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GNU

There is No “Linux” Platform (Part 2)

Filed under
GNU
Linux
GNOME

The problems outlined in Part 1 are of course not new, and people have been working on solutions to them for a long time. Some of these solutions have really started to come together over the last few years, empowering the people making the software to distribute it directly to the people using it.

Thanks to the work of many amazing people in our community you can now develop an app in GNOME Builder, submit it to Flathub, get it reviewed, and have it available for people to install right away. Once it’s on there you can also update it on a schedule you control. No more waiting 6 months for the next distribution release!

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Screencasts/Audiocasts/Shows: Archman 2020.03, Linux Headlines, FLOSS Weekly and mintCast

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Archman 2020.03 "GNOME" overview | Fast, visual, stable and easy.

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of Archman 2020.03 "GNOME" and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • 2020-03-25 | Linux Headlines

    LLVM 10 arrives with improvements for RISC-V and WebAssembly, the latest version of Swift improves package management and focuses on developer productivity, Cloudflare makes some impressive performance upgrades to Linux disk encryption performance, and Plasma Bigscreen aims to provide a voice-controlled smart TV interface powered by KDE and Mycroft.

  • FLOSS Weekly 571: Agones

    Agones is an open-source, multiplayer dedicated game server scaling and orchestration platform, that can run anywhere Kubernetes can run. You can orchestrate game servers, integrate any engine, and monitor a servers' metrics.

  • mintCast 331 – The Art of Tracking

    First up, in our Wanderings, Leo upgrades TLP, Tony Hughes tinkers with LMDE, Manjaro fights with Moss, Josh gets cancelled, and Joe works from home.

    Then, in the news, NPM gets acquired, OBS adds a number, Purism and Pinebook have new releases, Basilisk takes us back in time, and Gnome gets new features.

    In security, Edge is coming, and it’s worse than we thought.

Asus Vivobook - Long in the tooth, going strong

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux
Hardware

For a brief while, I did ponder reinstalling the system from scratch, but then decided against it. The problems I encountered were small (if annoying), and I was able to resolve them quickly. The system works well, it's fast enough. Not bad for a 2013 laptop that was made to be frugal to begin with. Now ideally, there should be no niggles and no upgrade ghosts, but there you have it. As far as the road test goes, I had everything I needed in strange and foreign places, and the Vivobook + Plasma did their job dutifully.

I will probably follow up with one or two more articles of this nature in the future. I'm not sure how extensively I'm going to be using the Ultrabook, but then, its age will be an interesting factor to reckon with. My older laptops are handling the brunt of passing years fairly well, but they were also in a higher cost category when new. With this machine in the mid-price range, I don't really know how things are going to evolve. That's about it for now. The end.

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Spanish software to computerize healthcare in Cameroon and India

Filed under
GNU

In several rural Africa, a patient's medical history is reduced to a piece of paper. If the form is lost, the data is finished. Computerizing health centers would improve patient care and management of the services offered. Incorporate the technology to these poor databases It would help to obtain statistics and detect epidemics or spikes in diseases, in addition to guaranteeing better patient care due to monitoring, evolution, optimization of resources and extraction of statistical data. With this premise, the program developed by GNU Health, the NGO chaired by Luis Falcón. This Spanish computer engineer and doctor has installed free healthcare software as a tool for healthcare staff to improve the living conditions of their communities in countries such as Cameroon, India, Pakistan or Laos.

"Traditional health management systems focus on the disease, which generates reactive and reductionist medicine," argues the expert. «GNU Health has a multidisciplinary approach, with the disease prevention as main tools. It contains multiple indicators of social determinants of health, at the individual, family and society levels. Nutrition, educational level, family functionality are some of the many variables that we have to take into account if we want to improve the quality of life and health of our society. The latest technology in MRI is of little use to us if we do not end smoking, obesity or gender violence," he explains.

