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The Best Linux Distributions for 2018

Filed under
GNU
Linux

It’s a new year and the landscape of possibility is limitless for Linux. Whereas 2017 brought about some big changes to a number of Linux distributions, I believe 2018 will bring serious stability and market share growth—for both the server and the desktop.

For those who might be looking to migrate to the open source platform (or those looking to switch it up), what are the best choices for the coming year? If you hop over to Distrowatch, you’ll find a dizzying array of possibilities, some of which are on the rise, and some that are seeing quite the opposite effect.

So, which Linux distributions will 2018 favor? I have my thoughts. In fact, I’m going to share them with you now.

Similar to what I did for last year’s list, I’m going to make this task easier and break down the list, as follows: sysadmin, lightweight distribution, desktop, distro with more to prove, IoT, and server. These categories should cover the needs of any type of Linux user.

With that said, let’s get to the list of best Linux distributions for 2018.

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IPFire 2.19 - Core Update 117 released

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GNU
Linux
Security

The first Core Update is ready to be released today and it comes withh a huge number of various bug and security fixes.

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GNU/Linux on Desktops: Dell, New York Times, Pros and cons of Linux

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GNU
Linux
  • Dell XPS 13 with 8th-gen Intel Core now available (with Windows or Ubuntu)

    Dell’s new XPS 13 laptop is thinner than its predecessors, features slimmer bezels, and adds a Windows Hello-compatible infrared camera. There’s also a brand new white model if you prefer that to the black and silver version Dell’s been offering for the past few years.

  • Taking a Look at Linux

    Linux, the open-source operating system project first developed by Linus Torvalds in 1991, is now used by millions of people on desktop computers, mobile devices and servers; Google’s Android and Chrome OS even have Linux roots. Because the software has been free and open for developers to enhance and improve for years, Linux is now available in many versions (typically called “distributions”) that vary in complexity and user interface.

    In terms of being able to do everything a Windows desktop can do, a Linux system is certainly capable of most common tasks, like browsing the web, sending and receiving email, creating documents and spreadsheets, streaming music and editing photos. Many Linux distributions include all the basic programs you need, and you can install others from Linux software repositories online, but make a list of everything you need to do on the computer and make sure you have a Linux solution for it.

  • Pros and cons of Linux

    Windows today beats almost all the markets thanks to its simplicity and large number of programs and games in a free access. We are used to Windows since there are no compatible systems like Windows. However, it is not true. Only a small number of people might have heard about Linux. This operating system started at the beginning of 90th and quickly gained popularity for supercomputers and huge server rooms. Today, you will actually be able to compare all the advantages and disadvantages of Linux operating system to understand whether it is worth your attention or not. Maybe, you will be even convinced of switching over to Linux after all. So let's start with advantages and disadvantages and then a small summary that I hope will help you to process all the newly acquainted information.

More Linux Mint 19 Release Details

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GNU
Linux
  • Linux Mint 19 Release Date and Codename Has been Announced

    This is a continually updated article to inform you about Linux Mint 19 release date, features and everything important associated with it.

    Linux Mint 19 codename has just been released. The first release of the upcoming Linux Mint 19 series will be called “Tara”.

  • Linux Mint 18.3: A breath of fresh air? Well, it's a step into the unGNOME

    The Linux Mint project turned out to be an early Christmas present, as it usually does, but this release is perhaps more important than usual given that Mint is much more alone in the Linux distro world than it was just one year ago.

    2017 saw Ubuntu abandon the Unity desktop and come back to the GNOME fold, which means that Linux Mint is now the most popular distro that doesn't ship with GNOME. Mind you, Linux Mint doesn't just not ship GNOME by default, it doesn't ship a GNOME version at all. That doesn't just make it unique, but also more important than ever.

  • Linux Mint 19 “Tara” Release Date Announced: Know Expected Features Here

    The latest release of Linux Mint 18.3 “Sylvia” kicked off the development of the new Linux Mint 19.x series. In a recent blog post, the development team shared some brief updates on the same. It has been confirmed that the first release in this series will be called Linux Mint 19 “Tara.” “Tara is a popular name here in Ireland, and the name of someone we really like,” the announcement read.

  • Linux Mint team targets May or June 2018 for Linux Mint 19 release

    The release of Linux Mint 18.3 in November 2017 put the development focus of the team on Linux Mint 19, the next major version of the popular Linux distribution.

    Linux Mint 19 is the first significant release of the operating system since June 2016 when Linux Mint 17, codename Sarah, was released by the team.

