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Pi-lovers? There are two new OSes for you to bite

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Owners of dimunitive Raspberry Pi computers rejoice! Alpine has emitted version 3.8.0 of its super light Linux distribution, with some special attention given to the latest iteration of the hardware.

While it has been possible to get Alpine on the Pi for some time – Raspberry Pi 2 owners have been able to get it working since version 3.2.0 – this is the first version to add support for the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ and also offer an arm64 (aarch64) image to ease deployment.

The Pi 3 Model B+ packs a surprising amount of power into a small package, rocking a 64 bit 1.4GHz processor and gigabit ethernet (over USB 2.0). The 1GB RAM (unchanged from the previous Model Cool should give the slimline Alpine incarnation of Linux more than enough headroom, depending what else you decide to run.

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BusyBox version 1.29.0 Continues Support for Embedded Linux Systems

Filed under
OS
GNU

BusyBox version 1.29.0 came out today, and though most GNU/Linux users won’t find it in their repositories just yet it should prove to be an extremely important update nonetheless. There might be no other tool that’s quite as commonplace in the world of open-source software. The single binary provides a number of stripped-down standard Unix tools, and it can run in a variety of other POSIX environments as well as those powered by the Linux kernel.

While it’s historically been used to provide a useful group of tools on devices that used embedded Linux, BusyBox is today included with most desktop and laptop distros as well. You’ll still find it deployed on countless devices. If you fished a command prompt out of a smart thermostat or television, then you might get to use BusyBox-based tools.

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GNU: Guile and Coreutils Releases

Filed under
GNU
  • GNU Guile 2.2.4 released

    We are delighted to announce GNU Guile 2.2.4, the fourth bug-fix release in the new 2.2 stable release series. It fixes many bugs that had accumulated over the last few months, in particular bugs that could lead to crashes of multi-threaded Scheme programs. This release also brings documentation improvements, the addition of SRFI-71, and better GDB support.

  • coreutils-8.30 released [stable]

Cinnamon Icing ... task manager - Ice Ice Desktop

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I like Icing, and I am happy to have discovered it. I believe Linux Mint - and Cinnamon - does not advertise its extensible nature well enough, or the many goodies available, be they desklets, applets, or widgets. They can help enhance the desktop experience, and some of these, like Icing, should even be considered as default options for future editions of the distribution. Just sayin'.

All in all, the icons-only Icing task manager is a refreshing addition to the Cinnamon desktop. It's got lots of options and settings, it's quite pretty, and you lose none of the power features that you previously had. On the contrary, you gain even more granular control over the context menu and thumbnails, and you can customize per-workspace settings. Very cool. In fact, icy cool. Do check it. And for those asking, Mint 19 Tara review coming soon. Dedoimedo out.

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Raspbian Linux OS for Raspberry Pi Gets New First-Boot Configuration Wizard

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GNU
Linux
Debian

Raspberry Pi Foundation’s Raspbian Linux operating system for Raspberry Pi computers received a new stable version with various new features and many improvements.

Coming more than two months after the previous update released on April 18, the Raspbian 2018-06-27 update is now available for Raspberry Pi users to introduce a few enhancements and fix many bugs. The most prominent new feature of this release is the implementation of a new configuration wizard that will be displayed after the first boot.

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Chinese GNU/Linux Distributions: Ubuntu Kylin 18.04 and deepin 15.6

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • An Overview of UKUI Desktop Environment on Ubuntu Kylin 18.04

    UKUI is a new desktop environment for GNU/Linux operating system. It's best known to be the user interface of Ubuntu Kylin, one of official Ubuntu Flavors, hence we can guess the name stands for Ubuntu Kylin User Interface (hence I still didn't find any source about it). Along with it, of course, Ubuntu Kylin 18.04 LTS has been released last April with the latest UKUI. This short overview introduce both the UKUI and the Ubuntu Kylin 18.04 in brief about how they look and what they bring. Enjoy!

  • deepin 15.6 GNU/Linux Download Links, Mirrors, and Torrents

    deepin 15.6 GNU/Linux operating system has been released on Friday, 15 June 2018 with many new things and improvements. It's the continuation of the previous 15.5 released at 30 November 2017 as a part of version 15 the series since 2015. It's available only for 64 bit architecture. Here's the official download link, torrent, and some mirrors from USA, Taiwan, German, and Indonesia. I included the SHA256SUM hash here so you can immediately compare your ISO check result.

