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GNU

City of Rome is getting ready for open source

Filed under
GNU
Linux
OSS

The city of Rome (Italy) is taking well-orchestrated steps to increase its use of free and open source software, aiming to reduce lock-in to IT vendors. A key change is an overhaul of the way IT solutions and support services are contracted; in all future contracts, Rome will require IT service providers to help the city switch to alternatives to proprietary software.

This means change is coming soon. Many of the current IT contracts will need to be renewed next year, and by 2020 all current contracts will have been renewed, says Cecilia Colasanti, who works for Rome’s city councillor for Digital Innovation.

[...]

In 2018, Rome will run a pilot to test the use of workstations running Linux. Some of the IT support staff already have much experience with Linux servers and workstations, which should help resolve possible issues with network drives, shared folders and peripherals such as printers.

Rome’s IT department is supporting the city council’s wish to get rid of IT vendor lock-in, says Ms Colasanti, “We are working together closely, for without their support, change won’t happen.”

Commencement of the switch to open source was announced by the city in early September. "Currently, about one-third of our IT spending is distributed among just six IT vendors, some of which have been operating within the administration for more than three decades", the announcement quotes Councillor Flavia Marzano as saying. "Our choice to implement free software intends to end the oligarchy in this industry.”

Rome’s city council decided to switch to open source in October 2016.

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Librem 5 Smartphone Hits Its $1.5 Million Dollar Goal

Filed under
GNU
Linux

With two weeks left in the crowdfunding campaign, Purism's Librem 5 smartphone initiative crossed its $1,500,000 USD funding goal.

While the campaign started out slow, it picked up immensely following the endorsements from the GNOME Foundation and KDE e.V. as well as word of Plasma Mobile coming to it, perhaps by default, but still too early to tell whether GNOME or KDE will win the default UI/UX of the Librem 5.

As of writing, the campaign sits at $1,508,358. This is made up of 146 developers ordering a $299 USD developer kit, 1,833 backers giving $599 USD for a Librem 5 phone, 19 spending $1399 to get the phone plus a 24-inch monitor, 29 backing at $1699 for the phone and a 30-inch monitor, two backing at $9,999 for getting 10 phones, and seven in at $19,999 USD for 10 phones and a greater enterprise bundle. So all in at this stage are just under 2,000 Librem 5 smartphones pre-ordered and over one hundred developer boards.

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4MParted 23.0 Disk Partitioning Live OS Enters Beta Based on Latest GParted Tool

Filed under
GNU
Linux

After he released last week the third minor maintenance update for the stable 4MLinux 22.0 operating system series, developer Zbigniew Konojacki‏ today informed us on the availability of a Beta version of his upcoming 4MParted 23.0 disk partitioning live system.

Based on the forthcoming 4MLinux 23.0 operating system series, 4MParted 23.0 Beta is using the latest Gparted 0.29.0 open-source and free disk partitioning tool at its core, giving users an independent live system for all sorts of disk partitioning tasks, supporting numerous filesystems.

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Chakra 2017.10 "Goedel" released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

We are excited to announce the second Chakra release of 2017, which you can download now via torrent or https.

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Also: Chakra GNU/Linux 2017.10 "Goedel" Released with KDE Plasma 5.10.5, Linux 4.12.4

System76 - POP! goes my heart

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Reviews

This was far more interesting than I'd expected. One, there isn't ONE font that works uniformly well across different desktop environments, and frankly, that is a little bit disturbing. Two, Ubuntu still offers the most complete default package. Three, POP! fonts are rather nice and modern, and it seems they work the best in stock Gnome, if you're not already using something like Droid Sans.

It would seem we've chipped another facet of this multi-dimensional monster called Linux Fonts, as it feels just impossible to nail down the simple, elegant formula for maximum ergonomics, productivity and fun. You have to ride the licensing, anti-aliasing and hinting shuttles all at the same time, and they seem to be going in different directions. Ubuntu is way ahead of the rest, and this is why the System76 experiment will be rather intriguing. I want to see how the complete package will behave. You should test and see how you feel about Roboto Slab and Fira. My hunch says, Gnome great, Ubuntu, not so much. But we will see. And of course, we shall be testing the distro, so stay tuned.

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IPFire 2.19 - Core Update 114 released

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

This is the official release announcement for IPFire 2.19 – Core Update 114. It brings some changes under the hood and modernises the base system. On top of that, minor issues are being fixed and some packages have been updated.

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Desktop/Mobile: Google Pixelbook, The Geezer and the Penguin, ThinkPad Anniversary, Pixel 2 and Purism’s Linux Phone

Filed under
Android
GNU
Linux
Gaming
  • Google Pixelbook hands-on: Stunning hardware with the usual limited OS

    The Google Pixelbook is the latest in a line of flagship Chrome OS laptops that are extremely nice and extremely expensive. If it ran anything other than Chrome OS, it would be a top-tier laptop, but it does run Chrome OS, so for $1,000, it's kind of a hard sell.

