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GNU

Linux-based networking SBC features five GbE ports and optional SFP

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

Gateworks has launched a rugged, headless “Newport GW6400” SBC that runs Linux on a dual- or quad-core Cavium OcteonTX with 3x mini-PCIe, 2x USB 3.0, 5x GbE ports (2x with PoE) and optional SFP.

Last November, Gateworks announced a new product family of rugged Newport SBCs that run OpenWrt or Ubuntu on Cavium’s dual or quad-core ARMv8.1 Octeon TX networking SoCs. The debut model was a 105 x 100mm GW6300 SBC. Now, Gateworks has followed up with the promised high-end, 140 x 100mm Newport GW6400 model, which has 5x Gigabit Ethernet ports instead of 3x on the GW6300. Later this year we’ll see a GW6100 with a single gigabit port and a GW6200 with 2x GbE.

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'Proper' GNU/Linux Software on Chrome OS

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GNU
Linux
Google
  • A closer look at Chrome OS using LXD to run Linux GUI apps (Project Crostini)

    Project Crostini is the Chrome OS project to add support to run Linux GUI apps on Chrome OS.

    The components that facilitate Project Crostini can be found at https://github.com/lstoll/cros-crostini That page has instructions for those that wanted to enable the running of Linux GUI apps on Chrome OS, when Project Crostini was still under development. Lincoln Stoll dissected the source of Chrome OS and created a helpful list of the involved repositories.

    The basic component is The Chrome OS Virtual Machine Monitor (crossvm), which runs untrusted operating systems through Linux’s KVM interface. The Linux distribution would run in a VM. The test repositories make reference to the X server, XWayland and Wayland. There is a repository called sommelier, which is a nested Wayland compositor with X11 forwarding support. It needs more searching to figure out where the source code ended into the Chrome OS repository and what is actually being used.

    Update #1: Here are the vm_tools in Chrome OS. They include garcon, a service that gets added in the container and communicates with another service outside of the container (vm_concierge).

    What is important, is that LXD runs in this VM and is configured to launch a machine container with a Linux distribution. We are going in depth into this.

  • Linux On Chromebooks Now Official

    Among other news from Google I/O 2018, Google is making it possible to code on Chromebooks. Whether it’s building an app or writing a quick script, Chromebooks will be available for coding projects.

  • Android apps on Chromebooks can finally access SD card storage

    It’s been nearly two years since Google started rolling out a feature that lets you run Android apps on Chromebooks. And while Android support has come a long way, there’s one thing Android apps couldn’t do on Chromebooks… until now: access an SD card.

    But starting with the latest Chrome OS beta, it looks like Android apps on Chromebooks can access the SD card… although it seems like the feature is still very much a work in progress.

Is It Linux or GNU/Linux?

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GNU
Linux

After putting this question to the experts, the conclusion is that no matter what you call it, it's still Linux at its core.

Should the Linux operating system be called "Linux" or "GNU/Linux"? These days, asking that question might get as many blank stares returned as asking, "Is it live or is it Memorex?"

Some may remember that the Linux naming convention was a controversy that raged from the late 1990s until about the end of the first decade of the 21st century. Back then, if you called it "Linux", the GNU/Linux crowd was sure to start a flame war with accusations that the GNU Project wasn't being given due credit for its contribution to the OS. And if you called it "GNU/Linux", accusations were made about political correctness, although operating systems are pretty much apolitical by nature as far as I can tell.

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GNU/Linux on Laptops: Chrome OS and Pop_OS

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GNU
Linux
  • Chrome OS Now Supports Linux Apps, But Only On Google Pixelbook

    In a stunning new development, Chrome OS now supports full-fledged Linux apps, with a preview available beginning May 8 for Google Pixelbook users.

    Being able to run Linux is a drastic addition to Chrome OS, Google's proprietary operating system, which up until now has only supported web-based Chrome apps and Android apps. The arrival of Linux marks the first time Chrome OS will be able to run full desktop applications.

    As VentureBeat reports, Chrome OS product management director Kan Liu says users can use Linux-based tools, editors, and integrated development environments on a Chromebook, and the installation process is similar to that on a typical Linux machine.

  • Cats and dogs living together, Linux on Chromium, mass hysteria ...

    First we find out that Microsoft's best selling server is running on Linux and now you will be able to run Debian flavoured Linux apps such as Linux terminal, Git, Sublime, Vim and Android Studio on the Pixelbook.  This should help bridge the gap between Chromium and its far more popular and capable sibling, Android.  According to The Inquirer, Google expects this to be a seamless integration without requiring extra steps to launch the apps.  Perhaps one day we will see these two OSes start to combine as both Microsoft and Google seem to have noticed the unpopularity of skinny versions of their operating systems.