"Chromebooks with Linux app support will soon be able to install Debian packages" and More Google-Linux Work

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GNU
Linux
Google
Debian
  • Chromebooks with Linux app support will soon be able to install Debian packages

    Recent code updates indicate forthcoming support for no-fuss Debian .deb package installation on Chrome OS devices that support Linux apps. The forthcoming feature will bring a new flow for installing Linux applications through .deb packages. A string of commits shows that support isn’t simply being turned on, but that all the finicky elements like interacting with the terminal, checking dependencies, and authentication will be hidden from the user.

  • Google aims lower than Android Go with new $22m investment

    KaiOS is one of the fastest growing mobile platforms right now, bringing smart functionality to feature-phones in emerging markets. Google has evidently been paying attention, because the Mountain View firm has made a $22-million investment in the company.

  • LTE-enabled Samsung Chromebook on the way, suggest new commits

    Only days after launching the second version of the Chromebook Plus (V2), Samsung seems to be working on one more variant of the Chromebook. In fact, the South Korean giant is now venturing into the always-connected Chromebook market. XDA Developers have unearthed a Coreboot code commit which shows the introduction of a new SKU of Nautilus (which, if you’re not aware is the codename for the Chromebook Plus V2). The commit clearly shows configuration changes that mention LTE support.

  • Google Updates: More Linux Chromebooks, World Cup tags and 'Better Together'

    Another 18 Chromebooks will be able to run Linux apps soon. The plan to roll out the windowed apps, further making them a viable alternative to Windows, now takes in Chrome OS machines from Lenovo, Acer, Asus and Dell joining the frey.

Release of Linux Mint and Pinguy OS 18.04 Mini LTS

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu
  • Linux Mint 19 “Tara” Cinnamon released!

    Linux Mint 19 is a long term support release which will be supported until 2023. It comes with updated software and brings refinements and many new features to make your desktop even more comfortable to use.

  • Linux Mint 19 “Tara” MATE released!

    Linux Mint 19 is a long term support release which will be supported until 2023. It comes with updated software and brings refinements and many new features to make your desktop even more comfortable to use.

  • Linux Mint 19 "Tara" released

    Linux Mint 19 "Tara" has been released in Cinnamon and MATE editions.

  • Linux Mint 19 Officially Released With Cinnamon, MATE & Xfce Editions

    The Linux Mint crew has delivered on their goal of shipping Linux Mint 19 "Tara" in June.

    Linux Mint 19 is the latest major release of the desktop-focused, easy-to-use Linux distribution. Linux Mint 19 is based off Ubuntu 18.04 LTS rather than the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS base used by the Linux Mint 18.x series.

  • Linux Mint 19 “Tara” Officially Released, It’s Based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

    The Linux Mint project announced today the official and general availability of the Linux Mint 19 “Tara” operating system as Cinnamon, MATE, and Xfce editions.

    Based on Canonical’s Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system series, the Linux Mint 19 “Tara” operating system is available for both 32-bit and 64-bit hardware architectures, comes with the Cinnamon 3.8, MATE 1.20, and Xfce 4.12 desktop environments, and it’s supported for five years until April 2023.

    “Linux Mint 19 is a long term support release which will be supported until 2023. It comes with updated software and brings refinements and many new features to make your desktop even more comfortable to use,” said Clement Lefebvre in today’s announcement. “This new version of Linux Mint contains many improvements.”

  • Pinguy OS 18.04 Mini LTS – Final

4MLinux: More Than Just Another Lightweight Distro

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Reviews

I don’t want to get up on yet another “Here’s another lightweight Linux distribution to revive your aging hardware” soapbox. So many distributions make that promise, and most of them do an outstanding job of fulfilling their mission statement. Also, many of those distributions are fairly similar: They offer a small footprint, work with 32-bit systems, and install a minimal amount of software dedicated to the task of helping you get your work done as best a lightweight operating system can do.

