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China Plans to Replace Windows Completely with UOS

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

China is planning to replace the US-based Windows operating system completely this year by a Linux based operating system called UOS.

UOS a.k.a Unified Operating System is a Linux based homegrown OS (desktop and server) right in China. It is said to be developed to run all hardware, chips made in China for their own purpose. Based on the popular Linux distribution Deepin, it is reported that UOS has made significant progress recently to boot up in 30 seconds in common hardware.

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Looking back at LibrePlanet 2020: Freeing the future together

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GNU

On March 14 and 15, the Free Software Foundation (FSF) held LibrePlanet 2020: Free the Future online. The virtual edition of LibrePlanet was nothing short of a success, and it was quite a journey to get there.

Looking back to a week before the conference, we had an incredible lineup, exciting plans, and more new program elements than we've ever had before. With a new logo designed by campaigns intern Valessio Brito, a refresh to the LibrePlanet 2020 Web site, renewed focus on using the LibrePlanet wiki to collaborate, and with a new home at the Back Bay Events Center, we were ready to receive hundreds of free software supporters in Boston for another successful conference. And then everything changed.

Our in-person event suffered the consequences of the global COVID-19 pandemic, forcing us to make the difficult decision of bringing LibrePlanet 2020 online in order to protect our supporters, staff, and all the many interrelated communities. There was no time to pause and mourn: instead, the FSF team put our heads together fast and charted a new direction.

Within the scope of five days, we were able to move the conference from an in-person experience to a live streaming event, thanks to the heroic efforts of our talented tech team, our volunteers, and the flexibility and cooperation of our scheduled speakers, even some previously unscheduled ones. We hosted three sessions at a time for both days of the conference, bringing viewers thirty-five streamed talks from forty-five speakers, as well as eight lightning talks. Technical difficulties were few and far between, and when one of our speakers asked how many nations were tuning in, within the span of eighteen seconds, twelve countries were identified.

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Modern GNU/Linux Systems Should Run Old Games: Open Source Community

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GNU
Linux
OSS

LibrePlanet 2020 ended on a high note with its second conference on 15 March 2020. There were a lot of things that were discussed in the online conference. However, one topic of discussion at the conference was centered on gaming on GNU/Linux systems.

Developer Dennis Payne tried to look back and pointed out that Modern GNU/Linux no longer runs “older” free software games.

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ARM9 in 2020 – Meet Microchip SAM9X60 SoC & Evaluation Kit

Filed under
Development
GNU
Linux
Hardware

In my first job, I wrote code for a MIPS processor for VoIP phones, then I switched to NEC/Renesas MCUs for CD and DVD players, before going back to Linux and my first experience with an Arm processor: Cirrus Logic EP9307 with a single ARM9 (ARM920T) core clocked at 200 MHz. That was in 2005, and according to Wikipedia various ARM9 cores were released between 1998 to 2006, and now such cores are not recommended for new IC designs with most companies now building their chips around Arm Cortex-A/M/R cores.

At the end of last year, we wrote about Banana Pi BPI-F2S SBC based on Sunplus SP7021 “Plus1” quad-core Cortex-A7 processor with ARM9 and 8051 co-processor. Odd enough but at least the ARM9 core is not the main processor, however, while looking at the upcoming Linux 5.6 Linux kernel log I read an entry about a new SAM9X60 ARM926-based SoC from Microchip.

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Kubernetes 1.18: Fit & Finish

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GNU
Linux
Server
OSS

We’re pleased to announce the delivery of Kubernetes 1.18, our first release of 2020! Kubernetes 1.18 consists of 38 enhancements: 15 enhancements are moving to stable, 11 enhancements in beta, and 12 enhancements in alpha.

Kubernetes 1.18 is a “fit and finish” release. Significant work has gone into improving beta and stable features to ensure users have a better experience. An equal effort has gone into adding new developments and exciting new features that promise to enhance the user experience even more. Having almost as many enhancements in alpha, beta, and stable is a great achievement. It shows the tremendous effort made by the community on improving the reliability of Kubernetes as well as continuing to expand its existing functionality.

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There is No “Linux” Platform (Part 2)

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GNU
Linux
GNOME

The problems outlined in Part 1 are of course not new, and people have been working on solutions to them for a long time. Some of these solutions have really started to come together over the last few years, empowering the people making the software to distribute it directly to the people using it.