And we return to Munich's migration back to Windo- it's going to cost what now?! €100m!

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Munich City officials could waste €100m reversing a 15-year process that replaced proprietary software with open source following an official vote last year.

Munich officials in 2003 voted to migrate to an in-house custom version of Ubuntu Linux called LiMux and tailor digital docs to be compatible with LibreOffice. Now the councillors have decided that Munich will switch some 29,000 PCs to Windows 10 and phase out Linux by early 2023.

The cost of the U-turn could be even more catastrophic if another council vote by the end of 2018 fails to take a more reasoned tally. An approval would replace the open-source office suite LibreOffice with Microsoft Office.

That decision will cost the city upwards of €50m plus another €50m to revert to Windows 10, according to reports. The bill results from a combination of buying Windows 10 licences and converting some 12,000 LibreOffice templates and macros along with developing a new templating system for Microsoft Office.

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Librem Tablet In 2018

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GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Purism Planning To Release Their Librem Tablet In 2018

    Not only is Purism working on their Librem 5 smartphone this year with hopes of still readying the software and hardware for shipping to consumers in 2019, but they are also planning to unveil their tablet this year.

    Todd Weaver, the founder and CEO of Purism, posted today about the company's goals for 2018. Besides releasing the development board for the Librem 5 phone this year and working on other efforts for their smartphone plans, they are also planning to "release the much-anticipated Librem tablet."

  • Happy New Year! Purism Goals for 2018

    Purism has some lofty goals that seem more attainable with each advancement that we make. Our pace for these achievements is already impressive, and we plan on maintaining and exceeding that pace in 2018.

Bye bye Windows 10, and good riddance

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

At this point I’d had more than enough of Microsoft Windows. I used my laptop to download the ISO for Lubuntu 17.10 and create a LivePendrive, and I installed Lubuntu on the Aspire XC600. Although I run a source-based Linux distribution on two laptops, for ease and speed of installation and maintenance I opted to install a binary-based distribution on the family PC. I chose Lubuntu specifically because it uses the LXDE desktop environment, which is closer in look and feel to classic Windows than e.g. the Unity or GNOME desktop environments in Ubuntu, and is not as processor-hungry as KDE. I found that Lubuntu worked extremely well out-of-the-box, including scanning and printing using my Canon MP510 MFP. I used the GUI Software utility (‘System Tools’ > ‘Software’ from the LXDE application menu) to uninstall AbiWord and Gnumeric and install the LibreOffice suite. I added user accounts for all my family (‘System Tools’ > ‘Users and Groups’). Since the machines on my home network use SMB to share files, I installed samba and sambaclient and edited the smb.conf file via the command line, and browsing SMB shares worked first time. We have a decent family PC again.

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OpenWRT + LEDE Move Ahead With Their Re-Merge

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Last summer the embedded Linux OpenWRT and LEDE projects voted in favor of re-merging their efforts while now in 2018 that effort is coming back together now that the logistics have been addressed.

The re-merged project is unifying under the long-standing OpenWRT branding rather than the "Linux Embedded Development Environment" (LEDE). The project will be governed using rules established by LEDE following their creation of that fork in 2016.

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Linux Mint 19 codenamed “Tara”

Filed under
GNU
Linux

GTK 3.22 is a major stable release for GTK3. From there on, the theming engine and the APIs are stable. This is a great milestone for GTK3. It also means Linux Mint 19.x (which will become our main development platform) will use the same version of GTK as LMDE 3, and distributions which use components we develop, such as Fedora, Arch..etc. This should ease development and increase the quality of these components outside of Linux Mint.

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Also: Linux Mint 19 "Tara" Slated for Release in May/June 2018, Based on Ubuntu 18.04

Linux Mint Translation Guide

Viper Window Manager 3.0.2 Released!

Filed under
GNU
Linux

After languishing for nearly half a decade, I recently dusted off the code for VWM. Although the original release worked well, it never quite satisfied my technical idealism. There were lots of things I wanted to implement, fix, or clean-up, but none of them were trivial. But let me digress for a bit…

What is VWM? Viper Window Manger (VWM) is a lightweight window manager for the console. You heard right! VWM is a window manager for the console. It’s built on top of libviper which is a convenience layer on top of ncurses and a GTK-like framework for rapidly creating console programs.

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OSS Leftovers

  • Why no more new AND successful FOSS projects in the last ten years?
     

