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GNU

gorss – simple RSS/Atom reader written in Golang

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

A news aggregator is software which collect news, weblog posts, and other information from the web so that they can be read in a single location for easy viewing. With the range of news sources available on the internet, news aggregators play an essential role in helping users to quickly locate breaking news.

There are a number of different file formats which information publishers use. Popular formats are RSS and Atom. RSS is an acronym for Really Simple Syndication. It’s a defined standard based on XML with the specific purpose of delivering updates to web-based content. In other words, RSS is a Web content syndication format.

For individuals that read lots of weblogs, a news aggregator makes keeping track of them effortless, and particularly useful if the weblogs are only updated occasionally. If you follow specific writers, publications and channels, an RSS reader app helps you see all new content that interests you in a central source.

Our roundup of RSS readers recommends FeedReader, Liferea, and Akregator. And there’s other alternatives available. One RSS reader we’ve not previously covered is gorss. It’s first release was only a few months ago.

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Easy Buster 2.1.9 and 2.1.9.1 released

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GNU
Linux

Another release of EasyOS Buster series, versions 2.1.9 and 2.1.9.1. The reason for the two version numbers, is the 2.1.9 build is with the 5.2.21 kernel, and 2.1.9.1 is with the 5.4.2 kernel.

And the reason for building with two different kernels, is that audio does not work on some hardware with the 5.4.x kernel (so far, 5.4, 5.4.1 and 5.4.2).

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The Linux Setup – Kezz Bracey, Web Designer/Developer

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GNU
Linux
Interviews

I found Kezz on Twitter and I’m so glad I did because this is a wonderful interview. First of all, I love the KDE details. Because while I don’t use KDE, I respect it. I wish I could tame it the way Kezz has. Instead, I tend to bow to its will, when really, if I knew how, like Kezz, I could bend it to mine. I also appreciate the screencasting information. I don’t do it very often anymore, but I do know that at some point, there were concerns about the lack of a good Linux screencasting program. Apparently that’s no longer an issue, which is great to hear.

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Raptor Computing Is Working On More AMD Radeon Driver Improvements For POWER

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

Similar to 64-bit ARM (AArch64) improvements we've seen with time for the Radeon Linux driver, Raptor's Timothy Pearson has been working to improve the Radeon support for PowerPC or more specifically POWER9. While NVIDIA offers a POWER9 graphics driver for IBM POWER servers, AMD Radeon graphics jive much better with Raptor's target customers thanks to the open-source driver stack -- allowing a fully open-source graphics/compute stack with the AMD hardware sans the closed-source microcode required by the GPUs, but much better than the completely closed-up NVIDIA driver stack.

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Audiocasts/Shows: Kubernetes Podcast, Linux Headlines and Marcel Gagne

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GNU
Linux
  • When you're in the release team, you're family: the Kubernetes 1.16 release interview

    It is a pleasure to co-host the weekly Kubernetes Podcast from Google with Adam Glick. We get to talk to friends old and new from the community, as well as give people a download on the Cloud Native news every week.

    It was also a pleasure to see Lachlan Evenson, the release manager for Kubernetes 1.16, win the CNCF “Top Ambassador” award at KubeCon. We talked with Lachie when 1.16 was released, and as is becoming a tradition, we are delighted to share an abridged version of that interview with the readers of the Kubernetes Blog.

    If you’re paying attention to the release calendar, you’ll see 1.17 is due out soon. Subscribe to our show in your favourite podcast player for another release interview!

  • 2019-12-06 | Linux Headlines

    The W3C puts forward WebAssembly as an official standard, Azure Sphere gains support for Ubuntu developers, CodeWeek reports back in with this year’s results, and Manjaro has some exciting news for PinePhone backers.

  • Playing "Teeny Titans 2"

    I love "Teen Titans GO," even if I am a grown up adult human male with teenagers. So, when I saw this in my Play Store suggested list, I could not resist. I mean, come on! So, I downloaded it, installed it, and began playing. 

Nordic Semi nRF52832 Powered PineTime Dev Kit is Now Available for $24.99

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Development
GNU
Linux
Gadgets

PineTime was announced as a $25 smartwatch & companion for PinePhone Linux smartphone which itself sells for $150.

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GNU: Guile 2.9.6 (Beta) and GCC 10's C++20 "Spaceship Operator"

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GNU
  • GNU Guile 2.9.6 (beta) released

    We are delighted to announce GNU Guile 2.9.6, the sixth beta release in preparation for the upcoming 3.0 stable series. See the release announcement for full details and a download link.

    This release fixes bugs caught by users of the previous 2.9.5 prerelease, and adds some optimizations as well as a guile-3 feature for cond-expand.

  • GCC 10's C++20 "Spaceship Operator" Support Appears To Be In Good Shape

    The C++20 spaceship operator support was merged in early November for GCC 10. The commits this week meanwhile allow the operator to be used with std::pair and std::array, among other related commits in recent weeks.