  • System76 Galago Pro Linux laptop now has two screen size options

    Just yesterday, we shared the news that System76 had refreshed its popular Oryx Pro laptop. The Linux community was abuzz with excitement over the thinner and faster notebook. After all, it offers a lot of horsepower at a very affordable price. Heck, the battery life has even doubled compared to its predecessor!

    The computer seller is apparently not ready to slow down, however, as today it also refreshes its affordable and svelte Galago Pro Linux ultrabook. What's particularly exciting about the new model is that it has two screen sizes -- 13 inch HiDPI or 14 inch 1080p (in matte). Regardless of which you choose, the overall dimensions stay the same. How can that be, you ask? Well, for the 14 inch model, the bezels are just thinner.

GNU, GCC and FSF

Filed under
GNU
  • Intel's Clear Linux Moving For A Quick Rollout Of GCC 8

    Intel's performance-oriented Clear Linux operating system is already preparing to ship GCC 8.1 as the default compiler and over the days ahead will be rebuilding all of their packages under GCC8.

    GCC 8.1 was released last week and as of today their rolling-release distribution will be shipping GCC 8.1 as the default compiler along with having rebuilt the Linux kernel, Glibc, and other key packages against this major GNU compiler update. They intend to rebuild the whole distribution over the weekend with this new compiler release.

  • CodeSourcery Has Ported OpenMP / OpenACC To AMD GCN GPUs With GCC

    While we have seen AMD GCN and HSA support in the past for the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) we have unfortunately not heard of it being used much, but now CodeSourcery / Mentor Graphics has been working on a new/updated AMD GCN port for execution on Radeon GPUs that allows for OpenMP and OpenACC offloading.

    Andrew Stubbs of CodeSourcery has completed work on a GCN3/GCN5 port for running OpenMP/OpenACC offloaded kernels on the likes of AMD Fiji and Vega graphics cards. They are using the GCC compiler although for now rely upon LLVM for the AMDGPU Assembler and Linker support with there being no AMD GCN support currently in GNU Binutils.

  • Friday Free Software Directory IRC meetup time: May 11th starting at 12:00 p.m. EDT/16:00 UTC

    Join the FSF and friends Friday, May 11th, from 12:00 p.m. to 3 p.m. EDT (16:00 to 19:00 UTC) to help improve the Free Software Directory, with this week's theme of working on music software.

GNU/Linux on Laptops: System76 and Chromebooks

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GNU
Linux

You have GNU sense of humor! Glibc abortion 'joke' diff tiff leaves Richard Stallman miffed

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Development
GNU

Late last month, open-source contributor Raymond Nicholson proposed a change to the manual for glibc, the GNU implementation of the C programming language's standard library, to remove "the abortion joke," which accompanied the explanation of libc's abort() function.

Nicholson said: "The joke does not provide any useful information about the abort() function so removing it will not hinder use of glibc."

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System76 launches a 4.4 pound Linux laptop with 6-core Intel CPU, NVIDIA graphics (Oryx Pro)

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GNU
Linux

Linux computer maker System76 launched its first laptops with 8th-gen Intel Core processors last year. Those computers featured quad-core, 15 watt processors based on Intel’s Kaby Lake Refresh architecture. But now System76 is taking pre-orders for a laptop that packs much more power.

The updated System76 Oryx Pro features an Intel Core i7-8750H hexa-core, 45 watt processor and support for up to NVIDIA GeForce 1070 graphics.

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CCNY faculty and student to learn how Pixar works its magic

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GNU
Linux
Movies

Laisa Barro says “Studying Computer Science and Art allows me to combine my creative and technical skills in unique and innovative ways. As a Production Support Engineer intern at Pixar, I’ll have the opportunity to apply those skills while working with almost every group at the studio to help diagnose and problem-solve issues for users on GNU/Linux-based desktop platforms."

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Best Free Photoshop Alternative: GIMP

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GNU

Adobe Photoshop is a household name, and is widely regarded as one of, if not THE best photo editing and image manipulation suites around.

Basically, it's an industry leader, and if you work in a professional industry that relates to photography, publishing, design or any other simiar creative sphere, chances are it takes centre stage.

It's useful in a non-professional capacity too, however, being a much more powerful editing suite than things like Microsoft Paint.

But the problem is, it's expensive. You have to buy Adobe Photoshop and it costs a fair bit to do so. Hardly surprising that quite a few alternative software packages have emerged over the years for those on a budget, or for those who don't want to pay a penny.

For this article I could have quite easily put together a list of multiple different free alternatives to Adobe Photoshop, however, from my years of dabbling with what's available there's only one I can really say is worth bothering with - Gnu Image Manipulation Program, aka GIMP.

