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Goodbyes to Linux Journal

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • ‘Linux Journal’ Sails Into the Sunset

    Linux Journal is no more. On Friday, publisher Carlie Fairchild wrote that unless “a savior” rides in to save the day, the magazine born in 1994, just two years after Linus Torvalds posted that he was working on an operating system, has already released its last issue.

    This is a publication that’s been with us since before the data center discovered the little operating system that can and before the internet forever changed the publishing industry. Linux Journal started its life printed on dead trees, and until relatively recently was delivered to subscribers’ homes by mail or purchased by non-subscribers at the local newsstand.

  • On the Demise of Linux Journal

    I think it’s probably hard for younger people to imagine what the Linux world was like 20 years ago. Today, it’s really not an exaggeration to say that the Internet as we know it wouldn’t exist at all without Linux. Almost every major Internet company you can think of runs almost completely on Linux. Amazon, Google, Facebook, Twitter, etc, etc. All Linux. In 1997, though, the idea of running a production workload on Linux was pretty far out there.

Rocks 7.0 is Released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The latest update of Rocks codename Manzanita is now released. Manzanita is a 64-bit only release and is based upon CentOS 7.4. The Rocks-supplied OS rolls have all updates applied as of December 1, 2017.

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System76 Shuts Off Intel Back Doors, But Will Continue to Pay Intel

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
Security
  • System76 Will Begin Disabling Intel ME In Their Linux Laptops

    Following the recent Intel Management Engine (ME) vulnerabilities combined with some engineering work the past few months on their end, System76 will begin disabling ME on their laptops.

  • Linux hardware vendor outlines Intel Management Engine firmware plan

    The Linux-equipped computer maker, System76, has detailed plans to update the Intel Management Engine (ME) firmware on its computers in line with Intel’s November 20th vulnerability announcement. In July, System76 began work on a project to automatically deliver firmware to System76 laptops which works in a similar fashion to how software is usually delivered through the operating system.

  • System76 to disable Intel Management Engine on its notebooks

    Intel has recently confirmed the earlier findings of third parties who revealed that its Management Engine firmware has some serious security issues. Since we talked about this recently, we should now move to System76's approach in handling this situation.

Alpine Linux 3.7.0 Released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

We are pleased to announce the release of Alpine Linux 3.7.0, the first in the v3.7 stable series.

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Also: Alpine Linux 3.7 Brings EFI Support, Installer Option For GRUB

Want to switch from Apple macOS to Linux because of the 'root' security bug? Give deepin 15.5 a try!

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Mac
Security

Apple's macOS is a great operating system. Not only is it stable and beautifully designed, but it very secure too. Well, usually it is. Unless you live under a rock, you definitely heard about the macOS High Sierra security bug that made the news over the last couple of days. In case you somehow are unaware, the bug essentially made it so anyone could log into any Mac running the latest version of the operating system.

Luckily, Apple has already patched the bug, and some people -- like me -- have forgiven the company. Understandably, not everyone will be as forgiving as me. Undoubtedly, there are Mac users that are ready to jump ship as a result of the embarrassing bug. While that is probably an overreaction, if you are set on trying an alternative operating system, you should not go with Windows 10. Instead, you should embrace Linux. In fact, rather serendipitously, a Linux distribution with a UI reminiscent of macOS gets a new version today. Called "deepin," version 15.5 of the distro is now ready to download.

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Also: deepin 15.5 Linux Distro Released — Get A Beautiful And Easy-to-use Linux Experience

System76 will disable Intel Management engine on its Linux laptops

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

System76 is one a handful of companies that sells computers that run Linux software out of the box. But like most PCs that have shipped with Intel’s Core processors in the past few years, System76 laptops include Intel’s Management Engine firmware.

Intel recently confirmed a major security vulnerability affecting those chips and it’s working with PC makers to patch that vulnerability.

But System76 is taking another approach: it’s going to roll out a firmware update for its recent laptops that disables the Intel Management Engine altogether.

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Trisquel 8 "Flidas"

Filed under
GNU
Linux

This article mentions basic information and links about Trisquel 8 GNU/Linux operating system codenamed "Flidas". This article is for beginners who interested in Trisquel but have difficulties to find collective resources about Flidas. This article is also for developers who want to help Trisquel development but don't know where to go. This article may be updated later as Flidas is currently being developed for the final release. I hope this article helps Trisquel 8 development as much as possible.

