Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

GNU

Screencasts and Shows

Filed under
GNU
Linux

  • Xubuntu 20.04 LTS overview | A operating system that combines elegance and ease of use.

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of Xubuntu 20.04 LTS and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • 2020-05-22 | Linux Headlines

    GNOME and Rothschild Patent Imaging resolve their legal dispute, massive layoffs loom at IBM, WordPress invests millions into the Matrix project, and two companies unexpectedly re-release code under open source licenses.

  • Real Python Episode 10: Python Job Hunting in a Pandemic

    Do you know someone in the Python community who recently was let go from their job due to the pandemic? What does the job landscape currently look like? What are skills and techniques that will help you in your job search? This week we have Kyle Stratis on the show to discuss how he is managing his job search after just being let go from his data engineering job. Kyle is a member of the Real Python team and has written several articles for the site.

    We discuss Kyle’s career and the skills that he’s developed, which are currently helping him in his job search. Kyle left academia to work as a data engineer. His background helps him to communicate between teams of scientists and engineers.

    We also talk about Kyle’s recent article on combining data in Pandas. Kyle shares a tip on Pandas efficiency, and hints at some lesser known features of Python generators.

  • Brunch with Brent: Kyle Rankin | Jupiter Extras 73

    Brent sits down with Kyle Rankin, Chief Security Officer and Vice President at Purism and former Tech Editor and columnist at Linux Journal. We explore his 10+ years with Linux Journal, as well as Purism's culture, ideals, product design and engineering philosophies, and more.

Linux Fu: Alternative Shells

Filed under
GNU
Linux

On Unix — the progenitor of Linux — there was /bin/sh. It was simple, by comparison to today’s shells, but it allowed you to enter commands and — most importantly — execute lists of commands. In fact, it was a simple programming language that could make decisions, loop, and do other things to allow you to write scripts that were more than just a list of programs to run. However, it wasn’t always the easiest thing to use, so in true Unix fashion, people started writing new shells. In this post, I want to point out a few shells other than the ubiquitous bash, which is one of the successors to the old sh program.

Since the 7th Edition of Unix, sh was actually the Bourne shell, named after its author, Stephen Bourne. It replaced the older Thompson shell written in 1971. That shell had some resemblance to a modern shell, but wasn’t really set up for scripting. It did have the standard syntax for redirection and piping, though. The PWB shell was also an early contender to replace Thompson, but all of those shells have pretty much disappeared.

You probably use bash and, honestly, you’ll probably continue to use bash after reading this post. But there are a few alternatives and for some people, they are worth considering. Also, there are a few special-purpose shells you may very well encounter even if your primary shell is bash.

Read more

Microsoft Build: Same old recycled stuff, no upcycling

Filed under
GNU
Microsoft

Often, a proprietary software company's silence can speak as loudly as their latest campaign against a computer user's right to freedom. This is the case with Microsoft's developer-centric "Build" event. While Microsoft announced a few more welcome additions to its free software output, it missed the opportunity to demonstrate a real commitment to user freedom by upcycling its recently abandoned Windows 7 operating system under a free software license.

The predictable failure here here fits together well with the corporation's complex history of mixed messaging on freedom, which once compared copyleft to "a virus that gobbles up intellectual property like a Pac-Man," and yet now would have you believe that it "loves [free software]." Our Upcycle Windows 7 petition has given Microsoft the perfect opportunity to take the next step in its promotion of free software, to show that its "love" was real. We are disappointed, but not surprised, that they have ignored this call from us and thousands of potential users.

Although the petition signatures and "special gift" were signed, sealed, and delivered safely to their Redmond, WA headquarters, the FSF has not received any response from a Microsoft representative. Of course, the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted the operations of even the largest companies, but as of yet, we haven't heard anything from Microsoft suggesting this was the reason for the lack of response. They certainly seem to have had the resources to put on a 48-hour video marathon about proprietary software.

