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Top 5 Linux pain points in 2017

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Although this issue continues to improve as more supported hardware is deployed, many users indicate that they still have issues with UEFI and/or secure boot. Using a distribution that fully supports UEFI/secure boot out of the box is the best solution here.

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TheSSS 23.0

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • TheSSS 23.0 available for download.

    This is a major release based on the 4MLinux Server 23.0, meaning that the components of the LAMP server are now: Linux 4.9.52, Apache 2.4.28, MariaDB 10.2.9, and PHP (5.6.31 and 7.0.24). Webmin has been updated to the version 1.850. Much improved support for SCSI, RAID and LVM devices is now available out of the box. And finally, the biggest change is related to the installation script, which now makes it possible to install TheSSS on ext2, ext3, ext4, reiserfs, jfs, xfs, btrfs, and nilfs2 partitions.

  • The Smallest Server Suite Updated with Better Support for SCSI and RAID Devices

    4MLinux developer Zbigniew Konojacki‏ is informing us today on the release and immediate availability for download of version 23.0 of his TheSSS (The Smallest Server Suite) lightweight and open-source Linux OS.

    Based on the upcoming 4MLinux 23.0 operating system, TheSSS 23.0 release is here to upgrade its LAMP (Linux, Apache, MariaDB and PHP) components to new versions, and it's now powered by Linux kernel 4.9.52 LTS, Apache 2.4.28, MariaDB 10.2.9, as well as both the newer PHP 7.0.24 and the older PHP 5.6.31 for compatibility.

    The latest Webmin 1.850 web-based system configuration tool is included as well in this major release of TheSSS, which comes with an updated installation script that lets users install the Linux-based server OS on various popular file systems, including Btrfs, EXT2, EXT3, EXT4, XFS, ReiserFS, JFS, and NILFS2.

GIMP, More Awesome Than I Remember

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GNU

For what seems like decades, GIMP (Graphic Image Manipulation Program) has been the de facto standard image editor for Linux. It works well, has many features, and it even supports scripting. I always have found it a bit clumsy, however, and I preferred using something else for day-to-day work. I recently had the pleasure of sitting at a computer without an image editor though, so I figured I'd give GIMP another try on a non-Linux operating system. See, the last time I tried to use GIMP on OS X, it required non-standard libraries and home-brew adding. Now, if you head over to the GIMP site, you can download a fully native version of GIMP for Windows, OS X and Linux.

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DockerCon EU, Containers and Chromebooks

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Surprise Announcement Changes Container Landscape at DockerCon EU
  • Containers And Chromebooks: The Future Of Chrome OS

    Last month, I penned my thoughts on what the future of Chrome OS could look like and how devices like the Pixelbook could play a big part in the implementation of containers on Chromebooks. Running non-native apps on top of the Chrome operating system without the need for hacky workarounds would be a monumental watershed for Google who has now tossed a hat in the ring to capture their share of the consumer PC market.

    Virtual Machines, like VMWare, aren’t new and as a third-party solution work very well. However, the development we have been tracking goes well beyond a traditional, web-based solution. The work being done here seems to remove the third-parties and eliminate a browser by creating a built-in container system that can run, in theory, any app the hardware will support.

Android, Android on Desktops (Android-x86), Samsung Galaxy on Desktop/DeX

Filed under
Android
GNU
Linux
  • Pixel 2 Has Screen Burn-In Problem, Google Says They’re “Actively Investigating” The Report

    Android Central has reported that their Pixel 2 XL review unit is having screen burn-in issues. That’s a bad thing for the latest made-by-Google flagship which was announced earlier on October 4, ditching the headphone jack.

  • Android-x86 7.1-rc2 Now Supports NVMe SSDs, Better QEMU VirGL

    The Android-x86 project derived from Google's Android Open-Source Project code-base remains officially at Android 6.0, but there is an Android 7.1 "Nougat" build available for testing.

    Quietly released earlier this month was a second release candidate based on Android 7.1. The Android-x86 7.1-RC2 release is based on upstream AOSP 7.1-RC2 / Nougat-MR2 along with some extra improvements for this x86-targeted build.

  • What To Do When The Power Button Of Your Android Phone Is Broken?
  • Samsung is adding Linux support for DeX with the new ‘Linux on Galaxy’ app

    Since Samsung debuted the DeX feature earlier this year with the Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ smartphones, the company has been making small changes to improve the whole experience of using your smartphone as a PC. In order to further enhance Samsung DeX, the company has announced “Linux on Galaxy”, an app that will let developers run Linux-based distributions on their mobile device, allowing them to code on-the-go. The app is DeX-enabled, which means developers can code on a bigger device, powered by their Galaxy S8, Galaxy S8+ or Galaxy Note8.

  • You can run any Linux distro on Samsung smartphones using Linux with Galaxy App

    The convergence of a smartphone with a PC/laptop is not new and has been in making for several years. In fact, the idea of such a convergence started with Nokia’s Communicator phone launched in 1996 when it was the undisputed king of feature phone and mobile phone arena.