    See the GCC C++ status page for the state of C++20/C++2A with GCC 10. Most C++20 functionality is already in place even on GCC 8/9 but some pieces remain around atomic compare-and-exchange with padding bits, modules support, coroutines, using enum, and more implicit moves.
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Screencasts and Shows: SparkyLinux 2019.12, Linux Mint 19.3 Beta, Destination Linux and More

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GNU
Linux
  • SparkyLinux 2019.12 Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at SparkyLinux 2019.12.

  • Linux Mint 19.3 "Tricia" Beta First Impressions

    Linux Mint 19.3 is coming soon! In this video I take a quick look at the beta that was recently released, in preparation for the review I'll be uploading as soon as the final version is released.

  • Destination Linux 150 - Librem 5, Zorin OS, Private Internet Access, UBports, Fedora, Bitwarden

    Topics covered in this episode:

    ZorinOS Privacy Concerns
    Ubuntu Touch Runs On Raspberry Pi
    Librem 5 Birch Has Shipped
    Fedora Users Concerned GNOME Software Proprietary Software
    Linux Powered Handheld Returns

  • Linux Apps I Use Daily

    In this video, I go over all the Linux distributions and apps that I use every single day. I could not imagine my life without any of this software.

  • 411 DevSecOps: Karthik Gaekwad | Jupiter Extras 37

    Ell and Wes sit down with Karthik Gaekwad to sort through the buzzword bingo and explain what DevSecOps is, what it isn’t, and why security should be part of the full lifecycle of your apps.

  • Imaginary Turkey | User Error 80

    Talking to ourselves, delicious family meals, and the complexities of modern work.

    Plus inexpensive acquisitions, the price we put on security, and popey refusing to answer the simplest of questions.

  • LHS Episode #315: The Weekender XXXVIII

    It's time once again for The Weekender. This is our bi-weekly departure into the world of amateur radio contests, open source conventions, special events, listener challenges, hedonism and just plain fun. Thanks for listening and, if you happen to get a chance, feel free to call us or e-mail and send us some feedback. Tell us how we're doing. We'd love to hear from you.

Gammy – Adaptive screen brightness utility for Linux

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GNU
Linux
Software

All technology enthusiasts heartily greeted smartphones when they came around. Not only because it was all futuristic and attractive, but also because now you could do things that you could only do on your desktop or laptop.

E-mailing, text messaging, sharing files, all became much easier. Even though it seems like smartphones are given features based on those possessed by notebooks, they have a world of their own. Now, even the computer world is learning things from smartphones.

One such feature of smartphones that we all find helpful is automatic brightness adjustment. Having that on our Linux systems will be great, especially for those who move around with their laptops a lot. We present a program just for that task, Gammy.

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Linux For All Shines on LXDE Desktop

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GNU
Linux

Linux For All very well could be a unifying Linux distribution that provides a common computing platform.

LFA is a distro developed by Sweden-based software engineer Arne Exton of Exton Linux, the same developer who distributes ExTix Linux. The Swedish Linux Society hosts 16 Exton distributions.

The Exton Linux inventory of distributions is a fertile repository of custom distros you will not find elsewhere. Among Exton Linux releases are an assortment of customized Linux distros based on a wide family of options such as Arch, Debian, Ubuntu, Puppy and Slackware. Multiple versions of these distros offer an even wider range of desktops.

The ExTix distro, which I recently reviewed, is perhaps one of the best known of Exton's Linux platforms. That is in part due to its multiple desktop offerings.

Linux For All comes in just one flavor, the LXDE environment. However, LXDE is an inviting option that eliminates confusion and complexity in favor of a powerful desktop that is lightweight enough to run on low-powered aging hardware.

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Get started with Lumina for your Linux desktop

For a good number of years, there was a desktop operating system (OS) based on FreeBSD called PC-BSD. It was intended as an OS for general use, which was noteworthy because BSD development mostly focuses on servers. For most of its life, PC-BSD shipped with the KDE desktop by default, but the more KDE came to depend on Linux-specific technology, the more PC-BSD migrated away from it. PC-BSD became Trident, and its default desktop is Lumina, a collection of widgets written to use the same Qt toolkit that KDE is based upon, running on the Fluxbox window manager. You may find the Lumina desktop in your Linux distribution's software repository or in BSD's ports tree. If you install Lumina and you're already running another desktop, you may find yourself with redundant applications (two PDF readers, two file managers, and so on) because Lumina includes a few integrated applications. If you just want to try the Lumina desktop, you can install a Lumina-based BSD distribution in a virtual machine, such as GNOME Boxes. Read more

Android Leftovers

10 Best Linux Log File Management Tools

Log file management is essential for apps, operating systems, servers, and anything software related. Realistically, there are some specific file management best practices that are fundamental, and tools which tend to make the process easier while outpacing the rest. We’ll briefly explore ten of these tools in this writing. Linux and Unix require log management that’s as convenient as possible for best server management. Servers are the core of many businesses in terms of technology, and different businesses have different needs. From Papertrail to Lnav to LOGalyze, there are plenty of worthwhile options. Find those that best fit your business and needs of its tech personnel. Read more