Read more

CAINE: The Best Digital Forensics Tool

Filed under
GNU
Linux

CAINE is a professional open-source forensic platform that integrates powerful scripts into its GUI. The tool is an Italian GNU/Linux live distribution, which offers an operational environment for forensic investigative processes, including preservation, collection, examination, and analysis.

The platform is a live Linux distribution, and users can boot it using a flash drive or an optical disk. It can also be run on memory. There are a few other installation options that involve physical as well as virtual systems.

To download CAINE, visit the CAINE Live download page. It is now in its 11th version, which can be booted on UEFI/UEFI+Secure and Legacy BIOS. Also, it allows the platform to be installed on older as well as new operating systems, including Windows NT, Linux, and even Windows 10.

Read more

NuTyX 11.5 available with cards 2.4.115

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I'm very pleased to announce the new NuTyX 11.5 release.

The 64-bit version contains about 700 packages upgraded.

The 32-bit version of NuTyX, still actively supported.

In the newest release, base NuTyX comes with the Long-Term Support (LTS) kernel 4.19.123 (4.9.224 for the 32-bit version).

For 64-bit systems,the kernel release 5.6.13 is also available.

Changelogs for the kernels are available here: kernel 4.19.123 changlog kernel 5.6.13 changelog

The gnu c library, glibc, is now glibc 2.31

The graphical server is xorg-server 1.20.8.

The mesa lib is 20.0.6, gtk3 is 3.24.20, and qt has been updated to 5.14.2.

Python interpreters 3.8.3 and 2.7.18 have been included in this release.

The MATE Desktop Environment comes in 1.24.0, the latest version.

The XFCE Desktop Environment comes in 4.14.1, the latest version.

The KDE Plasma Desktop is now 5.18.5, the Framework is now 5.70.0 and applications are now 20.04.1

Available browsers are: firefox 76.0.1, falkon 3.1.0, epiphany 3.36.1, etc

Many desktop applications have been updated as well like thunderbird 68.8.0, Scribus 1.5.5, libreoffice 6.4.3.2, gimp 2.10.18, etc.

Read more

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux in the Ham Shack, FLOSS Weekly and TLLTS

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • LHS Episode #346: Project Update Round Table

    Hello and welcome to Episode 346 of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this episode, the hosts invite listeners on to talk about current projects--open source, amateur radio or otherwise--that they're working on. Several interesting topics evolve out of the conversation from digital modes to Internet linked radio systems to satellite operation. And there's so much more than that. Thank you for tuning in. We hope you find this episode entertaining and informative.

  • FLOSS Weekly 579: MindsDB

    Doc Searls and Dan Lynch talk to Jorge Torres, Co-Founder and CEO of MindsDB. MindsDB is a free, open-source autoML framework to streamline the use of neural networks. It's designed to make it super easy for developers to deploy machine learning in their projects.

  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 858

    3d printing grammaphone, windows package manager winget, desktop environments vs window managers, stuff going on

Screencasts and Audiocasts: Kali Linux 2020.2 KDE Plasma, Ubuntu Podcast and Linux Headlines

Filed under
GNU
Linux

  • Kali Linux 2020.2 KDE Plasma overview

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of Kali Linux 2020.2 KDE Plasma and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S13E08 – Black cats

    This week we’ve been live streaming on YouTube. We discuss upgrading home networks and optimising power line adapters, WiFi and broadband connections. A bumper crop of network-related command line love and all your wonderful feedback.

  • 2020-05-20 | Linux Headlines

    Microsoft's Build conference showcases a slew of Linux-related tech, Slackware adds PAM support, Red Hat's Skopeo hits 1.0, The Tor Project unveils a new community portal, and Canonical is developing a progressive release feature for Snapcraft.

The Free Operating System That’s Identical To macOS

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Mac

iRaspbian comes with a series of built-in apps, including Chromium Media Edition (the version of the web browser that allows you to use services such as Netflix), LibreOffice and the GIMP art package - all of which have their own icons on the Dock.