    Ubuntu devs tried a similar theme with the now-dead Ubuntu for smartphones and tablets. The Ubuntu os was launched with the idea to run full Linux apps on your smartphone. The smartphone even gave users an option to connect a keyboard, mouse, and display. However, that did not sell.

Purism Librem 5 Linux Smartphone Campaign Set To End At Around $2 Million

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Tomorrow marks the end of the crowdfunding campaign for Purism's Librem 5 smartphone campaign.

The campaign is looking like it will close at around two million dollars with the current tally as of this morning being at $1,962,517 in funds raised for this effort to build an original GNU/Linux smartphone stack with either GNOME Shell or KDE Plasma Mobile comprising the UI/UX elements.

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Success! Beelink S1 Running Linux – Courtesy of the Open Source Community

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

We recently published a post summarizing why the Beelink S1’s hardware specs look so promising for an inexpensive Linux mini PC. But I hit a brick wall when trying to install any flavour of Linux on the machine. I simply could not get the machine to boot a live Linux distro, either from a USB DVD or USB key.

I contacted Shenzhen AZW Technology Co. Ltd., the manufacturer of the Beelink S1, twice to see if they could offer any support. They replied recommending I get used to running Windows 10, as they contend Ubuntu is difficult to install on this mini PC. The second email has yet to elicit a response. I must have exhausted my support quota. Undeterred, I made a call for help to Linux enthusiasts. And half a dozen good folk promptly stepped forward to offer a simple solution, which I’ll detail below. This is one reason why I love Linux; the community.

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GNU/Linux on Desktop/Phone: System76, DeX, Librem

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GNU
Linux
  • Pop!_OS Is Finally Here — System76’s Ubuntu-based Operating System For Developers

    The first ever stable release of Pop!_OS is finally here. You can go ahead and download it from this link. Don’t forget to share your feedback. Earlier this year in June, we reported that System76 is creating its own Linux distro called Pop!_OS.

  • Samsung DeX Promises to Bring the Linux PC Experience to Your Mobile Device

    After unveiling its next-generation Bixby 2.0 intelligent assistant, Samsung today announced that it plans to bring the Linux PC experience to the Samsung DeX ecosystem.

  • Steps toward a privacy-preserving phone

    What kind of cell phone would emerge from a concerted effort to design privacy in from the beginning, using free software as much as possible? Some answers are provided by a crowdfunding campaign launched in August by Purism SPC, which has used two such campaigns successfully in the past to build a business around secure laptops. The Librem 5, with a five-inch screen and radio chip for communicating with cell phone companies, represents Purism's hope to bring the same privacy-enhancing vision to the mobile space, which is much more demanding in its threats, technology components, and user experience.

    The abuse of mobile phone data has become a matter of worldwide concern. The capture and sale of personal data by apps is so notorious that it has been covered in USA Today; concerns over snooping contribute to the appeal of WhatsApp (which has topped 1.3 billion users) and other encrypted and privacy-conscious apps. But apps are only one attack vector. I got in touch with Todd Weaver, founder and CEO of Purism, to find out what the company is doing to plug the leaks in mobile devices.

An update on GnuPG

Filed under
GNU
Security

The GNU Privacy Guard (GnuPG) is one of the fundamental tools that allows a distributed group to have trust in its communications. Werner Koch, lead developer of GnuPG, spoke about it at Kernel Recipes: what's in the new 2.2 version, when older versions will reach their end of life, and how development will proceed going forward. He also spoke at some length on the issue of best-practice key management and how GnuPG is evolving to assist.

It is less than three years since attention was focused on the perilous position of GnuPG; because of systematic failure of the community to fund its development, Koch was considering packing it all in. The Snowden revelations persuaded him to keep going a little longer, then in the wake of Heartbleed there was a resurgent interest in funding the things we all rely on. Heartbleed led to the founding of the Core Infrastructure Initiative (CII). A grant from CII joined commitments from several companies and other organizations and an upsurge in community funding has put GnuPG on a more secure footing going forward.

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Intel Linux and GCC Work

Filed under
Development
GNU
Linux
  • Intel Begins Landing GFNI Support In GCC 8

    Intel compiler engineers have begun landing "GFNI" support within the GNU Compiler Collection as one of the new ISA extensions not expected until the Icelake processor debut.

  • Control-Flow Enforcement Technology Begins To Land In GCC 8

    Intel Control-flow Enforcement Technology (CET) support has begun landing within the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) for this code safety feature.

    Patches have been in the works for several months while now the start of the patches are being merged to mainline. Coincidentally, at the same time Intel is also landing their GFNI instruction patches in GCC as well.

  • Intel Continues Landing New i915 DRM Features For Linux 4.15

    Jani Nikula has sent in another drm-intel-next update for David Airlie's DRM-Next tree. They continue prepping more updates to their Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) for targeting the upcoming Linux 4.15 cycle.

    There have already been several Intel "i915" DRM driver updates queued in DRM-Next for this new kernel version. Past pulls have included marking Coffeelake graphics as stable, continued Cannonlake "Gen 10" graphics enablement, various display improvements, and quite a lot of other low-level code improvements.

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