Thanks to the work of many amazing people in our community you can now develop an app in GNOME Builder, submit it to Flathub, get it reviewed, and have it available for people to install right away. Once it’s on there you can also update it on a schedule you control. No more waiting 6 months for the next distribution release!

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Screencasts/Audiocasts/Shows: Archman 2020.03, Linux Headlines, FLOSS Weekly and mintCast

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Archman 2020.03 "GNOME" overview | Fast, visual, stable and easy.

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of Archman 2020.03 "GNOME" and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • 2020-03-25 | Linux Headlines

    LLVM 10 arrives with improvements for RISC-V and WebAssembly, the latest version of Swift improves package management and focuses on developer productivity, Cloudflare makes some impressive performance upgrades to Linux disk encryption performance, and Plasma Bigscreen aims to provide a voice-controlled smart TV interface powered by KDE and Mycroft.

  • FLOSS Weekly 571: Agones

    Agones is an open-source, multiplayer dedicated game server scaling and orchestration platform, that can run anywhere Kubernetes can run. You can orchestrate game servers, integrate any engine, and monitor a servers' metrics.

  • mintCast 331 – The Art of Tracking

    First up, in our Wanderings, Leo upgrades TLP, Tony Hughes tinkers with LMDE, Manjaro fights with Moss, Josh gets cancelled, and Joe works from home.

    Then, in the news, NPM gets acquired, OBS adds a number, Purism and Pinebook have new releases, Basilisk takes us back in time, and Gnome gets new features.

    In security, Edge is coming, and it’s worse than we thought.

Asus Vivobook - Long in the tooth, going strong

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux
Hardware

For a brief while, I did ponder reinstalling the system from scratch, but then decided against it. The problems I encountered were small (if annoying), and I was able to resolve them quickly. The system works well, it's fast enough. Not bad for a 2013 laptop that was made to be frugal to begin with. Now ideally, there should be no niggles and no upgrade ghosts, but there you have it. As far as the road test goes, I had everything I needed in strange and foreign places, and the Vivobook + Plasma did their job dutifully.

I will probably follow up with one or two more articles of this nature in the future. I'm not sure how extensively I'm going to be using the Ultrabook, but then, its age will be an interesting factor to reckon with. My older laptops are handling the brunt of passing years fairly well, but they were also in a higher cost category when new. With this machine in the mid-price range, I don't really know how things are going to evolve. That's about it for now. The end.

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Spanish software to computerize healthcare in Cameroon and India

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GNU

In several rural Africa, a patient's medical history is reduced to a piece of paper. If the form is lost, the data is finished. Computerizing health centers would improve patient care and management of the services offered. Incorporate the technology to these poor databases It would help to obtain statistics and detect epidemics or spikes in diseases, in addition to guaranteeing better patient care due to monitoring, evolution, optimization of resources and extraction of statistical data. With this premise, the program developed by GNU Health, the NGO chaired by Luis Falcón. This Spanish computer engineer and doctor has installed free healthcare software as a tool for healthcare staff to improve the living conditions of their communities in countries such as Cameroon, India, Pakistan or Laos.

"Traditional health management systems focus on the disease, which generates reactive and reductionist medicine," argues the expert. «GNU Health has a multidisciplinary approach, with the disease prevention as main tools. It contains multiple indicators of social determinants of health, at the individual, family and society levels. Nutrition, educational level, family functionality are some of the many variables that we have to take into account if we want to improve the quality of life and health of our society. The latest technology in MRI is of little use to us if we do not end smoking, obesity or gender violence," he explains.

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Tips To Fight Coronavirus, If It Was A File In Linux World

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GNU
Linux

The novel Coronavirus (Covid-19) has been spreading over most countries in the world and forcing people to remain inside. But a Linux user is not a real Linux user if he/she doesn’t use the situation to learn new things about the Linux command line while being quarantined in home.

Today, we are taking you in a little funny post on small tips & commands that you can use to fight Covid-19, had it been a file in the Linux world on your machine.