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Also: Upgrade Abrowser to v57, the Firefox Quantum for Trisquel 8 GNU/Linux

Linux Successes (And Failures) in 2017

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Linux Gaming: Despite what you may hear from those gamers who are game title loyal to Windows-specific video games, 2017 has been a decent year for gaming on the Linux desktop. Some of the most notable games have come from video game publisher, Feral Interactive. Notable title examples provided by this publisher include XCOM 2, Tomb Raider, Mad Max, and Total War: WARHAMMER (among other great game titles).

Discovery and installation of great Linux games is possible because of Steam (Valve), GoG.com, and the Humble Bundle. It's also worth noting that crowd sourcing efforts on Kick Starter (among others) has also given Linux gaming a fair bit of traction. I think overall, Valve's Steam client provides the best example of Linux game discovery and even curation thanks to the ample reviews and user generated lists to help gamers decide on their next purchase.

It's also worth mentioning that there are actually entire distros dedicated to Linux gaming. The first one, based on Debian is called Steam OS as it's provided by Valve. Steam OS makes sense if you plan on running it as a dedicated gaming box or pre-installed on a "Steam Machine."

Another great gaming distro that I personally think is vastly more interesting than Steam OS is Sparky Linux. While it lacks the big company backing found with Valve's offering, it does come with WINE support pre-installed. This is useful for those of you who also enjoy playing WINE supported Windows games on your Linux box. I also love how it utilizes a lightweight desktop environment which means more resources are dedicated to your Linux gaming.

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Q4OS Linux Loves Windows: Q4OS for Windows 10 Installer Now Officially Available

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Softpedia has just been informed by the Q4OS team about the general availability of their brand-new Q4OS for Windows 10 installer that lets you install the Linux distro alongside Windows.

Q4OS is a Debian-based GNU/Linux distribution created with the ex-Windows user in mind. It uses the Trinity Desktop Environment (TDE) by default to make the Windows to Linux migration easier, and there's now an official installer to help newcomers install Q4OS alongside their Windows 10 installations on the same computer.

"We are happy to introduce a first stable release of the Q4OS for Windows 10 installer. It allows everyone to install Q4OS alongside Windows in an easy way, with no need of modifying an existing Windows operating system, nor any of software installed, even with no need of repartitioning your disk drive," said the Q4OS team.

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Lakka 2.1 Stable release

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Movies

After 6 month of intense development and bugfixes, the team is proud to announce the stable release of Lakka 2.1!

This release is a huge step forward in many aspects: UI, emulator cores, and supported hardware.

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Linux Mint 18.3 “Sylvia” KDE and Xfce

  • Linux Mint 18.3 “Sylvia” KDE released!
    Linux Mint 18.3 is a long term support release which will be supported until 2021. It comes with updated software and brings refinements and many new features to make your desktop even more comfortable to use.
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Kdenlive 17.12.0 released

We are happy to announce the latest Kdenlive version, part of the KDE Applications 17.12 release, making it the last major release using the current code base. This is a maintenance release focused on stability, while feature development is going in next year’s 18.04 version. Proxy clips were given some attention and should give you better seeking experience as well as reduced memory usage for images. Other fixes include fixes in timeline preview, a crash when using a Library clip and smoother seeking on rewind playback. Read more

Systemd 236 Brings Support For LUKS2 Encrypted Partitions, New Options

Lennart Poettering has announced the release of systemd 236 as the init system's final release of 2017. Systemd 236 is another significant feature release and includes support for the LUKS2 on-disk format for encrypted partitions, bootctl list can now list all available boot menu options, improved cgroup option, various systemd-networkd networking improvements, support for setting the initial keyboard mapping systemd-firstboot, several new systemd-resolve command line arguments, and other minor improvements throughout the systemd landscape. Read more

Red Hat: 5 focal points for Kubernetes

Linux runs the containers and manages resources and security. The container runtime manages host-level instantiation and resource assignment (for example Docker or CRI-O). IT departments can use Kubernetes to: Read more