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Tips To Fight Coronavirus, If It Was A File In Linux World

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The novel Coronavirus (Covid-19) has been spreading over most countries in the world and forcing people to remain inside. But a Linux user is not a real Linux user if he/she doesn’t use the situation to learn new things about the Linux command line while being quarantined in home.

Today, we are taking you in a little funny post on small tips & commands that you can use to fight Covid-19, had it been a file in the Linux world on your machine.

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[Stay at Home] Free Online Communication Tools for Ubuntu GNU/Linux Users

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

To dear readers, in the emergency of COVID-19 widespread disease, we all needed to keep staying at home but in fact we still need to communicate with people. For that purpose, I listed here several free & popular communication tools everybody can use on Ubuntu with short guidances in using them. They are email & mailing list, IRC webchat, Telegram, and Jitsi Meet. They are all gratis and quick to use and I myself using them for online teaching and reaching people out there. Stay safe and be healthy!

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New Screencasts: Parrot OS 4.8 and Manjaro 19.0 Kyria KDE Edition

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Parrot OS 4.8 KDE Home Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at Parrot OS 4.8 KDE Home.

  • Manjaro 19.0 Kyria KDE Edition – Features KDE Plasma 5.17 and Powered by Linux Kernel 5.4

    Manjaro 19 KDE Edition ships with the latest version KDE plasma 5.17. The themes have been updated including new “light” and “dark” versions within the Breath2 theme. In addition, KDE 19.12.2 packages and applications have been included.

    Manjaro 19 offering Office Suite Freeoffice 2018 by SoftMaker during installation. Bauh, the graphical package manager now supports Snaps, Flatpaks, Appimage and the Arch AUR. This means that Manjaro users now have three choices of application installation in the GUI.

Audiocasts/Shows: LINUX Unplugged, TWIL, Linux Headlines, Linux in the Ham Shack and Command Line Heroes

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • The One-Click Trap | LINUX Unplugged 346

    We debate the dangers and advantages of one-click deployments. Then Dan from elementary OS shares an AppCenter for Everyone update.

    Plus a big batch of feedback that kicks off some wide-ranging discussions.

  • This Week in Linux 98: Relieving Quarantine Boredom, OBS, Linux Mint, KaiOS, & Purism’s Librem Mini

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we’re going to cover a lot of great news like the latest release of OBS Studio, Mozilla is teaming up with KaiOS, System76 announced they’re going to be making a Keyboard and Linux Mint’s LMDE 4 was Released this week. We’re also going to check out some ideas that the community came up with for what to do while in Club Quarantine. We’ll also check out a new project related to Linux Printing, called PAPPL. (just rolls right off the tounge) Later in the show, we’re going to discuss a few controversial topics. Purism announced a new product called the Librem Mini and it’s been met with mixed reactions. Microsoft announced some news related to WSL2 and that they are buying, npm, a very sizeable package manager for the JavaScript programming language. All that and much more on Your Weekly Source for Linux GNews!

  • 2020-03-24 | Linux Headlines

    Mozilla partners with Scroll for a premium ad-free browsing experience, Tor and Tails release key security fixes, Magisk 20.4 launches with MagiskHide disabled by default, and Python is looking for user feedback to improve pip.

  • LHS Episode #334: GNURadio Deep Dive

    Welcome to Episode #334 of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this deep dive episode, we have a special guest, Derek Kozel, MW0LNA, who takes the hosts and everyone else on a wild ride into the internals of GNURadio. Somehow by the end it all starts to make sense. Learn about SDR, hardware design, DSP, audio path simulation and much more in this informative episode and look for the companion YouTube video to follow. Thanks for listening. We hope you enjoy. Stay safe out there.

  • [S4:E5] Command Line Heroes: Smarter Phones

Cartesi Launches Linux Infrastructure For Developing Blockchain DApps

Filed under
Development
GNU
Linux
Software

“We are excited to be launching the first-ever Linux infrastructure that runs on top of a blockchain, while we complete our second round of funding,” says Cartesi CEO Erick de Moura. “Blockchains and decentralization will allow for a new exciting range of applications, but with the current state of DApps, the space is very limited, making it very difficult for mainstream adoption. So, we are striving to create serious change and increase the viability of DApp development on top of a blockchain.”