    Boy, is it a sharp piece of hardware. It's wrapped in aluminum, like previous Chromebook Pixels. The palm rest is covered in a rubbery silicon pad, which feels fantastic to rest your wrists on while typing. It also serves as a great gripping point when you fold the laptop into its various modes. Hopefully this surface can stand up to the wear and tear of a laptop palm rest.

    The back has a top glass panel, just like the Pixel Phones, which serves to let wireless signals in and out. The screen has a glass cover, too, along with the trackpad. The Google Hardware division is clearly working hard to make its products look like a cohesive family, and you can tell the basis for the Pixelbook's back design is the white-and-silver Google Pixel. Just like the phone, the laptop has a silver-colored metal body with a contrasting, white-colored glass back. The only problem is that the silver/white color scheme only matches last year's Google Pixel. This year, a silver body is not an option on the Pixel 2. So close, Google!

  • The Geezer and the Penguin

    Microsoft was not interested in giving away any secrets, of course, but I found there was a whole different system called Linux that was famous for revealing every detail of how its software operated.

    At the time, Linux was often described in the general press as being for geeks only, but all the people who seemed to know something about it said Linux just took a bit of learning-by-experience – you didn't have to be an IT expert. In my archives I've saved an article from 2007 in PC Magazine by Neil Randall titled "Linux – you can do it!" That's the one that really gave me hope.

  • Lenovo Unwraps the 25th Anniversary ThinkPad [Ed: much to celebrate though?]

    Lenovo chose to unwrap the limited-edition anniversary version of its most famous laptop on the ThinkPad’s 25th birthday

  • Lenovo’s 25th Anniversary ThinkPad brings back the keyboard we love
  • 6 Times Google Made Fun Of Apple At Pixel 2 Launch Event
  • 6 Best Free Android Music Players : 2017 Edition
  •   

  • Crowdfunder for a free/open phone crosses $1M mark

    One of the holy grails of free and open computing is a really great free/open phone; it's been tried many times before without much success, but a new crowdfunder from Purism (who make a pretty great free/open laptop) has just crossed the $1,000,000 mark and is on track to hit its target of $1.5M in the next 18 days.

  • Purism’s Linux Phone Crowdfunder Just Passed $1 Million

GNU: GNU Tools Cauldron and New GNU Releases for August and September

Filed under
GNU

GNU/Linux Market Share and FUD

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Linux Market Share Is Stupid | For The Record

    Will the Linux market share even reach 5%? Should we consider Chrome OS a successful example of Linux on the desktop? I ask these questions and discuss the recent revelation that data tracking for Linux usage isn’t always that accurate.

  • Munich, Germany, once an open source champion, begins moving back to Microsoft [Ed: Partly fake news from a Microsoft site because they are only assessing costs; Microsoft corruption there is still probed and the actions challenged at multiple levels.]

    If this work is being done behind the scene, for now, Matthias Kirschner, president of the Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE), explained that “it was agreed that the final decision will be made by the city council members after they receive a calculation of the costs.”

Software: GNU, GNOME, Synapse, and KDE's Amarok

Filed under
GNU
KDE
GNOME
  • GNU Tools Cauldron 2017 Videos Posted

    Videos from the recent GNU Tools Cauldron 2017 are now available online where matters from the GCC compiler to glibc and compiler diagnostics were discussed.

    The GNU Tools Cauldron 2017 took place from 8 to 10 September in Prague. Videos from the event are now online while the slides are sadly not yet available, but are said to be coming soon

  • GNUHealth 3.2.4 patchset released

    GNU Health 3.2.4 patchset has been released !

  • First GNOME 3.26 Point Release Now Rolling Out

    The first point release update to GNOME 3.26 is pretty much out (save for an official announcement). The first of many such releases, GNOME 3.26.1 brings with it bug fixes, performance tuning, and a few other minor tweaks.

  • Synapse – A Semantic Launcher for Searching and Launching Apps and Files

    Synapse is a free and open source quick launcher application with which you can easily start applications and access files using the Zeitgeist engine – kinda reminiscent of Ulauncher and Gnome Pie.

  • KDE's Amarok Music Player Seeing A Possible KF5/Qt5 Port

    It has been several years since last seeing an update to the Amarok open-source music player, but it looks like it may be alive and ticking after all, at least with one developer working towards a KF5/Qt5 port.

    Amarok is among the many KDE/Qt aligned media players from Juk, Cantata, Babe, Elisa, and others, but Amarok really hasn't been updated in quite a while. A Phoronix reader pointed out that a developer is indeed working on a port to using KDE Frameworks 5 and Qt5 and posted some initial patches back in September.

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