Read more

Best music players for Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Music lovers are always looking for the best tools to listen to their favorite albums. And while streaming music services are becoming increasingly popular, many of us still have gigantic music libraries on our hard drives that we can hardly replace or abandon altogether. Many players are able to combine both functions and allow us to play our favorite music.

In this article we outline some of the best Linux music players.

Read more

GNU Projects: GCC 11 and denemo 2.4

Filed under
GNU
  • GCC 11 Adds CPU Detection For Newer Intel Families

    Adding to the early changes accumulating for the GCC 11 development cycle is automatic CPU detection support for newer families of Intel CPUs.

    The updated Intel processor detection merged today in GCC 11/Git is for Airmont, Tremont, Comet Lake, Ice Lake, and Tiger Lake families.

  • GCC 11 Picks Up A New Option For Large Source Files

    When seeing GCC 11 in its early development state pick up a new -flarge-source-files option I was curious what that was all about....

    The "-flarge-source-files" option was recently merged into what will become version 11 of the GNU Compiler Collection. Does it do anything to speed-up the compilation of large source files or other improvements? No. It's actually about allowing GCC to track line/column numbers for larger source files.

    To now by default GCC will bail out on tracking column numbers after having gone through a lot of line numbers in a source file. But when it bails out on the column tracking in large source files, it also means warnings around misleading indentations and the like will no longer work.

  • denemo @ Savannah: Release 2.4 now available
    New Features 
            Omission Criteria 
                A lightweight alternative to Score Layouts 
                A single flag turns on/off features of the score 
            Swing Playback 
                Playback with altered note durations 
                Use for Jazz swing and note inègales 
            Page Turner/Annotater 
                Annotate while playing from digital score 
                Page turn digital score from pedals 
            New from Current 
                Create a new score using the current one as template 
                Use for books of songs, sonatas etc to keep style uniform 
    Bug Fixes 
            Easier object edit interface 
            After Grace command now fully automatic 
            Crash on Windows during delete measure all staffs 
            Template save bugs fixed 
            Assign Instrument command in score with voices fixed.
    
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

FSF Chasing Members and GNU Project Has a Dozen New Releases This Month

  • Don’t miss your chance to win fabulous prizes: Get your friends to join the FSF!

    As you may already know, every associate member is incredibly valuable to the Free Software Foundation (FSF). Since most of our funding comes from individual donations and memberships, associate members aren’t just a number. Each new membership magnifies our reach and our ability to effect social change, by demonstrating your commitment to the crucial cause of software freedom. Right now, FSF associate members have the opportunity to reap some fantastic rewards by participating in our virtual LibrePlanet membership drive. We still have the raffle prizes generously donated by Technoethical, Vikings, JMP.chat, and ThinkPenguin for this year’s LibrePlanet conference, which we held entirely online this year due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Now, we’re giving them away to those who go the extra mile to help us grow by referring new annual associate members to sign up!

  • May GNU Spotlight with Mike Gerwitz: 12 new releases!

    bison-3.6.2 denemo-2.4.0 emms-5.4 freeipmi-1.6.5 gcc-10.1.0 gdb-9.2 gnuastro-0.12 gnuhealth-3.6.4 mediagoblin-0.10.0 nano-4.9.3 nettle-3.6 parallel-20200522

Programming: SDL, QML, Python, Awk/Bash and More

  • Photoframe Hack

    Sometimes you just want to get something done. Something for yourself. You do not intend it to be reused, or even pretty. You build a tool. My tool was a photoframe with some basic overlays. I wanted the family calendar, some weather information (current temperature + forecast), time, and the next bus heading for the train station. [...] I also have a bunch of REST calls to my local home assistant server. Most of these reside in the HassButton class, but I also get the current temperature from there. These are hardcoded for my local network, so needs refactoring to be used outside of my LAN. All of these interfaces require API keys of one kind or another – be it a proper key, or a secret URL. These are pulled from environment variables in main.cpp and then exposed to QML. That way, you can reuse the components without having to share your secrets.

