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Google ignores licence-violating clones of VLC

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Cloned versions of the popular VideoLAN media player, better known as VLC, with ads embedded and in violation of the VLC licence, have been residing on the Google Play Store for a long time with the search company doing nothing about them, it is claimed.

The website Torrent Freak reported that a clone of VLC, named 321 Media Player, had been downloaded between five and ten million times and earned a 4.5 score from 101,000 reviews.

A second clone, known as Indian VLC Player, has more than 500,000 downloads.

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ExTiX 18.2 with Deepin 15.5 Desktop, Refracta snapshot, Calamares 3.1.9 Installer and kernel 4.15.1-exton – Build 180206

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I’ve released a new version of ExTIX 18.2 Deepin today with Calamares 3.1.9 installed from source and kernel 4.15.1-x86_64-exton. Calamares is an installer framework. By design it is very customizable, in order to satisfy a wide variety of needs and use cases. All packages have been updated to the latest available version as of today. Study all installed packages in ExTiX Deepin Build 180206.

About ExTiX 18.2 with the Deepin 15.5 Desktop
I’ve made a new extra version of ExTiX with Deepin 15.5 Desktop (made in China!). Deepin is devoted to providing a beautiful, easy to use, safe and reliable system for global users. Only a minimum of packages are installed in ExTiX Deepin. You can of course install all packages you want. Even while running ExTiX Deepin live. I.e. from a DVD or USB stick. Study all installed packages in ExTiX Deepin.

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Peppermint 8 Respin-2 Released

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Team Peppermint are pleased to announce the latest iteration of our operating system ISO images Peppermint 8 Respin-2. This is a security refresh of the Peppermint 8 ISO images to include all updates to date (as of 3rd Feb 2018), including the Meltdown and Spectre mitigations such as the new HWE kernel 4.13.0-32 and the latest Chromium web browser version 64. The new ISO also contains bug fixes for flash content in ICE SSB’s, and Chromium not remembering user selected xdg-open preferences for magnet and mailto links..
There is no need for Peppermint 8 or Peppermint 8 (first) Respin users to reinstall this version, the mitigations and bug fixes have already been pushed as automatic updates to the earlier Peppermint 8 versions.

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GTK: GTK+ Hackfest and WebKitGTK+

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  • GTK+ Hackfest 2018

    As some of you may know, we had a GTK+ Hackfest on February 1st and 2nd in Brussels, Belgium. Matthias has already blogged and blogged again about the two days and detailed notes about all the things we discussed can be found here and here. He also has some nice pictures.

    From everything we discussed I'm mostly looking forward to migrating to GitLab so I can file a few GTK+4 bugs and mark quite a few of them as blockers for a 4.0 release. I hope this will happen as soon as possible since there are quite a few usability regressions in current gtk+ master compared to gtk3 and those need time to get ironed out.

  • WebKitGTK+ 2.19.90 released!
  • WebKitGTK+ 2.19.90 Adds Graphics ARIA Rolls, Horizontal Scroll Shortcut

    Released in time for this week's GNOME 3.28 beta milestone is the WebKitGTK+ 2.19.90 release as the GNOME platform port of the WebKit layout engine.

    WebKitGTK+ 2.19.90 has several notable changes ahead of its upcoming WebKitGTK+ 2.20 stable release. WebKitGTK+ 2.19.90 now has WebSockets communication respecting system proxy settings, the context menu is now shown via a long-press gesture, and there is support for Shift + mouse scroll for scrolling horizontally. There is also a zoom gesture fix.

10 Best Linux Desktop Environments And Their Comparison

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Linux is all about what you want and having it from the ocean of free and open source software. The same applies while performing a comparison of desktop environments as they comprise of different applications and a GUI via which the user interacts with the operating system. Just like a plethora of Linux-based free operating systems, are many options available and our list of best Linux desktop environment and their comparison includes the likes of KDE, Cinnamon, Xfce, GNOME, etc.

The Linux world is full of open source software. You have the option of choosing from hundreds of distributions and customize them as per your will. No one slaps you with a copyright even if you change the source code of a distro to fork your Linux distro and release it with a new name. That’s the beauty of free software and open source. Only one thing the creators may ask you is to give them proper credits because they have also invested their efforts and time. Well, that’s a different story.

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Elementary OS Juno will be version 5.0, not 0.5

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A new version of elementary OS arrives in the spring, and when it does it’ll have a number of significant new features and changes on offer.

Among them a small yet appreciable bump to the version number. Yes elementary OS 0.5 Juno will actually be elementary OS 5.0.

