AppCenter is the preferred way of installing Eddy since it contains the stable, tested version of the application. Compiling from source provides you with the latest "commit" with the newest functionality that may not be released as a part of an update in AppCenter or in general.

  • Season Of KDE 2018

    It’s been 5 months since I came to GCompris community, but it feels it was a few days back. I came here as a newbie in open source, not even knowing how to ask sensible questions (that’s very important which I learned during my works in GCompris), not even knowing how and where to begin.

    But I deeply thank our awesome community and helpful mentors, Johnny Jazeix, Timothee Giet, Divyam Madaan, Emmanuel Charruau and Rudra Nil Basu who kept guiding me and helped me constantly in my tasks through which I learned a lot of things, which otherwise I could have never got the opportunity to learn.

    [...]

    I will continue to contribute to GCompris for a long time and help our software grow, as much as I can.

  • Beginning 2018

    2017 began with the once-in-a-lifetime trip to India to speak at KDE.Conf.in. That was amazing enough, but the trip to a local village, and visiting the Kaziranga National Park were too amazing for words.

    Literal highlight of last year were the eclipse and trip to see it with my son Thomas, and Christian and Hailey's wedding, and the trip to participate with my daughter Anne, while also spending some time with son Paul, his wife Tara and my grandson Oscar. This summer I was able to spend a few days in Brooklyn with Colin and Rory as well on my way to Akademy. So 2017 was definitely worth living through!

    [...]

    First, I'm so happy that soon Kubuntu will again be distributing 17.10 images next week. Right now we're in testing in preparation for that; pop into IRC if you'd like to help with the testing (#kubuntu-devel). https://kubuntu.org/getkubuntu/ next week!

  • Ten Things I Wish I’d Known About bash

     

    Here I’ve focussed on the things that either confused me or increased my power and productivity in bash significantly, and tried to communicate them (as in my book) in a way that emphasises getting the understanding right.

  • Emacs for Science

        

    I typically cover software packages that do actual calculations to advance scientific knowledge, but here I'm exploring a slightly stranger tool in the arsenal of scientific computation.

    Emacs is a text editor that has almost all the functionality of an operating system. A collection of enhancements and configuration settings are available bundled under the name of scimax. Being an Emacs user myself, I was surprised I'd never heard of it before now. This project has been in development for some time, but it recently has started to find wider attention.

4MLinux 23.2 released.

Filed under
GNU
Linux

This is a minor (point) release in the 4MLinux STABLE channel, which comes with the Linux kernel 4.9.75 (*). The 4MLinux Server now includes Apache 2.4.29, MariaDB 10.2.11, and PHP 7.0.26 (see this post for more details). Additionally, some popular programs (Audacity, Chromium, VLC) have been updated, too. 4MLinux 23.2 includes bugfixes for VLC (which now plays the "https" network streams correctly) and Chromium (restored good sound quality).

You can update your 4MLinux by executing the "zk update" command in your terminal (fully automatic process).

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Plasma 5.12 LTS beta available in PPA for testing on Artful & Bionic

Adventurous users, testers and developers running Artful 17.10 or our development release Bionic 18.04 can now test the beta version of Plasma 5.12 LTS. Read more Also: Kubuntu 17.10 and 18.04 Users Can Now Try the KDE Plasma 5.12 LTS Desktop

Leftovers: Proprietary Software, HowTos, and GXml

Debian Developers: Google Summer of Code, Quick Recap of 2017

  • RHL'18 in Saint-Cergue, Switzerland
    In between eating fondue and skiing, I found time to resurrect some of my previous project ideas for Google Summer of Code. Most of them are not specific to Debian, several of them need co-mentors, please contact me if you are interested.
  • Quick recap of 2017
         After the Stretch release, it was time to attend DebConf’17 in Montreal, Canada. I’ve presented the latest news on the Debian Installer front there as well. This included a quick demo of my little framework which lets me run automatic installation tests. Many attendees mentioned openQA as the current state of the art technology for OS installation testing, and Philip Hands started looking into it. Right now, my little thing is still useful as it is, helping me reproduce regressions quickly, and testing bug fixes… so I haven’t been trying to port that to another tool yet. I also gave another presentation in two different contexts: once at a local FLOSS meeting in Nantes, France and once during the mini-DebConf in Toulouse, France. Nothing related to Debian Installer this time, as the topic was how I helped a company upgrade thousands of machines from Debian 6 to Debian 8 (and to Debian 9 since then). It was nice to have Evolix people around, since we shared our respective experience around automation tools like Ansible and Puppet.

Devices: Raspberry Pi and Android