But then there’s 4MLinux. This particular take on the lightweight Linux distribution is a different beast altogether. First and foremost, 4MLinux doesn’t include a package manager. That’s right, the only way you can install packages on this distribution is to do so from source (unless you install the limited number of packages from within the Extensions menu (more on that in a bit). That, of course, can lead to a dependency nightmare. But if you really give it some thought, that could be a serious plus, especially if you’re looking for a distribution that could be considered an ideal desktop for end users with specific use cases. If those users only need to work with a web browser, 4MLinux allows that while preventing users from installing other applications.

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Raspbian Update

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
Debian
  • Raspbian update: first-boot setup wizard and more

    After a few months of hiding in a dark corner of the office muttering to myself (just ask anyone who sits near me how much of that I do…), it’s time to release another update to the Raspberry Pi desktop with a few new bits and a bunch of bug fixes (hopefully more fixes than new bugs, anyway). So, what’s changed this time around?

  • Raspberry Pi's Raspbian Gets New Setup Wizard, New PDF Viewer

    The Raspberry Pi folks have released a new version of their Debian-based Raspbian Linux distribution to end out June.

    This June 2018 update to Raspbian features several user-facing improvements for those using the Raspbian desktop. First up on new installations is now an initial setup wizard to help guide new users to using the OS. This new setup wizard should help with localization, WiFi/network setup, and other settings.

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More in Tux Machines

Debian Development and News

  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, June 2018
    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.
  • PKCS#11 v2.20
    By way of experiment, I've just enabled the PKCS#11 v2.20 implementation in the eID packages for Linux, but for now only in the packages in the "continuous" repository. In the past, enabling this has caused issues; there have been a few cases where Firefox would deadlock when PKCS#11 v2.20 was enabled, rather than the (very old and outdated) v2.11 version that we support by default. We believe we have identified and fixed all outstanding issues that caused such deadlocks, but it's difficult to be sure.
  • Plans for DebCamp and DebConf 18
    I recently became an active contributor to the Debian project, which has been consolidated throughout my GSoC project. In addition to the great learning with my mentors, Lucas Kanashiro and Raphäel Hertzog, the feedback from other community members has been very valuable to the progress we are making in the Distro Tracker. Tomorrow, thanks to Debian project sponsorship, I will take off for Hsinchu, Taiwan to attend DebCamp and DebConf18. It is my first DebConf and I’m looking forward to meeting new people from the Debian community, learn a lot and make useful contributions during the time I am there.
  • Building Debian packages in CI (ick)
    I develop a number of (fairly small) programs, as a hobby. Some of them I also maintain as packages in Debian. All of them I publish as Debian packages in my own APT repository. I want to make the process for making a release of any of my programs as easy and automated as possible, and that includes building Debian packages and uploading them to my personal APT repository, and to Debian itself.
  • My DebCamp/DebConf 18 plans
    Tomorrow I am going to another DebCamp and DebConf; this time at Hsinchu, Taiwan.
  • Things you can do with Debian: multimedia editing
    The Debian operating system serves many purposes and you can do amazing things with it. Apart of powering the servers behind big internet sites like Wikipedia and others, you can use Debian in your PC or laptop. I’ve been doing that for many years. One of the great things you can do is some multimedia editing. It turns out I love nature, outdoor sports and adventures, and I usually take videos and photos with my friends while doing such activities. And when I arrive home I love editing them for my other blog, or putting them together in a video.

32-Bit Vs. 64-Bit Operating System

This has really been confusing to some people choosing between 32-bit and 64-bit systems. Head over to any operating system’s website, you will be given a choice to download either versions of the same operating system. So what is the difference? Why do we have two different versions of the same OS? Let us solve this mystery here, once and for all. Read more

Convert video using Handbrake

Recently, when my son asked me to digitally convert some old DVDs of his high school basketball games, I immediately knew I would use Handbrake. It is an open source package that has all the tools necessary to easily convert video into formats that can be played on MacOS, Windows, Linux, iOS, Android, and other platforms. Handbrake is open source and distributable under the GPLv2 license. It's easy to install on MacOS, Windows, and Linux, including both Fedora and Ubuntu. In Linux, once it's installed, it can be launched from the command line with $ handbrake or selected from the graphical user interface. (In my case, that is GNOME 3.) Read more

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