Previous releases of elementary OS are numbered 0.1, 0.2 and so on, with 0.4 being the most recent release. That trend won’t continue hereon-in; the next elementary OS release will in fact be version 5.0, and not 0.5 as many had expected.

Why the switch?

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GNU: FreeIPMI 1.6.1 and GNU Hurd Update

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  • FreeIPMI 1.6.1 Released With Performance Improvements, Better IPv6 Support

    Albert Chu of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory announced the release this weekend of FreeIPMI, the GNU project implementing Intelligent Platform Management Interface v1.5/2.0 support.

    This in-band/out-of-band IPMI software features many improvements with its v1.6.1 milestone.

  • GNU Hurd Hardware Support Remains In Very Rough Shape For 2018

    Yesterday at FOSDEM 2018 Hurd developer Samuel Thibault talked about the work done on this GNU kernel for a PCI arbiter to allow different user-land drivers to access PCI devices concurrently. During this PCI arbiter talk he also went over the current state of the hardware support and recent achievements for GNU Hurd.

    Sadly, the hardware state is pretty much the same as what he summarized two years ago at FOSDEM. GNU Hurd remains mainly focused on i686 kernel support, their 64-bit kernel can now boot but overall is in rough shape, their layer for getting network cards working remains based off the Linux 2.6.32 drivers, there is IDE and AHCI driver support for SATA, preliminary sound support through the userland Rump, etc.

GNOME/GTK: Librsvg, BuildStream, GTK, GStreamer

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  • rsvg-bench - a benchmark for librsvg

    Librsvg 2.42.0 came out with a rather major performance regression compared to 2.40.20: SVGs with many transform attributes would slow it down. It was fixed in 2.42.1. We changed from using a parser that would recompile regexes each time it was called, to one that does simple string-based matching and parsing.

    When I rewrote librsvg's parser for the transform attribute from C to Rust, I was just learning about writing parsers in Rust. I chose lalrpop, an excellent, Yacc-like parser generator for Rust. It generates big, fast parsers, like what you would need for a compiler — but it compiles the tokenizer's regexes each time you call the parser. This is not a problem for a compiler, where you basically call the parser only once, but in librsvg, we may call it thousands of times for an SVG file with thousands of objects with transform attributes.

    So, for 2.42.1 I rewrote that parser using rust-cssparser. This is what Servo uses to parse CSS data; it's a simple tokenizer with an API that knows about CSS's particular constructs. This is exactly the kind of data that librsvg cares about. Today all of librsvg's internal parsers work using rust-cssparser, or they are so simple that they can be done with Rust's normal functions to split strings and such.

  • BuildStream Hackfest and FOSDEM

    I also wanted to sum up a last minute BuildStream hackfest which occurred in Manchester just a week ago. Bloomberg sent some of their Developer Experience engineering team members over to the Codethink office in Manchester where the whole BuildStream team was present, and we split up into groups to plan upcoming coding sprints, land some outstanding work and fix some bugs.

  • builders

    An idiom that has shown up in GTK4 development is the idea of immutable objects and builders. The idea behind an immutable object is that you can be sure that it doesn’t change under you, so you don’t need to track changes, you can expose it in your API without having to fear users of the API are gonna change that object under you, you can use it as a key when caching and last but not least you can pass it into multiple threads without requiring synchronization.
    Examples of immutable objects in GTK4 are GdkCursor, GdkTexture, GdkContentFormats or GskRenderNode.

  • GTK+ hackfest, day 2

    The second day of the GTK+ hackfest in Brussels started with an hour of patch review. We then went through scattered items from the agenda and collected answers to some questions.

  • GTK+ 4.0 Targeted For Its Initial Release This Fall, GTK+ 5.0 Development To Follow

    A few days back I wrote about how GTK+ 4.0 is being talked about for release this year and now a bit more specific timeline is in place.

    The past few days prior to FOSDEM in Brussels was a GTK+ hackfest. Among the items discussed when not banging on code was a GTK+ 4.0 road-map and coming out of this event in Belgium is a more solid understanding now that the initial GTK+ 4.0 release will be targeted for the fall of this year. There isn't any firm release plan at this time but at GUADEC (taking place in Spain this summer) they will revisit their plans to verify they can still ship this fall.

  • GStreamer has grown a WebRTC implementation

    Late last year, we at Centricular announced a new implementation of WebRTC in GStreamer. Today we're happy to announce that after community review, that work has been merged into GStreamer itself! The plugin is called webrtcbin, and the library is, naturally, called gstwebrtc.

