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GNU/Linux in Ukraine: A Look Back and a Glimpse into the Future

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Failure to understand the very concept of free software (e.g., “How can it be any good if it’s free?” or “Unless you get for free something that otherwise costs a lot of money, it must not be worth anything”) as well as the prevalence of Windows and resistance to learning something new are the principal reasons why GNU/Linux had trouble getting a foothold in Ukraine for a while. One’s thinking would typically go as follows: “What is the point of downloading some confusing operating system if I can install the trusty – and also free – Windows which is so familiar after two decades of using it (never mind that it is pirated)? No learning new tricks for this ol’ dog! I do not want to try new things! Those who say that the other operating system is superior in some ways can keep it, as I am very content with what I have, thank you very much!”

Despite this inauspicious beginning, the attitude toward GNU/Linux recently began to change, albeit slowly. The “Revolution of Dignity” – which is how the surge of popular resistance that toppled the corrupt regime of Victor Yanukovych came to be known – was a watershed moment. Following the Revolution of Dignity, Ukraine chose a European vector of development and opened up to new opportunities. People began to change. In the past, hardly anybody bothered to think that not littering or being courteous toward one another was the right thing to do, or that all people were equal, and no one was inferior because of one’s skin color, creed, or sexual orientation, among others. Now, one can see palpable evidence that democratic and liberal values are being internalized and are slowly beginning to shape people’s attitudes.

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Also: Windows Users Switching To Linux | Unleaded Hangout

Spaghetti Code Strikes Again

Manjaro 17.0.4 released (G, K, X)

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Manjaro Gellivara was a great release! Now we are proud to announce v17.0.4, our hopefully final release of Gellivara. We found some issues with our graphical package managers and installer, the shipped Mesa-Stack in combination with KDE and decided therefore to fix those with a new release of our ISOs. These ISOs also include all other updates from today’s stable release.

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Zorin OS 12.2 Released – Our Most Advanced Operating System Ever

Filed under
GNU
Linux

We’re pleased to announce the release of Zorin OS 12.2. This version brings new innovations from the Open Source community together with a familiar user interface, requiring nearly no learning curve for PC users. We have focused on refining the desktop environment and core technologies, readying the system for new classes of users seeking a faster, more powerful, and secure computing experience.

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Programming: Python, DevSecOps Skills Gap, Go Programming, Java EE, GNU Tools Cauldron and GnuCOBOL

Filed under
Development
GNU
  • Improving security through data analysis and visualizations

        

    My last tip is that in recent years, there have been a lot of new tools that make designing nice visualizations much easier. In fact, many really prevent you from creating the disasters that you’d find here: https://www.reddit.com/r/dataisugly/. If you are a Python user, you really should take a look at Seaborn, YellowBrick, and Altair as they are all really impressive libraries.

  • The DevSecOps Skills Gap
  •  

  • How I learned Go Programming

    Go is a relatively new programming language, and nothing makes a developer go crazier than a new programming language, haha! As many new tech inventions, Go was created as an experiment. The goal of its creators was to come up with a language that would resolve bad practices of others while keeping the good things. It was first released in March 2012. Since then Go has attracted many developers from all fields and disciplines.

  • Must go faster, must go faster! Oracle lobs Java EE into GitHub, vows rapid Java SE releases

    Oracle plans to accelerate the pace of Java SE releases – and has moved Java EE's code repository to GitHub in keeping with its avowed desire to step back from managing the beast.

    Java SE has been on a two-year release cycle. That's no longer fast enough, according to Mark Reinhold, chief architect of Oracle’s Java platform group.

    Java competes with other platforms that get updated more often, he explained.

  • GNU Tools Cauldron 2017 Kicks Off Tomorrow

    The annual GNU Tools Cauldron conference focused around the GNU compiler toolchain will kickoff tomorrow, 8 September, in Prague.

  • GnuCOBOL 2.2 Released To Let COBOL Code Live On As C

    For those of you still maintaining COBOL code-bases, GnuCOBOL 2.2 is now available as what was formerly OpenCOBOL and also the project's first stable release in nearly one decade.

    GnuCOBOL has been living under the GNU/FSF umbrella for a few years while today's GnuCOBOL 2.2 release is the first stable release since OpenCOBOL 1.1 back in 2009. (Since then was the GnuCOBOL 1.1 release, but just for renaming the project.)

  • GnuCOBOL 2.2 released

    Version 2.2 of the GNU COBOL compiler is out. Changes include a relicensing to GPLv3, a set of new intrinsic functions, a direct call interface for C functions, and more.

Gentoo-Based Porteus Kiosk 4.5 Debuts with EAPoL Support, Linux Kernel 4.12

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gentoo

Tomasz Jokiel from Porteus Solutions announced the release of the Gentoo-based Porteus Kiosk 4.5 operating system designed for web terminals, which brings numerous improvements, updated components, and new functionality.