Currently, it is possible to develop directly on the blockchain, but the process is complex, lengthy, and the applications are left with very limited computational capabilities. As blockchain moves out of the shadows and into mainstream consciousness; programming and developing infrastructure must adapt to the new technology for other, non-crypto purposes.

Cartesi brings all the tools and capabilities available in modern operating systems to the decentralized web. The company’s solution provides a legitimate and fully-fledged Linux OS that magnifies the capabilities of decentralized applications without compromising on the security guarantees of blockchain. Cartesi enables programmers to code decentralized applications seamlessly, while maintaining the appeal of mainstream web apps. Moreover, Cartesi will reduce the barrier of entry for mainstream developers and veterans, by eliminating the need to learn new programming languages and domain-specific tools that often present limitations and a steep learning curve.

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Also: The shelves may be empty, but the disk is full: Not even Linux can resist the bork at times

UCS 4.4-4: Fourth Point Release of UCS 4.4

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

We’ve just published the 4th point release of UCS 4.4: apart from bug fixes and some patches, we added some cool new features and improved numerous apps. For example, UCS 4.4-4 introduces logging of LDAP authentications, something that was previously only available via Samba 4. Our developers also put some work into the AD Connector (enhanced security, performance and compatibility), the Univention App Center and the UCS portal login screen. Read on to find out more about the most important innovations.

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More in Tux Machines

How to Install Latest Java 14 in Ubuntu 18.04, 20.04, Linux Mint

Oracle Java 14 is released. And here's how you can download and install in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, 19.10 and Linux Mint 18.x, 19.x. Read more

IBM/Red Hat Leveraging COVID-19 for Marketing

  • Automation against the COVID-19 crisis: 4 suggestions to get started

    Without public cloud computing, we wouldn't be able to face the pandemic in the way we are. On-premise data centers have never scaled this fast, and not even the most rigorous capacity planning in the world would have forecasted the resource consumption we face today. News outlets covering the outbreaks would have not been able to cope with an entire planet constantly refreshing the home page in the hope of reading good news (that’s what I do). Hospitals and research facilities publishing dashboards full of virus spread statistics would not have been able to acquire the massive datasets they have as fast as they did. Videoconferencing and streaming platforms wouldn’t be able to serve, exceptionally so far, the enormous amount of the human workforce suddenly forced to work from home. And what is public cloud computing in the end? An astonishing, unprecedented, disciplined, methodical, pervasive amount of automation (and a few other, equally critical things). Automation doesn’t just allow us to cope with the urgency and scale of the demand in the public cloud and inside our data centers. Automation is helping organizations around the world to transition to a work-from-home productivity model. Without automation, the security teams would be hard pressed to install VPN clients across millions of laptops, tablets and smartphones all around the world.

  • UNESCO CodeTheCurve global virtual hackathon: Build your skills and help make a difference

    At least 1.5 billion young people are currently at home due to school closures relating to the global COVID-19 pandemic. One hundred eighty-three countries have been disrupted. Students, parents, and communities continue to cope with social isolation, while exploring how to maintain a sense of normalcy with the sea of online learning content, collaboration tools, and social media platforms available for the world to consume. Conversations that once took place face-to-face have now moved virtual. For students, parents, teachers, educators, and others, home confinement has brought the additional attention and need for an innovative learning paradigm, one centered on practical and real-world digital skills. This is a time that’s especially challenging for the 49% of the global population who lack access to broadband internet. For those who are online, the spread of misinformation and disinformation relating to COVID-19 complicates the situation even further by diminishing confidence in public health guidance by authorities, and has given rise to panic and uncertainty.