  • Writing the Ultimate Locking Check

    In theory a clever programmer could discover all the bugs in a piece of software just by examining it carefully, but in reality humans can't keep track of everything and they get distracted easily. A computer could use the same logic and find the bugs through static analysis. There are two main limitations for static analysis. The first is that it is hard to know the difference between a bug and feature. Here we're going to specify that holding a lock for certain returns is a bug. This rule is generally is true but occasionally the kernel programmers hold a lock deliberately. The second limitation is that to understand the code, sometimes you need to understand how the variables are related to each other. It's difficult to know in advance which variables are related and it's impossible to track all the relationships without running out of memory. This will become more clear later. Nevertheless, static analysis can find many bugs so it is a useful tool. Many static analysis tools have a check for locking bugs. Smatch has had one since 2002 but it wasn't exceptional. My first ten patches in the Linux kernel git history fixed locking bugs and I have written hundreds of these fixes in the years since. When Smatch gained the ability to do cross function analysis in 2010, I knew that I had to re-write the locking check to take advantage of the new cross function analysis feature. When you combine cross function analysis with top of the line flow analysis available and in depth knowledge of kernel locks then the result is the Ultimate Locking Check! Unfortunately, I have a tendency towards procrastination and it took me a decade to get around to it, but it is done now. This blog will step through how the locking analysis works.

  • Raising the ground

    To read this blog I recommend you to be familiar with C programming language and (not mandatory) basics about SDL2. The main goal of this blog is not to give you a copy and paste code, instead it will guide you along the way until you get results by your own merit, also if you find any issues/mistakes/room for improvement please leave a response, thanks for reading.

  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #422 (May 26, 2020)
  • Real Python: A Beginner's Guide to Pip

    What is pip? pip is the standard package manager for Python. It allows you to install and manage additional packages that are not part of the Python standard library. This course is an introduction to pip for new Pythonistas.

  • Awk Cheatsheet And Examples

    Awk is a great utility for text parsing and maniupulation. All unix operating systems have Awk installed by default. If you are on Windows. Please check out at the bottom of this tutorial on how to install and enable awk on Windows.

  • Printing repeats within repeats, and splitting a list into columns

    Repeats within repeats. BASH printf is a complex piece of machinery. The man page says a printf command should look like printf FORMAT [ARGUMENT]..., which makes it seem the "argument" is the thing to be printed and the "format" describes how.

Devices/Embedded With Linux

  • Gemini Lake industrial mini-PCs are loaded with USB and COM ports

    GigaIPC latest QBiX Series industrial mini-PCs run Linux or Windows on Intel Gemini Lake and offer up to 8x USB and 5x COM ports plus dual displays, GbE, SATA III, M.2, and ruggedization features. Taiwanese computer vendor Gigabyte primarily produces consumer and enterprise desktop PC and server equipment, so we were surprised in 2017 when it launched an embedded 3.5-inch, Intel Apollo Lake GA-SBCAP3350 SBC. The following year in 2018, Gigabyte spun off GigaIPC as an embedded unit, and it has already generated a large catalog of Intel-based products including Micro-ATX, Mini-ITX, thin Mini-ITX, and 110 x 105mm “10×10” boards. There are 15 different 3.5-inch “QBi Pro” boards much like the GA-SBCAP3350, but also available with Whiskey Lake and Kaby Lake-U processors.

  • 19″ Rackmounts Support up to 12 Raspberry Pi SBCs

    Last time, we wrote about myelectronics.nl we covered their Tesla Cybertruck Case for Intel NUCs which housed the mini PC into a mini CyberTruck looking enclosure. The company has now come up with new housing solutions specifically designed for Raspberry Pi 1/2/3/4 Model B/B+ boards.