First and foremost, Porteus Kiosk 4.5.0 bumps the Linux kernel version from the long-term supported Linux 4.9 series, which was used in the previous release, to the Linux 4.12 branch, shipping with Linux kernel 4.12.10 by default, thus adding an extra layer of hardware support to the free and open-source kiosk operating system for public access computers.

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Arch Linux 2017.09.01 Is Available for Download, Powered by Linux Kernel 4.12.8

Filed under
GNU
Linux

A new month, a new ISO snapshot of the popular Arch Linux operating system sees the light of day, offering newcomers or those who want to deploy the OS on new systems an up-to-date installation medium.

Arch Linux 2017.09.01 is the Arch Linux ISO snapshot for September 2017, powered by the Linux 4.12.8 kernel, incorporating all the software updates and security patches, as well as other tweaks that have been released through the official repositories of the GNU/Linux distribution during the entire month of August 2017.

It's the most up-to-date Arch Linux installation medium, and you should download it if you want to deploy the operating system on new hardware or you want to reinstall your broken Arch Linux OS without having to download hundreds of updates from the repositories after the installation.

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Ditching Apple and Microsoft for GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
Mac
  • Switching to xmonad + Gnome – and ditching a Mac

    I have been using XFCE with xmonad for years now. I’m not sure exactly how many, but at least 6 years, if not closer to 10. Today I threw in the towel and switched to Gnome.

    More recently, at a new job, I was given a Macbook Pro. I wasn’t entirely sure what to think of this, but I thought I’d give it a try. I found MacOS to be extremely frustrating and confining. It had no real support for a tiling window manager, and although projects like amethyst tried to approximate what xmonad can do on Linux, they were just too limited by the platform and were clunky. Moreover, the entire UI was surprisingly sluggish; maybe that was an induced effect from animations, but I don’t think that explains it. A Debisn stretch install, even on inferior hardware, was snappy in a way that MacOS never was. So I have requested to swap for a laptop that will run Debian. The strange use of Command instead of Control for things, combined with the overall lack of configurability of keybindings, meant that I was going to always be fighting muscle memory moving from one platform to another. Not only that, but being back in the world of a Free Software OS means a lot.

  • Google is trying to poach Microsoft Azure partners by sending them free Chromebooks
  • Google’s Cloud Team Is Sending Chromebooks To Microsoft Partners

     

    Microsoft has its Azure platform, Amazon has AWS, Google is entering the arena with Google Cloud and each company is throwing serious money to grab a slice of this market as it continues to expand.

  • Windows loses the market share growth battle against Linux [Ed: Almost no site (that I've stumbled upon) mentions that the firm behind these numbers is Microsoft-connected. Microsoft sites like this one say Windows "market share collapsed from 90.45% to 88.77%." But no, it's more like 50%. ChromeOS, Android etc. are conveniently unaccounted for.]

    In August, Windows dropped to a 90.70% market share from 91.45% from July, despite Microsoft’s effort. This drop of 0.75% is the biggest one that the operating system had recorded since April 2016. Back then, the OS’s market share collapsed from 90.45% to 88.77%.

GNU Linux-Libre 4.13 Kernel Launches Officially for Those Who Seek 100% Freedom

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Alexandre Oliva, the maintainer of the GNU Linux-libre project, an Open Source initiative to provide a 100% free version of the Linux kernel to those who seek 100% freedom, announced the release of the GNU Linux-libre 4.13 kernel.

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10 Things to Consider When Switching to a Linux Smartphone OS

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Because it’s a key component in the Android operating system (OS), Linux remains crucial to the mobile landscape. However, while Android employs a Linux kernel, it’s far from just another Linux distribution.

But Linux for mobile devices offers a completely different experience. Learn why Linux mobile is a great option, as well as drawbacks to switching from your favorite mobile OS.

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Also: ‘Librem 5’, Purism plans to develop Linux-based security-focused smartphones

Best New Linux Desktop Environments

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Most Linux users have their own desktop environment preference. For example, I enjoy using MATE, where other users I talk with get a lot of value out of XFCE, GNOME or KDE. Yet it surprised me when I asked my Linux using friends what they thought of some of the "newer" Linux desktop environments.

About half of these Linux users have never tried any desktop environment outside of the ones mentioned above. Because of this, I thought it would be interesting to compare the best new Linux desktop environments making a name for themselves.

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Also: Windows 10 S review: Microsoft's OS for students is hard to love

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With their lacklustre approach to free software, German public services remain behind other European member states, says the Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE). When asked, the current governing parties’ say they support free software, but their statements are contradicted by the lack of action, the advocacy group says. In early September, the FSFE published its analysis of the free software policies put forward by the main political parties on the ballot, in preparation for Germany’s parliamentary elections on 24 September. This analysis (in German) is far more detailed than an earlier report generated by the Digital-O-Mat, a web portal set up to focus on political parties’ positions on 12 digital topics. Read more New release: ISA² interoperability test bed software v1.1.0

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