    The implementation has all the basic features, is transparently compatible with other WebRTC stacks (particularly in browsers), and has been well-tested with both Firefox and Chrome.

  • GStreamer Lands A WebRTC Plugin

    The GStreamer multimedia framework now has mainline support for WebRTC.

    WebRTC is the set of protocols/APIs for real-time audio/video communication over peer-to-peer connections. WebRTC is supported by all major web browsers and more while now there is support within GStreamer too.

Glibc 2.27 and everything you didn't know about FSFE in a picture

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  • Glibc 2.27 Released With Many Optimizations, Support For Static PIE Executables

    Being released right on time is Glibc 2.27, version 2.27 of the GNU C Library.

    As we have been covering the past few months, exciting us a lot about Glibc 2.27 are many performance optimizations with a number of functions receiving AVX/FMA tuning and other performance tweaks particularly for x86_64. But even on the ARM64/AArch64 side are also some performance optimizations as well as for POWER and SPARC.

  • GNU C Library 2.27 released

    The GNU C Library version 2.27 is now available.

    The GNU C Library is used as *the* C library in the GNU system and in GNU/Linux systems, as well as many other systems that use Linux as the kernel.

  • Everything you didn't know about FSFE in a picture

    As FSFE's community begins exploring our future, I thought it would be helpful to start with a visual guide to the current structure.

    All the information I've gathered here is publicly available but people rarely see it in one place, hence the heading. There is no suggestion that anything has been deliberately hidden.

Purism Librem 5 Update

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  • Purism Might Develop An X11-Free Wayland Compositor Aligned With GNOME

    Yesterday we heard of Purism's plans to support desktop diversity but by default for their Librem 5 smartphone they will likely be using GNOME in order to maintain a unified experience across their devices. The latest now is they might develop a new Wayland compositor in line with GNOME.

    Purism's mobile development lead, Nicole Faerber, posted a new blog entry today about their latest progress... It mostly comes down to saying the Cortex-A53 CPU cores as used by the NXP i.MX8 SoC isn't affected by Spectre/Meltdown, they still are committed to the i.MX8 plan, they are trying to acquire i.MX6QuadPlus developer boards for early use until i.MX8 availability, they are engaging with both KDE and GNOME, and Qualcomm's possible acquisition of i.MX owner NXP isn't of concern at this point to Purism.

  • Librem 5 Phone Progress Report

    Lately, news headlines have been packed with discussions about critical CPU bugs which are not only found in Intel CPUs, but also partially in AMD CPUs and some ARM cores. At the same time, some of our backers have voiced concerns about the future of NXP in light of a potential acquisition by Qualcomm. Therefore you might be wondering, “Will the Librem 5 be affected by these bugs too?” and “will the Purism team get the i.MX 8 chips as planned?”, so let’s address those questions now.

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME Desktop Schedule Published

  • GNOME 3.29.x Development Series
    GNOME 3.29.x is an unstable development series intended for testing and hacking purposes. GNOME uses odd minor version numbers to indicate development status, so this unstable 3.29.x series will become the official 3.30 stable release. There are many ways you can get involved.
  • GNOME 3.30 Scheduled For Release On 6 September
    Following this month's successful launch of GNOME 3.28, the release team has now assembled the schedule for the GNOME 3.30.0 release and the 3.29 development milestones. GNOME 3.29.1 is the first step towards GNOME 3.30 and will be released on 19 April followed by GNOME 3.29.92 a month later on 24 May. For June is then GNOME 3.29.3 and GNOME 3.29.4 on 19 July.
  • GNOME 3.30 "Almeria" Desktop Environment Slated for Release on September 6, 2018
    The GNOME Project announced today the availability of the official release schedule for the next major release of their widely-used GNOME desktop environment for GNU/Linux distributions. While most of the Linux community hasn't yet managed to install the recently released GNOME 3.28 desktop environment on their favorite GNU/Linux distributions, the GNOME developers are already focusing on the next major release, GNOME 3.30, which was slated for release this fall on September 6, 2018.

Super long-term kernel support

In the longer-term, CIP is looking toward IEC-62443 security certification. That is an ambitious goal and CIP can't get there by itself, but the project is working on documentation, test cases, and tools that will hopefully help with an eventual certification effort. Another issue that must be on the radar of any project like this is the year-2038 problem, which currently puts a hard limit on how long a Linux system can be supported. CIP is working with kernel and libc developers to push solutions forward in this area. Read more

LibreSSL 2.7.1 Released, OpenSSH 7.7 Being Tested

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