  • PoE-ready Ryzen V1000 SBC is all about camera control

    Axiomtek’s “MIRU130” SBC targets embedded vision applications with a Ryzen V1000 SoC, 4x USB 3.1 Gen2, HDMI and DP ports, cam triggers and lighting controls, 2x M.2, PCIe x16, and 4x GbE ports, 2x of which offer PoE. Axiomtek recently launched a CAPA13R, joineing Seco’s similarly 3.5-inch SBC-C90 as the only SBCs we have seen based on AMD’s Ryzen Embedded V100. Now Axiomtek has returned with a larger, V1000-based MIRU130 motherboard with a 244 x 170mm form factor that falls in between Mini-ITX and Micro-ATX.

  • IAR Systems Delivers Efficient Embedded Software Building on Linux

    Through the C/C++ compiler and debugger toolchain IAR Embedded Workbench®, IAR Systems provides its customers with the market's most diverse microcontroller support as well as adapted licensing options to fit different organizations' needs. This flexibility is now extended to the build environment as the well-known build tools in IAR Embedded Workbench now support Linux. The tools offer leading code quality, outstanding optimizations for size and speed, and fast build times. Supporting implementation in Linux-based frameworks for automated application build and test processes, the tools enable large-scale deployments of critical software building and testing and is suitable for installations ranging from a few licenses on a small build server, to massive installations with several hundreds of parallel builds active at the same time.

  • Librem 5 April 2020 Software Development Update

    This is another incarnation of the software development progress for the Librem 5. This time for April 2020 (weeks 14-18). Some items are covered in more detail in separate blog posts at https://puri.sm/news. The idea of this summaries is so you can have a closer look at the coding and design side of things. It also shows how much we’re standing on the shoulders of giants reusing existing software and how contributions are flowing back and forth. So these reports are usually rather link heavy pointing to individual merge requests on https://source.puri.sm/ or to the upstream side (like e.g. GNOME’s gitlab.)

Games: Burning Knight, Elder Scrolls, Cities: Skylines and PyGame

  • Burning Knight is a roguelike where you rob a dungeon, coming soon

    At least the setting is honest, you're totally robbing the dungeons in Burning Knight and then attempting to flee. Burning Knight is an action-packed procedurally generated roguelike, with fast-paced action and plenty of exploration across various floors in the Burning Knight's castle that you're stealing goods from. It can turn into a bullet-hell in some rooms, there's hundreds of items to find and they can be combined to "build your very own game-breaking combos" and it does sound awesome. The developer, Rexcellent Games, just announced on Twitter yesterday that it's now actually complete. They're waiting on Valve's approval, and it looks like it will hopefully release next month. SteamDB captured the date changing to June 5 but that might be a temporary date.

  • Stadia gets Elder Scrolls Online on June 16, 1440p in web and more

    A few bits of Stadia news for you as Google have announced the next set of additions coming to their game streaming service. For players who were a bit let down by resolution options, there's some good news. As some players already saw across the last few weeks and today being made properly official, 1440p is now an option when playing Stadia in a web browser.

  • Humble Cities: Skylines Bundle is up for some easy city building

    Cities: Skylines, one of the finest city builders ever is now available in a big Humble Bundle for you to grab the base game and lots of extra content. This is honestly a ridiculously good deal and probably the cheapest Cities: Skylines has ever been. For £1 you can get Cities: Skylines and the Deep Focus Radio DLC. Even if you only go for that, there's a lot to enjoy without any expansions.

  • Python Qt5 - PyQt5 and PyGame compatibility with source code.

    This tutorial tries to solve from the objectives related to solving and stabilizing compatibility errors between PyQt4 and PyQt5 and creating a common interface between PyQt5 and PyGame. There is always the same problem in programming when the developer for some reason has to change classes, methods and functions and reusing the old code is no longer valid. In this case, common or other errors occur, which leads to a waste of time.