i.MX8M Mini Pico-ITX board has a DSP for voice control plus optional AI

Estone’s “EMB-2237-AI” Pico-ITX SBC integrates a “SOM-2237” module that runs Linux on an i.MX8M Mini and adds a DSP for audio. The carrier adds LAN with PoE, MIPI-DSI and -CSI, mics and speakers, and an M.2 slot with Edge TPU AI support. Estone Technology’s EMB-2237-AI is the first SBC we’ve seen to combine the 100 x 72mm Pico-ITX form-factor with an NXP i.MX8M Mini SoC. Other Mini-based SBCs include Seco’s SBC-C61, Boardcon’s sandwich-style EM-IMX8M-MINI, and Garz & Fricke’s recent Tanaro, among others. Read more

Python Programming

  • Python 2.7.18rc1

    Python 2.7.18 release candidate 1 is a testing release for Python 2.7.18, the last release of Python 2.

  • Python 2.7.18 release candidate 1 available

    A first release candidate for Python 2.7.18 is now available for download. Python 2.7.18 will be the last release of the Python 2.7 series, and thus Python 2.

  • Python Software Foundation: Python Software Foundation Fellow Members for Q1 2020

    Congratulations! Thank you for your continued contributions. We have added you to our Fellow roster online. The above members have contributed to the Python ecosystem by teaching Python, creating education material, contributing to circuitpython, contributing to and maintaining packaging, organizing Python events and conferences, starting Python communities in their home countries, and overall being great mentors in our community. Each of them continues to help make Python more accessible around the world. To learn more about the new Fellow members, check out their links above. Let's continue to recognize Pythonistas all over the world for their impact on our community. The criteria for Fellow members is available online: https://www.python.org/psf/fellows/. If you would like to nominate someone to be a PSF Fellow, please send a description of their Python accomplishments and their email address to psf-fellow at python.org. We are accepting nominations for quarter 2 through May 20, 2020.

  • How to Make an Instagram Bot With Python and InstaPy

    What do SocialCaptain, Kicksta, Instavast, and many other companies have in common? They all help you reach a greater audience, gain more followers, and get more likes on Instagram while you hardly lift a finger. They do it all through automation, and people pay them a good deal of money for it. But you can do the same thing—for free—using InstaPy! In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to build a bot with Python and InstaPy, which automates your Instagram activities so that you gain more followers and likes with minimal manual input. Along the way, you’ll learn about browser automation with Selenium and the Page Object Pattern, which together serve as the basis for InstaPy.

  • Sending Encrypted Messages from JavaScript to Python via Blockchain

    Last year, I worked with the Capacity team on the Crypto stamp project, the first physical postage stamp with a unique digital twin, issued by the Austrian Postal Service (Österreichische Post AG). Those stamps are mainly intended as collectibles, but their physical "half" can be used as valid postage on packages or letters, and a QR code on that physical stamp links to a website presenting the digital collectible. Our job (at Capacity Blockchain Solutions) was to build that digital collectible, the website at crypto.post.at, and the back-end service delivering both public meta data and the back end for the website. I specifically did most of the work on the Ethereum Smart Contract for the digital collectible, a "non-fungible token" (NFT) using the ERC-721 standard (publicly visible), as well as the back-end REST service, which I implemented in Python (based on Flask and Web3.py). The coding for the website was done by colleagues, of course using JavaScript for the dynamic elements.

  • Unpacking in Python: Beyond Parallel Assignment

    Unpacking in Python refers to an operation that consists of assigning an iterable of values to a tuple (or list) of variables in a single assignment statement. As a complement, the term packing can be used when we collect several values in a single variable using the iterable unpacking operator, *. Historically, Python developers have generically referred to this kind of operation as tuple unpacking. However, since this Python feature has turned out to be quite useful and popular, it's been generalized to all kinds of iterables. Nowadays, a more modern and accurate term would be iterable unpacking. In this tutorial, we'll learn what iterable unpacking is and how we can take advantage of this Python feature to make our code more readable, maintainable, and pythonic. Additionally, we'll also cover some practical examples of how to use the iterable unpacking feature in the context of assignments operations, for loops, function definitions, and function calls.

  • Spin the table: Solution!