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Android Leftovers

Widora TINY200 Allwinner F1C200s ARM9 Development Board Support DVP Camera, Up to 512MB SD NAND Flash

Widora TINY200 is a tiny ARM9 development board equipped with Allwinner F1C200s with a DVP camera interface compatible with OV2640 / 5640 sensor, an audio amplifier, and various storage options from a 16MB SPI flash to a 512MB SD NAND flash. I first heard about the processor when I wrote about Microchip SAM9X60 ARM9 SoC last month, and some people noted there were other fairly new ARM9 SoCs around such as Allwinner F1C200s that also includes 64MB RAM so you can run Linux without having to connect external memory chips. Read more

Open Hardware and Devices With GNU/Linux

  • Instaclock | The Magpi 92
  • [Old] BrailleBox: Android Things Braille news display

    To create the six nubs necessary to form Braille symbols, Joe topped solenoids with wooden balls. He then wired them up to GPIO pins of the Pi 3 via a breadboard.

  • Sending my alerts directly to the keyboard

    As I learned while making this blog post, custom drivers are not always the best way to add custom functionality to USB devices on Linux, sometimes there are pre existing APIs that can make adding functionality a lot easier.

    Despite me ending up not using a custom USB driver in the final version, it was still quite interesting to play around with, if for no other reason than I now have another trick up my sleeve for future projects.

    And now thanks to my keyboard, I will never miss alerts again.

  • Onlykey review

    There’s a sort of soft rubber case around the key, you can get all kinds of colors (I just stuck with black). It also comes with the handy little carribeener to attach it to your keychain or whatever. So, once you have the firmware somewhat up to date, you can run the app. It will also update firmware as long as it’s not too old. The firmware is open source: https://github.com/trustcrypto/OnlyKey-Firmware On your first run (or if you factory wipe it), you have to do a bit of setup. You can enter 2 profile pins (sequences of buttons). They suggest that this might be ‘work’ and ‘home’, but you could use them for whatever you like. You can also enter a ‘self destruct’ profile pin, which wipes back to factory settings if you enter it. You can also tell it to do this if someone enters the wrong pin 10 times, but it will flash red and stop taking input after 3 failed pins. So to wipe it this way you have to enter 3 wrong pins, remove, insert, 3 more wrong pins, remove, insert 3 more wrong pins, remove, insert, 1 more wrong pin. You can also load a firmware called the “International Travel Edition” that has no encryption at all (it’s only protected by the pin).

  • Widora TINY200 Allwinner F1C200s ARM9 Development Board Support DVP Camera, Up to 512MB SD NAND Flash

    Widora TINY200 is a tiny ARM9 development board equipped with Allwinner F1C200s with a DVP camera interface compatible with OV2640 / 5640 sensor, an audio amplifier, and various storage options from a 16MB SPI flash to a 512MB SD NAND flash. I first heard about the processor when I wrote about Microchip SAM9X60 ARM9 SoC last month, and some people noted there were other fairly new ARM9 SoCs around such as Allwinner F1C200s that also includes 64MB RAM so you can run Linux without having to connect external memory chips.

  • Librem 5 January 2020 Software Update

    January saw development take off again after the end-of-year break, and following on from the Chestnut shipment of the Librem 5. Some of the activities below were already mentioned in their own articles in Purism’s news archive; others will be covered in more depth in future articles. This is just a taste of all the work that goes into making the Librem 5 software stack. You can follow development more closely at source.puri.sm.

  • ESP32-S2-Saola-1 Development Board is Now Available for $8

    Espressif ESP32-S2 WiFi SoC mass production started at the end of February 2020, and soon enough we started to find ESP32-S2 SoC and modules for $1 to $2 on sites like Digikey, but so far we had not seen ESP32-S2 development boards for sale. The good news is the breadboard-friendly ESP32-S2-Saola-1 development board has started to show up for $8 on resellers such as Mouser and Digikey albeit with a lead time of 8 to 12 weeks.

Georges Basile Stavracas Neto: This Month in Mutter & GNOME Shell | March 2020

During March, GNOME Shell and Mutter saw their 3.36.0 and 3.36.1 releases, and the beginning of the 3.38 development cycle. We’ve focused most of the development efforts on fixing bugs before starting the new development cycle. From the development perspective, the 3.36.0 release was fantastic, and the number of regressions relative to the massive amount of changes that happened during the last cycle was remarkably small. Read more