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More in Tux Machines

GNU/Linux on the Desktop Versus Proprietary Forms

  • Why I use a Mac computer, but an Android phone
    Yes, you could use a flavour of Linux on cheaper hardware, but then you trade the great Mac graphical interface with the ones available to Linux. You can fight me in the comments, but deep down you know I’m right. MacOS comes with Bash, and many of the tools those familiar with Linux would expect to have by default in their favourite distribution, including basics like “whois”, which aren’t installed in Windows by default.
  • Everything you knew about Chromebooks is wrong
    The original assumed vision of the Chromebook platform was a laptop and operating system capable of running only the Chrome web browser. You could do anything you wanted, as long as you wanted to stay on the web at all times. Today, the best new Chromebooks can runs apps from three additional operating systems. Not only do Chromebooks run apps, but they run more apps without dual- or multi-booting than any other computing platform. Chromebooks can run apps from Android, Linux and Windows concurrently in the same session.
  • Games, Tests and GitLab CI
    We are getting midterm of the GNOME 3.30 development cycle and many things already happened in the Games world. I will spare the user facing news for later as today I want to tell you about development features we desperatly needed as maintainers: tests and continuous integration. TL;DR: GLib, Meson, Flatpak and GitLab CI make writing and running tests super easy!

Graphics: Vulkan and Vega M

  • Vulkan Virgl Has Kicked Off For Supporting This Graphics/Compute API Within VMs
    Of the hundreds of projects for this year's Google Summer of Code, there are many interesting GSoC 2018 projects but one of those that I am most excited for is Vulkan-Virgl for getting this modern API supported with hardware acceleration by guest virtual machines. As implied by the name, this effort is based upon the Virgl project started by David Airlie and originally tasked with getting OpenGL acceleration to guest VMs using a fully open-source Linux driver stack. Virgl has been in good shape for a while now with OpenGL, while this summer the hope is to get the Vulkan API support going for opening up VMs to using this high-performance graphics and compute API.
  • AMDVLK Driver Lands Half-Float Additions, Many Other Improvements
    There's been another weekly-ish public code push to the AMDVLK open-source AMD Vulkan Linux driver stack and this time around it's heavy on feature work. There has been a fair amount of changes pertaining to half-float (FP16) support including support for the AMD_gpu_shader_half_float extension, prepping for VK_AMD_gpu_shader_half_float_fetch, FP16 interpolation intrinsics and register settings, and more.
  • Vega M Graphics On Intel Kabylake G CPUs Are Beginning To Work Under Linux
    We have been covering the Linux driver upbringing of "Vega M" for the Vega/Polaris graphics found in select newer Intel "Kabylake G" processors. The code is still in flight before it will work in all released versions of the Linux driver components, but for those willing to build the code or rely upon third party repositories, Vega M is now working on Linux. As I have covered in various past articles, the open-source driver support for Radeon Vega M is queued into DRM-Next for the upcoming Linux 4.18 kernel cycle, Mesa 18.1 albeit with new hardware I always recommend using the latest Git (current Mesa 18.2), and there are also binary GPU microcode files needed too.

Plasma 5.13 – Amazing Tux, How Sweet Plasma

Plasma 5.13 is (going to be) a very nice release. It builds on the solid foundation that is the LTS edition, and adds cool, smart touches. The emphasis is on seamless integration of elements, which is what separates professionals from amateurs. It’s all around how the WHOLE desktop behaves, and not individual programs in isolation. And Plasma is making great strides, offering a polished version of an already mature and handsome product, with extra focus on fonts, media and browser connectivity and good performance. There are some rough patches. Apart from the obvious beta issues, those goes without saying, KDE Connect ought to be a true multi-phone product, the network stack really needs to be spotless, and that means full Microsoft Windows inter-operability, Spectacle should allow for configurable shadows and alpha channel, and I want to see if the decorative backend has been cleaned up, i.e. can you search and install new themes and icons without encountering useless errors and inconsistencies. But all in all, I’m quite impressed. The changes are big and noticeable, and above all, meaningful. You don’t just get features for the sake of it, you get things that improve the quality and consistency of the desktop, that maximize fun and productivity, and there’s deep thought in orchestrating it all together. It ain’t just a random bunch of options that happen to work. I like seeing patterns in things, and I’m happy when there’s functional harmony. This spring season of distro testing hasn’t been fun, and Plasma 5.13 is balm for my weary wrists, so hurting from all that angry typing. More than worth a spin, and highly recommended. Full steam on, Tuxers. Read more Also: This week in Usability & Productivity, part 20

Sad News! Development Stopped for Korora and BackSlash Linux

It seems more and more small distributions are facing a had time. Recently we saw the crisis at Void Linux. Now we have two more small Linux distributions calling it quit, albeit temporarily. Read more