    If you ask me, the new, successful FOSS projects should be project that fix, replace, rewrite, whatever… the really unglamorous, low-level tools, libraries and so on that would make that happen. Yes, I know that this is really unlikely to happen under current business models and until IoT everywhere, new iPhones every year and the like are perceived as higher priorities, regardless of their environmental impacts and, very often, sheer lack of sense.

  • FOSS Backstage - CfP open
    It's almost ten years ago that I attended my first ApacheCon EU in Amsterdam. I wasn't entirely new to the topic of open source or free software. I attended several talks on Apache Lucene, Apache Solr, Hadoop, Tomcat, httpd (I still remember that the most impressive stories didn't necessarily come from the project members, but from downstream users. They were the ones authorized to talk publicly about what could be done with the project - and often became committers themselves down the road.
  • Liveblogging RIT’s FOSS projects class: initial questions for community spelunking
    Stephen Jacobs (SJ) and I are co-teaching “Project in FOSS Development” at RIT this semester, which basically means “hey students, want to get course credit for contributing to a FOSS project?” The class is centered around 5 project sprints of two weeks each. The first 3 weeks of class are preparing for the sprint periods; the week before spring break is a pause to reflect on how sprints are going. Otherwise, class efforts will be centered around executing project work… (aka “getting stuff done”).
  • Design’N’Buy launches All-In-One Designer on Magento Open Source 2.2
    Design’N’Buy announces the launch of their flagship product – the AIOD on Magento Open Source Version 2.2. With the launch of web to print solution on Magento Version 2.2 , Design’N’Buy becomes first event in web to print industry to offer complete eCommerce printing solution for printers on one of the widest and latest technology platform.
  • Singapore: Blockchain startup Bluzelle raises $19.5m through ICO
    Singapore-based decentralised database provider Bluzelle has announced that its initial coin offering (ICO) has raised $19.5 million in funding, according to a press statement.
  • Blockchain Startup Bluzelle Raises $19.5M USD In ICO
    Bluzelle’ advisor list includes the likes of Brian Fox, creator of GNU Bash, Alex Leverington, one of the original Core ethereum developers, Prashant Malik, co-creator of Apache Cassandra and Ryan Fugger, the original creator of the cryptocurrency Ripple.
  • The Document Liberation project announces five new or improved libraries
    The Document Liberation Project has announced five new or improved libraries to export EPUB3 and import AbiWord, MS Publisher, PageMaker and QuarkXPress files.
  • Lawsuit accuses PACER of milking the public for cash in exchange for access
    The federally run online court document access system known as PACER now finds itself listed on a federal docket. Its overseer, the US government, is a defendant in a proposed class-action lawsuit accusing the service of overcharging the public. The suit, brought by three nonprofits on Thursday, claims millions of dollars generated from a recent 25-percent increase in page fees are being illegally spent by the Administrative Office of the Courts (AO). The cost for access is 10 cents per page and up to $3 a document. Judicial opinions are free. This isn't likely to break the bank for some, but to others it adds up and can preclude access to public records. The National Consumer Law Center, the Alliance for Justice, and the National Veterans Legal Services Program also claim in the lawsuit that these fees are illegal because the government is charging more than necessary to keep the PACER system afloat (as is required by Congress).
  • Is the Most Massive, Illegal Paywall in the World About to Come Down?
    A groundbreaking lawsuit is poised to decimate what is arguably the most unjust, destructive, and it now sounds like illegal paywall in the world, the Public Access to Court Electronic Records, PACER. PACER is the federal government court documents repository. Every federal court document, for every case, lives in PACER. It’s essentially a giant FTP document repository with a horrendous search system bolted on, not dissimilar to EDGAR. PACER was created in 1988 to enable access to court records electronically. Initially available only in courthouses the system was expanded to the web in 2001.
  • Codasip Announces Studio 7, Design and Productivity Tools for Rapid Generation of RISC-V Processors
    Codasip, the leading supplier of RISC-V® embedded processor IP, today announced that it has launched the 7th generation of its Studio, the unique IP-design and customization software that allows for fast configuration and optimization of RISCV processors, customer-proprietary processor architectures, and their accompanying software development toolchains.
  • EE4J Code Begins the Journey to Open Source
    The EE4J project, which was created to manage the Eclipse Foundation’s stewardship of Java EE technologies following Oracle’s decision to open source them, is starting to gain traction. Soon after the project was created, EclipseLink and Yasson (the official reference implementation of Java JSON Binding, JSR-367) became the first two projects to be transferred under the EE4J umbrella. As reported in December, the announcement was made that seven more projects were being proposed.

Database SQLite 3.22.0 Released